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SSP 11-06-07 02:00 PM

Installing Rear Rack & Fender - Fenders First?
 
I'm close to finishing building up a "car replacement / winter" bike, based on a Surly LHT.

It's currently dry here in northern California, and I'm not sure I want to install the fenders before I start using the bike. But, if I install the rack first, will that make it more difficult to install the fenders later on?

The rack is one of the newer Trek "interchange" models, and the fenders are SKS.

cyccommute 11-06-07 04:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SSP (Post 5585858)
I'm close to finishing building up a "car replacement / winter" bike, based on a Surly LHT.

It's currently dry her in northern California, and I'm not sure I want to install the fenders before I start using the bike. But, if I install the rack first, will that make it more difficult to install the fenders later on?

The rack is one of the newer Trek "interchange" models, and the fenders are SKS.

Short answer: no. I don't run fenders all the time and installing them under the rack is pretty trivial. Use a ziptie at the brake bridge to hold the fender rather than a bolt. Since the LHT has double eyelets, attaching the rack to the frame isn't an issue.

SSP 11-06-07 05:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cyccommute (Post 5586848)
Short answer: no. I don't run fenders all the time and installing them under the rack is pretty trivial. Use a ziptie at the brake bridge to hold the fender rather than a bolt. Since the LHT has double eyelets, attaching the rack to the frame isn't an issue.

Excellent...thanks for the heads-up!

Monoborracho 11-07-07 02:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cyccommute (Post 5586848)
Short answer: no. I don't run fenders all the time and installing them under the rack is pretty trivial. Use a ziptie at the brake bridge to hold the fender rather than a bolt. Since the LHT has double eyelets, attaching the rack to the frame isn't an issue.


Agree with cyccommute, particularly for the LHT with double fork eyelet. I always hate putting the racks on outside of the fender mounts using the same bolt/eyelet on my 520, which only has one front fork braze-on outlet. Doing so puts the weight of the rack (and any load) further away from the eyelet and out on the end of the bolt, where there is more bending moment.

You can use a zip tie for quick on and off of fenders, and its really a lot easier. If you have some aluminum (such as an old reflector mount) and are handy with a drill, saw, file, and small hammer, its no big deal to make nice looking piece of aluminum into a mounting bracket for use at the brake bridge or fork.

JiveTurkey 11-07-07 02:54 PM

On my commuter, in the back there is only one set of eyelets. To use a rack and full-coverage fenders, I use an extra long bolt. From outside to in, it goes: Bolt, rack, eyelet, fender, nut. If the eyelet was not threaded I'd put another nut between the eyelet and fender.

I find this setup secures the rack just as well with or without the fender. But, this is on a fixed single-speed w/120 mm hub w/extra spacers for a 126 mm frame, and the bolt runs close to the chain.

For a geared bike, I imagine this might work: Bolt, fender, nut, rack, eyelet, nut. It keeps everything but the second nut on the outside but should secure the rack well if the first nut presses the fender really tight against the bolt head. Of course, it won't be quick to get the fenders on or off, but here in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, I keep the fenders on the commuter year round.

MichaelW 11-08-07 12:14 PM

I manage with one eyelets using bolt,washer,fender,rack,frame eyelet.
You can use a nylock nut to lock the whole thing together on the inside if you use an extra long bolt.


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