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Old 12-15-07, 03:34 PM   #1
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...another grease thread...

So, based on the polls and posts, it seems that the big debate is bike-specific vs. automotive vs. lithium greases. Of course, I browsed through the posts after trying my own idea:

http://back2dabike.wordpress.com/200...earing-grease/

Yes, there are precautions against mixing/blending different greases... But it just made sense that the white lithium grease seemed too "thin", while the automotive grease seemed too "thick", and mixed together they seemed just "right"...

I've already done it, it's already on the bike. However, has anyone ever done this and regretted it?
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Old 12-16-07, 07:48 AM   #2
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So, based on the polls and posts, it seems that the big debate is bike-specific vs. automotive vs. lithium greases. Of course, I browsed through the posts after trying my own idea:

http://back2dabike.wordpress.com/200...earing-grease/

Yes, there are precautions against mixing/blending different greases... But it just made sense that the white lithium grease seemed too "thin", while the automotive grease seemed too "thick", and mixed together they seemed just "right"...

I've already done it, it's already on the bike. However, has anyone ever done this and regretted it?
I have. It was terrible - it was like the gears were immersed in molasses. BUT it was a specific lithium grease, it may be different from yours. Mine was "Mobil Mobilgrease Special 2".

Also, I didn't really blend two types of grease, I only used a solvent to dilute the lithium grease, to get it into the rollers of the chain. It wasn't a real solute, rather a collodial suspension, but for all intents and purpose and for all you would care, it was like a diluted lithium grease and then the solvent evaporates away.
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Old 12-16-07, 10:38 AM   #3
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What the grease "looks like" or "feels like" when you goop it on doesn't have much correspondence to what it acts like whilst being churned and mashed by steel balls.

Why does everyone try to second-guess lubrication engineers?
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Old 12-16-07, 11:17 AM   #4
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Kinda new to bikes, but not grease and bearings. For all intents and purposes; bike bearings have no significant load; only rpms. So...a quality "lighter grease" is the way to go. Prepping/inspecting the bearings and races is a far more important consideration that what type of grease....................unless we're talking bacon grease!!!
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Old 12-16-07, 11:20 AM   #5
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^^^No significant load, that may well be true, but you still want your grease to stay in place for the longest time. So it's not completely irrelevant what it is.

Nice drawing in the sig!
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Old 12-16-07, 11:40 AM   #6
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Another topic where you guys are overthinking things. General purpose auto grease is fine. Use it and be done. Use bike grease if you'd rather, it's fine as well.
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Old 12-16-07, 12:37 PM   #7
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Another topic where you guys are overthinking things.
Everybody's looking for an edge, and there are so few places, on a bike, where hands-on can really make a difference!
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Old 12-16-07, 01:00 PM   #8
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Another topic where you guys are overthinking things. General purpose auto grease is fine. Use it and be done. Use bike grease if you'd rather, it's fine as well.
I, too, am thinking were getting carried away here. This is for bicycles, for christ's sake, no high RPM's and no high loads. Also, I don't think we need to worry about viscous 'drag', I just don't believe it amounts to anything significant. JMHO.
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Old 12-16-07, 04:04 PM   #9
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Another topic where you guys are overthinking things. General purpose auto grease is fine. Use it and be done. Use bike grease if you'd rather, it's fine as well.
+1000
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Old 12-16-07, 04:22 PM   #10
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I've already done it, it's already on the bike. However, has anyone ever done this and regretted it?
I have never regretted using any kind of grease, properly applied! All I have ever regretted is NOT using grease

So yeah, don't worry about it! I can debate grease choice for days with the best of 'em , but frankly I think just about anything will work great for a bike as long as you replace it with appropriate frequency!!!
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Old 12-16-07, 04:35 PM   #11
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I only use Dupont Krytox aerospace III. Its $1606 a tube but it shaves .03 seconds off my 40K TT.

http://www.mcmaster.com/nav/enter.asp?pagenum=2089
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Old 12-16-07, 04:43 PM   #12
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I prefer Apiezon vacuum greases... absolutely critical for operating my bike in an ultra-high-vacuum environment!!! http://www.microscopes.com/ms-m2-lb-m-00100.html
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Old 12-16-07, 05:15 PM   #13
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What about a crank scraper and a windage tray?
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Old 12-16-07, 05:41 PM   #14
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Why does everyone try to second-guess lubrication engineers?
+1.

