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Thread: Quick Release

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    Quick Release

    I just built a commuter RB and the rear wheel I'm using is approx 5mm short of reaching the dropouts. The quick release takes up the slack nicely when tightened and the axle is then thouroughly recessed in drop outs. So far, I've put around 500 miles on it and I absolutely love this bike.

    1. Is it okay to take up the 5mm slack with the quick release?

    2. Is there any brand that's better than others or stronger material?

    Thx
    Last edited by linx; 11-14-07 at 02:04 PM.

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    Pleasurable Pain greyghost_6's Avatar
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    If the frame is steel you are fine. If the frame is aluminum you are OK. If the bike is steel look up what Sheldon Brown says about "Cold Setting" maybe you woudl benifit from that. Personally I ran a 130mm hub in a 126mm aluminum frame for 2000+ miles (spread the frame a bit). Any brand of what thats better? Quick releases? I have heard that XTR makes the best. Hope that helps a little.
    I had to re-learn how to walk once, but never needed to re-learn how to ride a bike. Cyclist for life.

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    This sounds like a 126 mm hub in a 130 mm frame or a 130 mm hub in a 135 mm frame. Compressing the frame should do no harm but you can change the axle for a longer one, add spacers on the non-drive side and reduce the wheel dish as a more elegant fix.

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    Gone, but not forgotten Sheldon Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    This sounds like a 126 mm hub in a 130 mm frame or a 130 mm hub in a 135 mm frame. Compressing the frame should do no harm but you can change the axle for a longer one, add spacers on the non-drive side and reduce the wheel dish as a more elegant fix.
    That's correct, except the part about needing a new axle.

    In most cases, widening the spacing of a quick release hub does not require installing a longer axle.

    Typical quick-release hubs are supplied with axles 11 mm longer than the designed spacing, so there's 5.5 mm of protrusion on each side. That is WAY more protrusion than is actually needed.*

    When adding spacers to a multispeed hub, the spacers should always go on the left side, between the cone and the locknut. You should re-adjust the position of the right cone and locknut so that the protrusion will be similar on both sides.

    You will then need to re-dish the wheel, most likely by tightening all of the spokes on the left side a bit. This is actually a Good Thing, because it results in a _stronger_ wheel!

    *Having _some_ protrusion is helpful for aligning the wheel, but in fact you don't _need_ any protrusion at all! I rode for quite a while on a hub that I had set up with the axles flush with the dropouts, with no problems. (This was for a fixed-gear conversion of a frame with vertical dropouts. Cutting the axle short gave me a bit of chain tension adjustability, as only the skewer shaft was running through the dropouts.)

    Note that reducing the dishing will result in making your rear wheel significantly stronger. Do it!

    Sheldon "Wider Is Better" Brown
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    greyghost_6

    I just ordered a rear XTR QR and presume it should fit.

    HillRider

    Yes, I think it's a 130 mm hub in a 135 mm frame and the QR tightens it down firmly.

    Sheldon Brown

    Thanks, I'll look into a longer axle down the line. For now compressing the drop outs seems to be working well. I just wanted to make sure I have a strong QR that's well made. Are the titanium ones better than the regular steel ones, anyone know?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown View Post
    That's correct, except the part about needing a new axle.

    In most cases, widening the spacing of a quick release hub does not require installing a longer axle.
    Right and I don't know why I didn't think to say that too. I've respaced a rear wheel myself from 126 to 130 mm and retained the same axle, just sacrificing part of the axle protrusion in doing so. Every thing worked well.

    This is fine for "one size" change (126 to 130 or 130 to 135). I don't think I'd do it from 126 to 135. That would leave only 1.5 mm protruding on each end and, while the qr does provide the needed wheel stability and you've used the technique successfully, I rather have a bit more for alignment and support purposes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by linx View Post
    Sheldon Brown

    Thanks, I'll look into a longer axle down the line. For now compressing the drop outs seems to be working well. I just wanted to make sure I have a strong QR that's well made. Are the titanium ones better than the regular steel ones, anyone know?
    There's no reason to replace the axle.

    There are no good titanium skewers that I know of.

    See: http://sheldonbrown.com/qr for the skinny on skewer quality.

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    Senior Member Joshua A.C. New's Avatar
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    Ah! This 100% answers my question over here!
    Joshua A.C. Newman,
    Passionate lover of construction

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheldon Brown View Post
    There's no reason to replace the axle.

    There are no good titanium skewers that I know of.

    See: http://sheldonbrown.com/qr for the skinny on skewer quality.

    Sheldon "Enclosed Cam" Brown
    Thanks for the link Sheldon. I ended up purchasing two NOS XTR skewers with the enclosed cams and they are much better than the ones I got rid of, which were non-enclosed and sometimes spun around when I tightened them. These XTRs really grip the dropouts and don't spin around.

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