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  1. #1
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
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    SRAM chain users, please I need your input:

    As some of you might know, the latest chain lube thread has helped me find out what lubricant SRAM uses (or, maybe "used", as someone mentioned they stopped the practice) on their chains in the factory. I have always been very pleased with what SRAM puts on their chain, and would ride them for the first 1000-1200 Km without applying any new lube without any issues.

    So now I have acquired the magic stuff (Gleitmo 582) and am evaluating it - the seller said that the storage expiration date is very much over, so if it doesn't work for me I don't have to pay them.

    I realized that I have never used the SRAM chains in their fresh-from-package state during the winter. I have no idea how the SRAM factory lube behaves at low temperatures, and I would really need this info from you guys, because while the lube seems very good (and I do intend to pay the seller for it), it seems less good than what I remember. I am trying to see if this is because of the lower temperature or because I applied it wrongly (too much of it - I'll return to this in the chain lube thread), or maybe the Gleitmo has, indeed, expired to some extent.

  2. #2
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    In what respect does it work "less good" than you remember?

    What product did you clean the chain with?
    Did you clean the chain thouroughly?
    Was the chain dry-as-a bone before relubing? Solvent residue (or water) will affect the lube's quality.

    BTW specs of GLEITMO 582 say min temp is -15 C. How's the weather in Helsinki?

  3. #3
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berre View Post
    In what respect does it work "less good" than you remember?

    What product did you clean the chain with?
    Did you clean the chain thouroughly?
    Was the chain dry-as-a bone before relubing? Solvent residue (or water) will affect the lube's quality.

    BTW specs of GLEITMO 582 say min temp is -15 C. How's the weather in Helsinki?
    • I think there's slighly more friction with the chain on which I applied the Gleitmo, compared to the new SRAM chain.
    • I cleaned one chain thoroughly, the other I cleaned well - but did not soak it into mineral spirit. I did remove all traces of dirt from the chain, but some of the previous lubricant may still ahve been present inside the rollers. I did not test the first bike, as it doesn't have studded tyres.
    • Both chains were dry as bones, I can guarantee that 100%.
    • I read the specs, but am thinking that viscosity may still be higher at these low temperatures, even though the lube works "within specs". Within specs doesn't usually mean "ideal" or even "optimal".
    • I cycled in -2 to -4. Today is warmer.


    Look, I answered all your questions Now wasn't I a good boy?

  4. #4
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
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    Could maybe someone now answer my question?

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    Quote Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
    Could maybe someone now answer my question?
    You "think" that there is "slightly" more friction.

    Unless you do a few "cross" tests under "lab" conditions at different temperatures, in which you compare the lube both on a new chain and on a used one, you can never be sure.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Sci-Fi's Avatar
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    Is GLEITMO 582 the right one? I know it says "white grease paste for chain lubrication" (spray application), but the notes say GLEITMO 577A and 577C is Sachs (SRAM?) approved. 577A is thick enough to be used during assembly of the chain (NLGI 1) and 577C is thin enough to be use as a lube (NLGI 00).
    http://www.fuchs-lubritech.com/cms/IMG/pdf_PG-4-e.pdf

  7. #7
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sci-Fi View Post
    Is GLEITMO 582 the right one? I know it says "white grease paste for chain lubrication" (spray application), but the notes say GLEITMO 577A and 577C is Sachs (SRAM?) approved. 577A is thick enough to be used during assembly of the chain (NLGI 1) and 577C is thin enough to be use as a lube (NLGI 00).
    http://www.fuchs-lubritech.com/cms/IMG/pdf_PG-4-e.pdf
    Good point. I assume(d) that the 582 is pretty much the same as 577C (white adhesive lubricant, -40 to +120C)

    Interesting, though: in the .pdf file it says -15C as the lower limit temp, but on my bottle it says -40. Not only that, but the .pdf says the 582 is semi-synthetic, unlike the 577A or C.

    Hmmm.....

  8. #8
    Elitist Troglodyte DMF's Avatar
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    Requiem for a Gleitmo ?



    Sorry, I just couldn't help myself. Any other 'Deadwood' fans out there?

  9. #9
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
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    There's something I don't understand: is theere really no SRAM user that bought and installed a SRAM chain during or at the beginning of winter? I find that hard to believe.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Sci-Fi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
    There's something I don't understand: is theere really no SRAM user that bought and installed a SRAM chain during or at the beginning of winter? I find that hard to believe.
    Depends on where you live and/or the amount of chain wear...most will just wait until it's time for a new chain and do routine maintenance/clean and lube the chain. Know a few that change to Wipperman (the stainless steel models) for the winter months then go back to SRAM for the rest of the year. And there are some that routinely put on a new chain after winter is over as part of their yearly maintenance schedule.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Nessism's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
    There's something I don't understand: is theere really no SRAM user that bought and installed a SRAM chain during or at the beginning of winter?