What about synthetics. Anyone here have anything to add? If so, please include some chemistry. Can anyone contribute as to how and why Teflon, Ceramics, Silicone or various other components, such as, solvents or binding agents are added to bike-specific lubricants and why they may differ from each other and/or greases designed for other commercial or industrial applications?

Please be specific as to whether you are referring to petroleum based, pure synthetic based or some of the petroleum based "synthetics" in your post.

This would be an interesting grease thread. And we all might learn something to one up our other bike geek friends at your LCS (Local Coffee Shop).

It's better 'cause it's greener doesn't count, anymore
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Old 12-16-07, 09:22 PM   #15
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It's better 'cause it's greener doesn't count, anymore
OK, Bob. This one's better 'cause it's blue-er:

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Old 12-17-07, 12:35 AM   #16
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OK, Bob. This one's better 'cause it's blue-er:

Now that's what I'm talking about.
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Old 12-18-07, 09:35 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Bob Dopolina View Post
+1.

What about synthetics. Anyone here have anything to add? If so, please include some chemistry. Can anyone contribute as to how and why Teflon, Ceramics, Silicone or various other components, such as, solvents or binding agents are added to bike-specific lubricants and why they may differ from each other and/or greases designed for other commercial or industrial applications?

Please be specific as to whether you are referring to petroleum based, pure synthetic based or some of the petroleum based "synthetics" in your post.

This would be an interesting grease thread. And we all might learn something to one up our other bike geek friends at your LCS (Local Coffee Shop).

It's better 'cause it's greener doesn't count, anymore
I can talk a bit about teflon (or PTFE): it's considered the solid material with lowest coefficient of friction.
In lubricants, teflon is used as a suspended solid particulate. You get these tiny little balls of teflon into your chain, and they act as lubricant thanks to their high surface slipperiness.Quite different form the long molecules of mineral or syntetic oils.

Other such "solid lubes" are graphite and boron nitride. But they can't even touch teflon's slipperiness. Teflon is king also in it's high inertness, only matched by gold and platinum. This aspect is mostly lost on motorists and cyclists.

Regarding synthetic vs. mineral oil: synthetic oils have higher chemical stability across temperatures and against shear, and are less viscous (again, across temperatures) vs. mineral oil. They also oxidize much slower than mineral oils, so they will last longer without deterioration.

Well, you can find a lot about lubes in this wikipedia article. Until some zealous wikipedia admin decides to "trim the content a bit". I hate it when they do that.
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Old 12-18-07, 10:27 AM   #18
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Regarding synthetic vs. mineral oil: synthetic oils have higher chemical stability across temperatures and against shear, and are less viscous (again, across temperatures) vs. mineral oil.
An important consideration since we're all aware of the high temperatures generated on a bicycle.

My tub of marine grease is red; will that work or am I doomed to crash & burn?
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Old 12-18-07, 10:33 AM   #19
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An important consideration since we're all aware of the high temperatures generated on a bicycle.

My tub of marine grease is red; will that work or am I doomed to crash & burn?
Well, speak for yourself. My bicycle reaches temperatures as high as 310... Kelvin.

Depends... are you a Communist and/or a Republican?
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Old 12-18-07, 10:44 AM   #20
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Well, speak for yourself. My bicycle reaches temperatures as high as 310... Kelvin.

Depends... are you a Communist and/or a Republican?
My bikes are always cool.

And let's leave religion out of this, ok?
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