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  1. #1
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    Bought Ultimate Elite Pro Workstand/Questions

    I just bought this highly rated work stand & had some questions about it to those of you that also have it. With the bike on it in a typical position it leans inward slightly, but I suppose this is normal due to the flexing of the telescoping tubes & the clutch of the head not engaging evenly. The ratcheting clamp is not quite the easy one touch release I imagined. I find the push button release only works well as long as the jaws aren't clamped real tight, but then the bike can still slip in them. If clamped tight enough where it feels like a good grip the push button release require alot more force to disengage the jaw. Is this normal?

    What kind of work would not be suitable for workstands like this? It's my first one where before I would just do maintenance with the bike against a wall or upside down on seat & handlebars. I imagine anything requires alot of torque would not work well like BB, crank arms, & pedals.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ric0h View Post
    I have a question for you, how much was that workstand?
    $213 shipped with bag from Performance with their Christmas 20% off coupon. Would've been less if they they allowed the shipped to store option, but a least I got it in two days with Fedex Ground. Otherwise Jensonusa has it for $230 w/bag or $210 w/o & I think free ship. The bag is pretty decent & I think worth the extra $20.

  3. #3
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    "The ratcheting clamp is not quite the easy one touch release I imagined. I find the push button release only works well as long as the jaws aren't clamped real tight, but then the bike can still slip in them. If clamped tight enough where it feels like a good grip the push button release require alot more force to disengage the jaw. Is this normal?"

    I've made it a habit to unscrew the clamp one turn or less and the release works much easier.

  4. #4
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    So my experience with the clamp is normal. I figured it would be easy regardless, but yea loosening the grip a bit & then it works as advertised.

  5. #5
    Senior Member George's Avatar
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    The knob on the back has to be tight or that will make it lean. As far as the clamp that holds the seatpost. I open it about 2", put the seatpost in and grab the both sides of the clamp and squeeze it together and then tighten it. If you really have a heavy bike, something like 35# or more, I'll leave the stand down about a foot. You picked a very good stand, good luck.
    George

  6. #6
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    I have the same stand and the only job I don't leave the bike in the stand for is bottom bracket removal/installation.

    When doing an overhaul, my first item is to remove the chain and pull the crank arms off. Then I set the bike back on it's wheels to remove the bottom bracket as the required force is higher than I want to subject either the work stand or seatpost or frame tubing to. After that, everything can be done with the bike mounted in the stand.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    I have the same stand and the only job I don't leave the bike in the stand for is bottom bracket removal/installation.

    When doing an overhaul, my first item is to remove the chain and pull the crank arms off. Then I set the bike back on it's wheels to remove the bottom bracket as the required force is higher than I want to subject either the work stand or seatpost or frame tubing to. After that, everything can be done with the bike mounted in the stand.
    I assume you are saying that you do the chain and crank arms with the bike upside and the saddle and bars on the floor?

    It's a great stand youthcom. I am a little jealous . I have the Pro, not the Pro Elite. It would have been nice but an extra $60 for the clamp was not worth it for my personal use. I found the Pro clamp aggravating at first also. It's quick slide did not work intuitively. After a few uses I did get used to it though.

    The only clamp I like better is the one on the Park PRS-3, but that is priced for production/shop work and is not portable.
    Last edited by masiman; 12-29-07 at 10:16 AM.

  8. #8
    use your best eye kenhill3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by masiman View Post
    I assume you are saying that you do the chain and crank arms with the bike upside and the saddle and bars on the floor?
    I think you need to reread Hillrider's post!
    "I tell you, We are here on earth to fart around, and don't let anybody tell you any different." - Kurt Vonnegut jr.

  9. #9
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    Just noticed an dent on one of the legs. Looks only cosmetic, but annoying being new & all. They should've design the screws there to be flush or maybe a spacer on the legs. The legs also have a rather thin wall (maybe .030").
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
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    The legs need to be spread out to their maximum position for stability and to reduce lean.
    I expect any problems you have will go away with a bit more experience with the stand, that was how it went with me.

    Al

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by youthcom View Post
    What kind of work would not be suitable for workstands like this? It's my first one where before I would just do maintenance with the bike against a wall or upside down on seat & handlebars. I imagine anything requires alot of torque would not work well like BB, crank arms, & pedals.
    For "high torque" operations, you may have to brace the bike with a free hand. This doesn't defeat the purpose. The bike is still held in the air where it convenient. For cartridge bottom brackets, you can take off the rear wheel, wrap your arm around the seat tube and use it to brace the splined tool while the other works the wrench.

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