    What is your question? What are you trying to find out? Whether or not the lube you bought is appropriate for winter use? Honestly, you are way overthinking things here. Use the lube and judge for yourself if it meets your needs; you are splitting hairs on the details. If you are really concern about chain wear you will use a master link and remove the chain and dunk it in solvent when gunk builds up. This is far more important that worrying about small differences in chain lube.
    Becareful buying/selling bike parts on-line. I learned the hard way. :(

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  12. #12
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nessism View Post
    What is your question? What are you trying to find out? Whether or not the lube you bought is appropriate for winter use? Honestly, you are way overthinking things here. Use the lube and judge for yourself if it meets your needs; you are splitting hairs on the details. If you are really concern about chain wear you will use a master link and remove the chain and dunk it in solvent when gunk builds up. This is far more important that worrying about small differences in chain lube.

    This is your second "you are overthinking" post in what appears to be a very short time. I may be overthinking, but you are definitely not reading people's posts. If you are too distracted or busy to even read the posts to which you reply, why posting at all?

  13. #13
    biked well well biked's Avatar
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    I've used quite a few SRAM chains with factory GLEITMO lube, I honestly have never thought about the temps relating to the lube, etc. I'm sure I've used a new one in winter, and I've always found the factory lube to be very good ( I do wipe off the outside of the chain with solvent to remove it from the outside), but I don't usually ride in temps much less than 45 degrees Farenheit, unfortunately I have a respiratory condition that will usually flare up if I do, so for me "winter" probably means an entirely different thing.

    BUT, here's my take on the factory-applied GLEITMO: it's likely applied in a completely different manner than simply spraying it on the outside of the chain. I imagine it's somehow appplied under pressure to make sure the inside of the chain is completely coated, and that's the key to it working so well on new chains.

  14. #14
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by well biked View Post
    I've used quite a few SRAM chains with factory GLEITMO lube, I honestly have never thought about the temps relating to the lube, etc. I'm sure I've used a new one in winter, and I've always found the factory lube to be very good ( I do wipe off the outside of the chain with solvent to remove it from the outside), but I don't usually ride in temps much less than 45 degrees Farenheit, unfortunately I have a respiratory condition that will usually flare up if I do, so for me "winter" probably means an entirely different thing.

    BUT, here's my take on the factory-applied GLEITMO: it's likely applied in a completely different manner than simply spraying it on the outside of the chain. I imagine it's somehow appplied under pressure to make sure the inside of the chain is completely coated, and that's the key to it working so well on new chains.
    45F is about 7C - somewhat warmer than I had here, these days.

    I completely agree with your points - see, that's exactly what I am trying to determine: is there a problem in how I applied the lube, or is it supposed to behave this way in the cold(er) weather. Or did it expire (also a possibility - we're talking very old stock here).

    Thanks a lot for your input.

    I have determined today with absolute certainty that on my chain the lubrication is not working as it should - I had a very hard time climbing up on hills where I used to do fine with new SRAM chains or any old chain on which I used motor oil.

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    I'm not believing this 'going to the ends of the earth' strategy just to get a long lasting chain lube. Chain cleaning is so easy and takes so little time if you do it regularly. Once a week works well for me, although I used to do it after every ride. My ride buddies are lazy and do it once a month, which probably isn't enough. But changing the chain once a year cures all those potentilal problems. bk

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    biked well well biked's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkaapcke View Post
    But changing the chain once a year cures all those potentilal problems. bk

    Time, and even distance, isn't the way to determine when a chain should be replaced. Measure the chain wear. It's very quick and very easy. And it's the only accurate way to determine if a chain should be replaced.

  17. #17
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by well biked View Post
    Time, and even distance, isn't the way to determine when a chain should be replaced. Measure the chain wear. It's very quick and very easy. And it's the only accurate way to determine if a chain should be replaced.
    And for that, my very warm recommendation is this tool:

    It's the longest chainwear measurement tool, so it takes into consideration the most number of pins, which is good.

  18. #18
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    I have a chain tool, but still change it once a year. I ride about 2400 miles a year and experience has shown that the chain goes bad sometime in the second season. So, I just change it along with the other winter service/upgrades that I do. I've never toasted a casette with this approach. I do use two (recumbent) of SRAMS best chains, and their best 9spd cassette. My ride buddies, who use low end chains & cassettes, find that once a year works for them too.

