Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    RT
    RT is offline
    The Weird Beard RT's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    COS
    Posts
    8,532
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Smaller cassette - new chain?

    I'll be moving from a 12-34 SRAM 9-speed cassette to an SRAM 11-26. Which chain would you recommend, and will I have to shorten it to accommodate the smaller cassette?

  2. #2
    Senior Member SweetLou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    2,114
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes, you will need a shorter chain. I have never tested this, but I have heard that you should replace the chain when you get a new cassette, unless the chain has just a small amount of distance on it. I'm not sure if this is true, just something I have heard.

  3. #3
    Low car diet JiveTurkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Corvallis, OR, USA
    My Bikes
    2006 Windsor Dover w/105, 2007 GT Avalanche w/XT, 1995 Trek 820 setup for touring, 201? Yeah single-speed folder, 199? Huffy tandem.
    Posts
    2,401
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Actually, if you keep the same derailleur on, you don't have to shorten the chain. Your drivetrain won't know the difference, it'll all be the same except it will just think you're not using the biggest few cogs. That being said, I'd shorten it anyway because there's no need for the extra length. Edit: Like SweetLou said, you should get a new chain if the cassette has a decent number of miles on it, otherwise the new cassette will wear faster to match the stretched pitch of the old chain. You can keep the old cassette and chain as a backup or sell them together for a few bucks. Oh yeah, and most any 9-speed chain will work, but SRAM will say their cassettes and chains work best together.
    Last edited by JiveTurkey; 01-14-08 at 03:02 AM.

  4. #4
    RT
    RT is offline
    The Weird Beard RT's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    COS
    Posts
    8,532
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks guys. Is there a way to calculate based on my max/min number of total teeth how long my chain should be?

  5. #5
    Low car diet JiveTurkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Corvallis, OR, USA
    My Bikes
    2006 Windsor Dover w/105, 2007 GT Avalanche w/XT, 1995 Trek 820 setup for touring, 201? Yeah single-speed folder, 199? Huffy tandem.
    Posts
    2,401
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I use Sheldon's method: http://sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html#chain

    Wrap the chain around the largest chainring and largest cog (bypassing the rear derailleur). Find a length that is just long enough to connect (inner plate to outer plate), then add one full link (inner plus outer).

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    736
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JiveTurkey View Post
    I use Sheldon's method: http://sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html#chain

    Wrap the chain around the largest chainring and largest cog (bypassing the rear derailleur). Find a length that is just long enough to connect (inner plate to outer plate), then add one full link (inner plus outer).
    The Sheldon Method is basically the SRAM Method, also known as "Big + Big + 2", i.e. wrap the chain (without dérailleur) on the big chainring + big cog, and add 2 links (what you call "one full link (inner + outer)". Interestingly, the Shimano Method is different, and insensible to largest cog dimension: big chainring + smallest cog, ensure the 2 RD pulleys are in a vertical line. Also interesting: for "smallest cog of 15 or 16T"(!), they revert to the SRAM Method (big + big + 2).

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •