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Old 01-16-08, 03:55 PM   #1
maltess
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the frame

Heelo, I know this a beginner stupid question, But I need to know something about it. I been thinking a bike is actually the frame with whatever components you can have. Do you think this is true? mean, the responsiveness or performance of a bike is actually because of the frame desing? of course if I have a goog bike, letīs say a madone, the performance wil improve in top models with better components. Buyt in general , what can be the frame design in the overall performace of a bike?

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Old 01-16-08, 05:19 PM   #2
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a semi yeah to the question

While the Frame may be the heart and soul of the bike the group is very important. Wheels, efficient shifts play huge role. That being said a Dura Ace Huffy is still a huffy.

So I guess I would agree
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Old 01-16-08, 06:39 PM   #3
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I disagree. I think that the most important element of a frame is that it fits the rider and is well constructed.

In terms of "performance" it's the engine that matters on a bike, just like with a car.

On a bike, the rider is the engine and the bike is the transmission. The transmission doesn't make the car go any faster, but just utilizes the power produced by the engine.
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Old 01-16-08, 09:55 PM   #4
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So what if would happen if I get a MTB and change the velocity gear to a road bike, I mean bigger crank etc.
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Old 01-18-08, 07:42 PM   #5
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So what if would happen if I get a MTB and change the velocity gear to a road bike, I mean bigger crank etc.
You would be able to go faster assuming you have no compatibility issues and the leg strength.

If you primarily ride on the road, the bike might be more comfortable (geometry wise, not material wise as in steel in more comfy), heavier, studier, and less aerodynamic than a regular road bike.
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Old 01-21-08, 06:11 AM   #6
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Ok, thakns a lot, so any frame is capable to adapt different gears if you want to do that. Someone told me onece that an hybrid bike could not handdle road bikes gears, the bigger crank etc. I was not sure if this this true or not

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Old 01-21-08, 08:33 AM   #7
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The frame geometry is the major determinant of the handling characteristics of the bike, influenced to a lesser degree by the tires.

The drivetrain and the brakes are what determine how power is applied to the frame, which is a major determinant of the performance, in terms of speed.

But it is the engine that is the limiting factor in both handling and performance.
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Old 01-21-08, 01:24 PM   #8
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Ok, thakns a lot, so any frame is capable to adapt different gears if you want to do that. Someone told me onece that an hybrid bike could not handdle road bikes gears, the bigger crank etc. I was not sure if this this true or not

best regards
Some bikes have chainstays that won't accommodate larger chainrings...the rings will hit the chainstay. You could get around this by using a longer bottom bracket axle but if it's too long, you have chainline problems. Some chainstays have to be manipulated to keep the arms from hitting them but those are, thankfully, rare.

There are ways to get around this. You can use an 11 tooth outer cog on the cassette and a smaller chainring...like a 48 or 50...and still get sufficiently tall gears. Not many people need a 52/11 (127" gear with 700C wheels). I've had one and very rarely used it. A 48/11 (117" gear) is still tall for us mere mortals And a 48 tooth chainring probably won't have a problem with any chainstays...even on mountain bikes.
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Old 01-28-08, 08:27 AM   #9
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thank you so is nothing like the frame is going to break or something, just finding the right fits
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Old 01-29-08, 01:20 PM   #10
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Yep!

I'm actually a big fan of mountain bike frames with slick tires and few, wide-ranged gears for a city bike. It's an odd configuration, but it's resilient, maneuverable, and as fast as you can go in town. And the short MTB frame means that you don't crack your nuts if you suddenly find yourself off saddle and pedals as in a missed hopped curb.
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