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  1. #1
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    Two flats for this bike newbie

    I've got my new hardtail upside down adjacent here, the two tubes have been destroyed by a surprisingly sharp and strong plantlife around here. I need new tubes, but I'm unsure what tube size to get, or the quality I should be looking for.

    Along my wheels it says "XTB 24 / 700Cx28C/38C ETRO 622x20 DOUBLE WALL," So, I'm assuming that I should be looking for 24" tubes, but I'm not positive, and I'm also not sure what the other numbers represent or if they're important to purchasing new tubes.

    My main concern is to not let this happen again, so I want to purchase a few quality tubes that won't be easily compromised. I did some googling before I posted, and it seems that some tubes are heavier and grittier than others. What do you dudes suggest to get, on the rugged side?

    Thanks for any help.

  2. #2
    motovation frankenmike's Avatar
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    You need to ask for 700c tubes. For heavy thorn areas, there are several approaches towards thorn resistance: Thorn resistant tubes(available in 700c), sealant in the tube(slime or other), tire liners that go between the tube and the tire(which I've seen actually cause flats!), tires with armor embedded under the tread, or any combination of these four. Remember what kind of valve you need. Hope this helps..

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by frankenmike View Post
    You need to ask for 700c tubes. For heavy thorn areas, there are several approaches towards thorn resistance: Thorn resistant tubes(available in 700c), sealant in the tube(slime or other), tire liners that go between the tube and the tire(which I've seen actually cause flats!), tires with armor embedded under the tread, or any combination of these four. Remember what kind of valve you need. Hope this helps..
    I did some searching and I came upon these two:

    http://blbikeshop.com/itemdetails.cf...gId=39&id=7247
    http://blbikeshop.com/itemdetails.cf...gId=39&id=7248

    Both are 700C thorn resistant, but there is no sealant included.

    Are these what I'm looking for? I'm caution of that "24" number. If I get a 700C tube, and it says 28 wheels, aren't I screwed?
    Last edited by l0rca; 12-17-07 at 01:04 PM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Old School's Avatar
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    "XTB 24" = Weinmann wheel model
    "700C x 28C" = recommended tire size
    "622x20 DOUBLE WALL" = wheel size/construction

    You refer to your bike as a "hardtail" which is terminology usually associated with a mountain bike. But I suspect that it is most likely a hybrid or cross bike with 700c wheels.
    Last edited by Old School; 12-17-07 at 07:25 PM.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, "WOW! WHAT A RIDE!"

  5. #5
    Domestic Domestique UnsafeAlpine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by l0rca View Post
    I did some searching and I came upon these two:

    http://blbikeshop.com/itemdetails.cf...gId=39&id=7247
    http://blbikeshop.com/itemdetails.cf...gId=39&id=7248

    Both are 700C thorn resistant, but there is no sealant included.

    Are these what I'm looking for? I'm caution of that "24" number. If I get a 700C tube, and it says 28 wheels, aren't I screwed?
    Those tubes should last through thorn abuse. The difference is the valve stem, or the thing you put air into to fill the tire up. You need to examine the old valve stems and decide which one is needed. Schrader looks like a car tire's stem, while Presta is thin and all metal. Examples can be found here. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/brandt/presta-schrader.html

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    Where do you live, someone that lives in the same area maybe able to give you a good recommendation for that area of what to use.

  7. #7
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    If you have goatheads good luck. I've tried the thick "thorn resistant" and they didn't help. Slime just made it a mess to fix a flat.Carry spare tubes, patches, and the means to inflate several times. You'll eventually get fast at fixing flats.

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    Thanks for all the help you guys.

    You refer to your bike as a "hardtail" which is terminology usually associated with a mountain bike. But I suspect that it is most likely a hybrid or cross bike with 700c wheels.
    I don't know outside of how it is advertised by Diamondback. It's the reflex model:

    http://www.diamondback.com/items.asp...=14&itemid=219

    Those tubes should last through thorn abuse. The difference is the valve stem, or the thing you put air into to fill the tire up. You need to examine the old valve stems and decide which one is needed. Schrader looks like a car tire's stem, while Presta is thin and all metal. Examples can be found here.
    Yeah, mine are Shrader, so I went with them.

    Where do you live, someone that lives in the same area maybe able to give you a good recommendation for that area of what to use.
    Southern Spain, in Rota. I'm in the U.S. military; I live on base.

