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Old 01-06-08, 03:12 PM   #1
ginsoakedboy
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Solvent to strip dry/wax lube?

I recall reading that if you were going to stop using dry chain lube and switch to traditional lube, that you needed to use something specific to completely strip all the dry lube away first. I didn't pay much attention at the time, and now I can't find that information. Anyone know?
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Old 01-06-08, 10:37 PM   #2
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I recall reading that if you were going to stop using dry chain lube and switch to traditional lube, that you needed to use something specific to completely strip all the dry lube away first. I didn't pay much attention at the time, and now I can't find that information. Anyone know?
Mineral spirits or kerosene would work well. I doubt that you'd need to remove it to switch to another lube however. Most all lubricants have a carrier solvent anyway and that would remove the wax based lube also.
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Old 01-07-08, 03:19 AM   #3
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Thanks. I would think either of those would work too. But I do recall reading that something specific was required or the residual paraffin won't let the oil penetrate or adhere. Maybe it was just B.S., but I seem to recall that the info came from a fairly reputable source, like maybe Barnett's? I wish I had taken note of it when I saw it, but I have been so happy with T-9 that I never figured I would want to switch to a wet lube.
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Old 01-07-08, 04:48 AM   #4
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Why are you switching?
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Old 01-07-08, 07:44 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Mineral spirits or kerosene would work well. I doubt that you'd need to remove it to switch to another lube however. Most all lubricants have a carrier solvent anyway and that would remove the wax based lube also.
Yep, just oil it and go. It will probably take a few applications for it to saok in and dissolve the wax, but no real need to remove the chain and clean in solvent.
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Old 01-07-08, 09:12 AM   #6
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Why are you switching?
The dry lube isn't standing up to the muck/salt/chemicals of the winter slop.
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Old 01-07-08, 12:53 PM   #7
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Thanks. I would think either of those would work too. But I do recall reading that something specific was required or the residual paraffin won't let the oil penetrate or adhere. Maybe it was just B.S., but I seem to recall that the info came from a fairly reputable source, like maybe Barnett's? I wish I had taken note of it when I saw it, but I have been so happy with T-9 that I never figured I would want to switch to a wet lube.
It's all part of the same class of compounds so it shouldn't have any issue with another lube penetrating.
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Old 01-07-08, 04:33 PM   #8
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Simple green variants at 30% to 50% with water strip paraffin based gunk out of
my chains very nicely. Straight simple green allowed to dry in place will strip paint
off metal. Ie rinse everything with water after using SG, and if you are worried about
water, follow with an isopropyl alcohol rinse to strip out the water.
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Old 01-07-08, 04:43 PM   #9
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Use Prepsol. Some lubes contain "bad" silicones and Prepsol is the only way to remove it. It's what auto painters use so there's no "fisheye" effects in the paint or possible future paint separation from any silicones...also cleans off wax, oils, and whatever. Can buy it at any of the larger paint supply stores, auto paint or detailing supply stores.
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