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  1. #1
    Question Authority ciras3's Avatar
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    Which repair stand to purchase ?

    Looking to purchase a repair stand. Winter is coming to the frozen north and want to work on my bikes in my basement workshop. I've looked on the net, on E-bay, and there is a wide array of them. Wanted to know which one is the preferred one by the members of this forum. I'm looking to spend upwards of $150 because I know you "get what you pay for" but wanted to see what everyone else is using before placing my order.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    for the better
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    Got this one recently from Jenson for $80. It's a great deal for the money - easily $150 worth of stand.

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...air+Stand.aspx

  3. #3
    shovel motor
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    Pedro's Repair Stand 6450700

    I've used a wide array of stands and this one is my favorite portable.
    They are super solid, stable, easy to use, fold, and even include a carry bag.
    You can find them for well under $300 online.
    My favorite features are the quick grip clamp and ability to telescope to 72 inches.

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    You've looked on the net and ebay, now try the search function on here . Words like work( )stand, repair stand, recommend, etc. Many, many, many times covered.

    You should be very happy with your purchase at that price point.

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    repair stand recommendations

    I recommend a Park Tool repair stand with a t-handle on the knob which clamps the bike to the stand. I used one like this in the past and when you have the bike in one hand and have to turn the knob with the other the best kind of knob it a t-handle. These sell for about $150 and folds up fairly nice but not real compact.

    I purchased a Spin Doctor Pro G3 from Performance and don't like the round knob which clamps the bike to the frame. Other than that it is portable, sets up easily and really folds down into a compact package. It sells for $200 and is on sale every other month for $150. Performance does have a higher end model.

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    ... finish my sentence ...

    Performance does have a higher end model around $300 ... on sale every other month for $230 to $260 ... comes with a T-handel.

  7. #7
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ciras3 View Post
    Looking to purchase a repair stand. Winter is coming to the frozen north and want to work on my bikes in my basement workshop. I've looked on the net, on E-bay, and there is a wide array of them. Wanted to know which one is the preferred one by the members of this forum. I'm looking to spend upwards of $150 because I know you "get what you pay for" but wanted to see what everyone else is using before placing my order.

    Thanks
    Don't mess with anything other than the Park PCS-4 or PCS-3. I know they are more then your budget but these are investment repair stands. You'll never need another one. I don't know that the same can be said of the other stands.

    I have the PCS-3 version that I purchased 15 to 20 years ago and I'll probably give it to my kids. Worth the money.
    Stuart Black
    Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
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  8. #8
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    For most jobs I prefer the stand that clamps the fork and supports the bottom bracket (or conversely the rear dropouts and the bottom bracket). Park makes a couple - PRS-20 and PRS-21 (regular and light). I only have a Blackburn tripod version of those - it folds up to the size of a 3 foot long 2x4 and I bring it to races etc.

    I worked in shops for 15 years and we always had the PRS-3 or its double version, the PRS-2. Once at the right height (pretty high for being in your basement or even a standard room) they are excellent - they'll outlast the building they're in. Just twirl the bike around so whatever you're working on is right in front of you.

    However, if you don't have it at the right height, you end up with a crick in your back. This is my paranoia. It might have something to do with the first low stand I ever used - the guy who bought it said he saw the stand in an unmanned shop. It was so low it barely raised a bike off the ground - how could anyone work on it? He called out and some old guy shuffled out of the back room - his back had a huge hump in it and he was at virtually face level with the stand.

    lol I've always been afraid of becoming that old guy.

    With a seatpost clamp stand, sometimes ceilings will limit you - tire or fork marks in the ceiling may not fly for some people (or the occasional light smash). Additionally, with modern bikes, when you really need to hammer on something (frozen BB cup for example) I'd worry about breaking something on the bike like the post or the seat tube (since you always clamp the seat post). Seatpost (carbon or other light stuff) with a long extension going into a fragile superlight seat tube - doesn't make for strong leverage.

    Plus I'm little so my post never fits in the clamp unless I move it around. Carbon posts discourage any moving and I never get the seat back correctly.

    So for me, fork/bb or rear dropout/bb.

    afraid of having a hump in my back,
    cdr
    "...during the Lance years, being fit became the No. 1 thing. Totally the only thing. It’s a big part of what we do, but fitness is not the only thing. There’s skills, there’s tactics … there’s all kinds of stuff..." Tim Johnson

  9. #9
    SSP
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    Software for Cyclists SSP's Avatar
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    None better than the Ultimate Pro Elite. Stable, easily adjustable, and easy to collapse and throw into the car.

    Last edited by SSP; 11-09-07 at 07:18 PM.
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    Ultimate. If I ever break mine I'll just buy another one.