    If you have goatheads good luck. I've tried the thick "thorn resistant" and they didn't help. Slime just made it a mess to fix a flat.Carry spare tubes, patches, and the means to inflate several times. You'll eventually get fast at fixing flats.
    Yup, goatheads, and they riddled my tires last time. I may end up staying on road more than I like, but I'll definitely take your advice, and hopefully find somewhere around here that solicits bike stuff for cheap. The base doesn't have any tubes, which pissed me off pretty bad when I went in looking.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Pinyon's Avatar
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    Goathead thorns are very bad around here also. The only things that really help, but not cure, flats for me are really tough tires (Kevlar bead, gatorskins, etc. - these often wear out faster than touring and training tires, but are worth it - when they get flat and thin where the rubber meets the road, replace them), an ample supply of traditional glue-on tube patches (the pre-glued ones don't cut it over the long haul and varying temperatures), and I tend to keep a collection of 6-7 patched and tested and/or new tubes. You carry one to two tubes with you when you ride (two for 3+ hour rides), and patch and test the tubes the same day that they get a hole in them. I can go weeks to months with no flats, but can also have a 5-flat day once per year too, and the extra tubes come in handy. I don't replace tubes with new ones, until the accumulation of patches makes my bike feel wobbly on fast curves.

    If you live in goathead thorn country, you will quickly get proficient at changing tubes on the road. It will be a pain in the butt at first, but you will get quick at it in no time. I would also suggest a decent frame pump, like the Topeak Roadmorph, which has a flexible rubber hose that attaches to your valve (prevents holing the tube at the valve-stem base) and a little flip-out ground/foot platform that makes pumping easier than other pumps that you hold with both hands.

    Have fun out there!

  10. #10
    Bikaholic blamp28's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by l0rca View Post
    I don't know outside of how it is advertised by Diamondback. It's the reflex model:

    http://www.diamondback.com/items.asp...=14&itemid=219
    The bike in that advertisement uses 26" x 2.1 tires. You will need tubes sized for that tire with shrader valves if that is your bike.
    Trek Fuel XC MTB, Giant OCR Road Bike, Rans Screamer - Tandem

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by blamp28 View Post
    The bike in that advertisement uses 26" x 2.1 tires. You will need tubes sized for that tire with shrader valves if that is your bike.
    It's a different year, or something is at least different. What I wrote earlier is what it says along the wheels, so I think I'm safest going with that.

  12. #12
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    Dont worry about the thickness of the tubes. Just get standard tubes and then install SPIN SKINS or MR TUFFY tires liners. They work great out in the hills of East San Jose.. lots of goatheads and ZERO flats in over a year!

  13. #13
    Senior Member Joshua A.C. New's Avatar
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    A change from 26" to 700c is a pretty dramatic design change from one year to the next. That would make it a 29er (for reasons that are wholly stupid, sez me). Something doesn't match here.

    In any event, following the specs written on the side of the tire won't lead you astray if you know that they were working well before.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joshua A.C. New View Post
    A change from 26" to 700c is a pretty dramatic design change from one year to the next. That would make it a 29er (for reasons that are wholly stupid, sez me). Something doesn't match here.

    In any event, following the specs written on the side of the tire won't lead you astray if you know that they were working well before.
    I feel pretty dumb about this. While the other wheel had the previous specs, I didn't look until today and notice that the back wheel had this written on it instead:

    26x1.5/1.95 ETRO 559x20 DOUBLE WALL

    The wheels appear to be the same size, so I'm pretty confused why one would say one thing and not the other. I picked up some 700Cs locally today and they did not at all fit. I'm going to go back tomorrow for the 26x1.5s, I guess.

    Wow.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Joshua A.C. New's Avatar
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    That makes more sense to me. 700c is pretty much the next size up. It's like trying to wear the wrong size shoe.

    Hey, people who know more than me: l0rca is in Europe. Does that mean he'll be more likely to find 650c tubes? Will they fit in 26" tires?
    Joshua A.C. Newman,
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  16. #16
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    So you have a 700c front and a 26" rear.Kinda unusual, but I know there are some womens bikes that use an odd combo like that-24" front,700c rear.
    I can see the point of the taller 700c -it will span dips better and the 26" will give more traction as a drive wheel.Off road motorcycles do the same thing-tall skinny front,small fat rear.
    Schwalbe makes some tires that make great claims to be resistant to burrs, but I think the tire liners are the best bet.Leave the goo alone-makes it tough to fix the flats.I ride in AZ every year.I had no idea what goat heads were until all 6 of our tire went out in the 1st 400 yards(and this was in a city!!-Flagstaff).I repaired 20 holes in the 6 tires!! Dogs don't like the goatheads either!!
    Luck,
    Charlie

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    I've compared the wheels, and they seem to be equilateral. The tubes that I've taken off appear identical as well. What sort of problem could this be? The 700Csx28 were too large and narrow for these wheels. I'm assuming that the 26x1.5 or 26x2.1 are shorter wheels with larger widths, designed for mountain bikes and the sort, right?