    To me, a bike is a lot closer to a good watch in the watch to industrlal machinery spectrum. They just work better when everything is kept really clean, properly lubed and adjusted. In the case of chains, very lightly lubed. Bikes also work better with high quality components. In partilcular; drivetrain parts and wheels/hubs. The higher you go in quality, the more precision and finicky the parts are. They like maintenance and tuning.

    OK, I'm particular. Even to the point of being obsessive. But my stuff works perfectly, all the tilme. I insist on it, and do the necessary work to keep it that way. Here's my touchstone; In perfect tune, and really clean/lubed, SRAM ders/chain/cassettes will pop a 9-1 or 1-9 shift instantly, on the fly. Now, you would never need to make that shift, except to check the status of your equipment. However, I do use other multi-gear shifts fairly often. I think total maintenance is just part of the fun of biking. bk
    Last edited by bkaapcke; 12-16-07 at 02:37 PM.

  19. #19
    Senior Member Nessism's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
    I have determined today with absolute certainty that on my chain the lubrication is not working as it should - I had a very hard time climbing up on hills where I used to do fine with new SRAM chains or any old chain on which I used motor oil.
    You're joking right? You have a hard time on a hill and you think it's due to your chain lube.

    You just confirmed what I said earlier.
    Becareful buying/selling bike parts on-line. I learned the hard way. :(

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  20. #20
    Senior Member Ziemas's Avatar
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    I can't help you on the performance in cold weather as I always lube my chains with after market stuff, but I do know that Finish Line XC works wonders in the cold and in the wet.

  21. #21
    Senior Member barba's Avatar
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    I can't imagine that your chain lube is having an appreciable effect on your climbing ability.

  22. #22
    biked well well biked's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkaapcke View Post
    I have a chain tool, but still change it once a year. I ride about 2400 miles a year and experience has shown that the chain goes bad sometime in the second season. So, I just change it along with the other winter service/upgrades that I do. I've never toasted a casette with this approach. I do use two (recumbent) of SRAMS best chains, and their best 9spd cassette. My ride buddies, who use low end chains & cassettes, find that once a year works for them too.

    To me, a bike is a lot closer to a good watch in the watch to industrlal machinery spectrum. They just work better when everything is kept really clean, properly lubed and adjusted. In the case of chains, very lightly lubed. Bikes also work better with high quality components. In partilcular; drivetrain parts and wheels/hubs. The higher you go in quality, the more precision and finicky the parts are. They like maintenance and tuning.

    OK, I'm particular. Even to the point of being obsessive. But my stuff works perfectly, all the tilme. I insist on it, and do the necessary work to keep it that way. Here's my touchstone; In perfect tune, and really clean/lubed, SRAM ders/chain/cassettes will pop a 9-1 or 1-9 shift instantly, on the fly. Now, you would never need to make that shift, except to check the status of your equipment. However, I do use other multi-gear shifts fairly often. I think total maintenance is just part of the fun of biking. bk
    I'm particular and use nice parts, too. That's why I measure my chains for wear instead of assuming they're worn out, or not, based on time or mileage. But to each their own.

  23. #23
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nessism View Post
    You're joking right? You have a hard time on a hill and you think it's due to your chain lube.

    You just confirmed what I said earlier.
    Quote Originally Posted by barba View Post
    I can't imagine that your chain lube is having an appreciable effect on your climbing ability.
    I have no idea what the heck should I do with comments like these. Apparently it's pointless replying as you made up your mind one way already.

    Same bike, same muscles, same hill, same chain. Different lubricant or lubricant application or temperature.

  24. #24
    sth
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    I like the feel and sound that a fresh chain makes with its nice slick coating of factory grease but, alas, that only lasts for maybe a 1000 km's in good weather. After that it is any particular brand of bicycle chain lube that suits your fancy and wallet. My lube of choice is from MEC. Its not likely any better than anything else but it is rather tenacious in the yucky wet winter I go through. Winter temps from -5C to +10C, lots of rain, grit and salt. The only lube that negatively affects my chains performance is no lube. One thing I have started to do is use two chains and swap them every 1000km. Gives me a fairly clean and well lubed chain more often. Sorry, but you really are over analyzing this. Same bike, same muscles, same hill...different day. Today you are full of piss and vinegar, tomorrow you are a slug. No biggie. Just lube that chain and enjoy the ride.

  25. #25
    Senior Member barba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
    Same bike, same muscles, same hill, same chain. Different lubricant or lubricant application or temperature.
    This is not even remotely close to a complete list of the things that can effect your perception of effort.

    I have used a lot of chain lubes, and while some seem to work better in terms of a quiet chain or longer life, none of them have had any influence on my performance as a rider.

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