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    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
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    Another vote for the Park PCS-4. It's worth the few extra dollars. The cheaper stands will seem like junk after you use a good one.

  12. #12
    Double Naught Spy TrekDen's Avatar
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    I have this one from Performance, and find it able to handle what I can personally dish out. Another plus is it folds up pretty small, so it can be taken along when I travel for an organized ride. It's come in handy on a couple occasions.

    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...tegory_ID=4216

  13. #13
    Senior Member George's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSP View Post
    None better than the Ultimate Pro Elite. Stable, easily adjustable, and easy to collapse and throw into the car.

    +1 I really like mine.
    George

  14. #14
    Senior Member RockyMtnMerlin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    +1 I really like mine.
    +2.

  15. #15
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carpediemracing View Post
    For most jobs I prefer the stand that clamps the fork and supports the bottom bracket (or conversely the rear dropouts and the bottom bracket). Park makes a couple - PRS-20 and PRS-21 (regular and light). I only have a Blackburn tripod version of those - it folds up to the size of a 3 foot long 2x4 and I bring it to races etc.

    I worked in shops for 15 years and we always had the PRS-3 or its double version, the PRS-2. Once at the right height (pretty high for being in your basement or even a standard room) they are excellent - they'll outlast the building they're in. Just twirl the bike around so whatever you're working on is right in front of you.
    I've tried the fork mount type of stand you suggest and never liked it. Since most work on bikes takes place at the bottom bracket, I always had to kneel on the ground to do the work. Not that much of a problem since I had a bike/car accident 20 years ago that destroyed the nerve in my knee (I can't feel anything in that knee) but I did get tired of dirty pants all the time

    The other problem with that stand is working on the headset is more difficult. The bike has to be supported by the fork so removing the fork becomes problematic.


    Quote Originally Posted by carpediemracing View Post
    However, if you don't have it at the right height, you end up with a crick in your back. This is my paranoia. It might have something to do with the first low stand I ever used - the guy who bought it said he saw the stand in an unmanned shop. It was so low it barely raised a bike off the ground - how could anyone work on it? He called out and some old guy shuffled out of the back room - his back had a huge hump in it and he was at virtually face level with the stand.

    lol I've always been afraid of becoming that old guy.

    My stand was like the one you describe until I had someone add a piece of tube to it. Park no longer sells stands of that height. One nice feature of the PCS-4 is that it has an adjustable height. Rather than just spin the bike around, you can also move the height up and down.

    Quote Originally Posted by carpediemracing View Post
    With a seatpost clamp stand, sometimes ceilings will limit you - tire or fork marks in the ceiling may not fly for some people (or the occasional light smash). Additionally, with modern bikes, when you really need to hammer on something (frozen BB cup for example) I'd worry about breaking something on the bike like the post or the seat tube (since you always clamp the seat post). Seatpost (carbon or other light stuff) with a long extension going into a fragile superlight seat tube - doesn't make for strong leverage.
    I have knocked lights out of my fixtures in the garage. But you learn not to do that after the 6th or 7th time

    I've never had a problem with breaking the post or anything else on the frame. But I also always lubricate threaded parts before installation. Park also sells an insert for the frame if the seatpost is particularly fragile. I use it when working on my wife's bike too since her bike is really tiny and harder find a place to clamp too.


    Quote Originally Posted by carpediemracing View Post
    Plus I'm little so my post never fits in the clamp unless I move it around. Carbon posts discourage any moving and I never get the seat back correctly.

    So for me, fork/bb or rear dropout/bb.

    afraid of having a hump in my back,
    cdr
    Use a permanent marker and mark your height on the seat post. On a black post it's nearly invisible (you can turn the post in the light to see where it is). That way, if you have to remove the post, you can put it back where it belongs.
    Stuart Black
    Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
    Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
    Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
    Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
    An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by George View Post
    +1 I really like mine.
    +2 on the Ultimate Pro Elite. I love the clamp mechanism and unless you have a carbon bike with an integrated seatpost, this is the stand to buy. Like you said, you get what you pay for. Its a little more that what your posted budget, but really, a repair stand is something you buy once and probably never buy again.

  17. #17
    Senior Member kenshinvt's Avatar
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    I have the Park PCS-10 and love it. Bought it based mostly on recommendations from past BF threads. After searching them, one consistent theme I did see was to stay away from the spin doctor (performance brand) stands for a variety of reasons.

    The PCS-10 has a soft clamp with dual cable grooves and is very quickly adjusted. The entire thing folds up quite compactly, though it takes 4 or 5 steps to get it there. Very stable tri-leg design that doesnt shake even when I'm hammering on the pedals or other high-movement repairs. I admittedly don't have experience with other brand stands, but this fits my requirements exactly (as have many park tool products). Got it for around $130 w/ free instore pickup + additional 10% team performance credit.