    I'm thinking that I am dealing with 26x2.1 tires here, and some slightly shorter tube size. Should I pick up both 26x1.5s and 26x2.1s? In fact maybe I should pick up those 26x1.95s instead?

  18. #18
    Domestic Domestique UnsafeAlpine's Avatar
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    Sounds to me like a incorrectly marked front rim. If you go with the 2.1 size, they'll be a little thicker when fully inflated. Good luck.

  19. #19
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    What about the size/markings on the tires themselves?

  20. #20
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    700c will have 622 on it.This means that it is 622mm-(62 cm)-in diameter.The 26" will have 559-(55.9 cm) on it.Both the rims and the tires will have either 559 or 622 on them.
    The 700c-622 rim should be at least 2" taller than the 26" 559 rim.Have you held them side by side-it should be dead obvious if you hold them side to side.
    My 26" 559 rim is actually 22.5" from top of rim to top of rim(this is bigger-maybe 15 mm) than 559mm because the 559mm is from the rim botton to rim bottom).
    My 700c- 622 is actually 25.25" from rim top to rim top.
    Measure them-you don't have to be exact-we will them immediately know what rims you have.
    Let us know,and we'll know right away what to tell you to get.
    Occasionally someone will put a 700c rim on the front of a 26" forked bike-or even change out the forkto a 700c fork.It screws up the brake shoe position if you put a 700c rim on a 26" fork.It CAN BE DONE WITH EXTREMELY LONG REACH CALIPERS, BUT I doubt this happened here.
    Measure-let us know.Or just let us know how much taller one is than the other-if you can't measure.Eyeball it.
    Luck,
    Charlie

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveSANYYZ View Post
    What about the size/markings on the tires themselves?
    Both tires are marked 26x2.1.

    Today I went out and bought some 26x1.9 somethings, and while they're slightly narrower than my previous tubes, they fit and I was able to go for a ride today without a problem. So I'm guessing some 26x2.1s would be perfect. I have some backup tubes now as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by phoebeisis
    700c will have 622 on it.This means that it is 622mm-(62 cm)-in diameter.The 26" will have 559-(55.9 cm) on it.Both the rims and the tires will have either 559 or 622 on them.
    The 700c-622 rim should be at least 2" taller than the 26" 559 rim.Have you held them side by side-it should be dead obvious if you hold them side to side.
    My 26" 559 rim is actually 22.5" from top of rim to top of rim(this is bigger-maybe 15 mm) than 559mm because the 559mm is from the rim botton to rim bottom).
    My 700c- 622 is actually 25.25" from rim top to rim top.
    Measure them-you don't have to be exact-we will them immediately know what rims you have.
    Let us know,and we'll know right away what to tell you to get.
    Occasionally someone will put a 700c rim on the front of a 26" forked bike-or even change out the forkto a 700c fork.It screws up the brake shoe position if you put a 700c rim on a 26" fork.It CAN BE DONE WITH EXTREMELY LONG REACH CALIPERS, BUT I doubt this happened here.
    Measure-let us know.Or just let us know how much taller one is than the other-if you can't measure.Eyeball it.
    Luck,
    Charlie
    Yep, measured them several ways -- same diameter and width. I'm guessing the markings on the one wheel was a lovely error.

  22. #22
    Senior Member Joshua A.C. New's Avatar
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    Tubes are stretchy. You don't need to be super-concerned with the dimensions. It sounds like you worked it out!
    Joshua A.C. Newman,
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  23. #23
    Si se Puede!!!....Ahuevo! gr23932's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by l0rca View Post
    Southern Spain, in Rota. I'm in the U.S. military; I live on base.
    What???? You're still able to ride while us poor *******s here in S.H.A.P.E Belgium freeze. Lucky you for being in the Navy and being able to be stationed on Coasts.

  24. #24
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    S.h.a.p.e?

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