  18. #18
    cab horn
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    Use a permanent marker and mark your height on the seat post. On a black post it's nearly invisible (you can turn the post in the light to see where it is). That way, if you have to remove the post, you can put it back where it belongs.
    Put a piece of electrical tape - better than marker.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  19. #19
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by operator View Post
    Put a piece of electrical tape - better than marker.
    Tape comes off too easily. If the post slips so does the tape. The marker slips with the post. If it disappears, the post is slipping
    Stuart Black
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    Quote Originally Posted by edvalds View Post

    I purchased a Spin Doctor Pro G3 from Performance and don't like the round knob which clamps the bike to the frame. Other than that it is portable, sets up easily and really folds down into a compact package. It sells for $200 and is on sale every other month for $150. Performance does have a higher end model.
    I like my Spin Doctor G3 ALOT. The good thing about the round nob as opposed to the clamp is that you cannot generate enough force on that nob to crush a tube. The only thing I did not like was that the clamps have plastic instead of rubber jaws. I fixed that with a cutup tube and some zip ties.

    Note, it's the same stand as the Topeak PrepStand Elite. Topeak also offers a model with an integrated scale instead of a parts bin.

    For the OP, the best stands have a "tripod" design. Look to Ultimate for great stands, but the Spin Doctor will be the cheapest "stable" stand you can get.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    I've tried the fork mount type of stand you suggest and never liked it. Since most work on bikes takes place at the bottom bracket, I always had to kneel on the ground to do the work. Not that much of a problem since I had a bike/car accident 20 years ago that destroyed the nerve in my knee (I can't feel anything in that knee) but I did get tired of dirty pants all the time

    The other problem with that stand is working on the headset is more difficult. The bike has to be supported by the fork so removing the fork becomes problematic.
    The PRS-20 has a center column which can be raised so I don't see why you would have to kneel. If you need to work on the fork/headset, the bike can be held by the rear dropouts.

  22. #22
    Bikaholic blamp28's Avatar
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    For what it's worth, I use the Ultimate pro stand. I find the base to be the best for overall use. It is portable and we definitely take it on bike /camping trips as well as to races. The tripod leg arrangement is great for uneven ground and such. This is unimportant if you will only use it one a smooth and level garage floor or driveway but otherwise, it might be worth considering. By the way, the tool tray for the Ultimate has a cool parts cleaning bin.
    Trek Fuel XC MTB, Giant OCR Road Bike, Rans Screamer - Tandem

  23. #23
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adgrant View Post
    The PRS-20 has a center column which can be raised so I don't see why you would have to kneel. If you need to work on the fork/headset, the bike can be held by the rear dropouts.
    Old bottom bracket mount racks didn't have a height adjustment. At least that's an improvement. But looking at the way you have to clamp the rear wheel in to work on the fork looks like a royal pain. Considering that the price is about the same as a PCS-4 and that you have to disassemble a bike rather than just clamp it with one hand, I don't see that it's better.
    Stuart Black
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    Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
    Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
    Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
    An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

  24. #24
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    Some clarifications:
    1. My new frame (non-compact) returns me to the "I can't clamp my post without moving it first". It of course has a carbon post and it's my first OS post so I don't have spares. And the tubes are all weird sizes (not that I'd clamp a tube but still). I prefer to keep the bike untouched if I put it in a stand. I prefer taking a wheel off (normal occurance) instead of moving a post (abnormal occurance). In addition, for the frames with built in post clamps, I hate tightening and untightening such things any more than necessary.
    2. I have the PCS 4 and find it pretty much useless for me. Great stand, just not for me. I prefer my cheap fork/rear-dropout mount + BB rest stand and it fits easily in my very space-limited car.

    I agree on the hammering - I realized that I'd take the bike off the stand and either use the ground or a vise to back up my "hammering". This usually involves bikes I don't own.

    I agree on tape vs magic marker.

    Park used to sell (still does?) an extension for their "shop" stands. We always got them.

    always learning,
    cdr
    "...during the Lance years, being fit became the No. 1 thing. Totally the only thing. It’s a big part of what we do, but fitness is not the only thing. There’s skills, there’s tactics … there’s all kinds of stuff..." Tim Johnson

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    Old bottom bracket mount racks didn't have a height adjustment. At least that's an improvement. But looking at the way you have to clamp the rear wheel in to work on the fork looks like a royal pain. Considering that the price is about the same as a PCS-4 and that you have to disassemble a bike rather than just clamp it with one hand, I don't see that it's better.
    Personally I would rather remove a wheel than risk damaging my seatpost or taking the time to switch to a junk seatpost.

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