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Old 02-11-08, 10:17 PM   #1
Crankcousins
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Tips on truing a bike wheel. (need help)

Can anyone tell me how to do it? or any good tips?

The only tool I got its a multi sized, thingy for the wheel to tighten or lossen. ( But I heard that will do the trick)
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Old 02-11-08, 10:26 PM   #2
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It will work, but I recommend getting "proper" spoke wrenches. There will be less chance of rounding a nipple. As with anything bicycle related, Sheldon Brown (mhrip) is the man.
Wheel truing
Wheel building
A truing stand is also recommended, but it can be done using your bike forks/brake pads, but a truing stand makes things much easier, at least for me it does.
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Old 02-11-08, 10:40 PM   #3
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Also, to do truing, the wheel must be in the bike right?
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Old 02-11-08, 11:30 PM   #4
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Also, to do truing, the wheel must be in the bike right?
The wheel is easiest to true if it's mounted in a truing stand. Failing that, you will need to mount it on the bike.
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Old 02-11-08, 11:32 PM   #5
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yeah.. get a proper spoke key and some oil..

have a look at parktool.com i'm sure they have tips or something. It can either be done on the bike or a truing stand.
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Old 02-12-08, 05:47 AM   #6
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The number one aspect to wheel truing and the one which is most overlooked by a newbie is spoke tension. Getting a wheel laterally true (side to side) is easy, radially true (up and down) a bit tougher and spoke tension a bit of an art and science combined. If your wheel looks fine but the tension is off, a couple of rides will render it really whacked out. Ideally you'd want to use a tensionmeter, but plucking the spokes to determine relative tension is ok in a pinch. You can true a wheel on the bike fine, though a stand is preferred. Poke around the net, far better instructions than I can give here. Just take your time, go gradually and eventually you'll get the hang of it.
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Old 02-12-08, 09:24 AM   #7
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The number one aspect to wheel truing and the one which is most overlooked by a newbie is spoke tension. Getting a wheel laterally true (side to side) is easy, radially true (up and down) a bit tougher and spoke tension a bit of an art and science combined.
And then there is centering the rim (dishing).
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Old 02-12-08, 04:44 PM   #8
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Invest in a truing stand and tensionometer if your serious. I have 4 bikes, 5 wheelsets, just one truing (already been done when stand and tensionometer came in) has covered the cost of the items. I got a PARK brand multi-size spoke wrench, which is a lot higher quality than the cheaper ones. The price was the same as two park single size wrenches, and it has all 3 common sizes...hasnt rounded any spokes

Then...learn how to true and tension the wheel That takes time to learn. If you take the time to check the wheels every so often, they will require less work to re-true/tension!!!
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Old 02-12-08, 04:52 PM   #9
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The number one aspect to wheel truing and the one which is most overlooked by a newbie is spoke tension.
Therein lies the rub!

If your rim is bent you might be able to pull it tight by using wildly differing spoke tensions but you'll never be able make a good wheel out of it. Is your rim bent?
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Old 02-12-08, 08:18 PM   #10
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Can anyone tell me how to do it? or any good tips?

The only tool I got its a multi sized, thingy for the wheel to tighten or lossen. ( But I heard that will do the trick)
Be sure your spoke wrench "thingy" fits the nipples securely so that you don't round off the shoulders. I like
Spokey brand wrenches.
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Old 02-12-08, 08:51 PM   #11
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Use multi tool. Will work 95% of times. Keep wheel on bike you can use brakes as guides to test for trueness. Spoke tension is not a HUGE deal for most of us. What most riders want is a wheel that does not rub on brake pads.

To straighten a wheel loosen spokes on same side as deviation and tighten to pull straight. It's not hard to get a wheel basically rideable. Of course you can spend mondo hours on it but with practice it will get easier and faster. My dad who raced back in 1948-52 could fix a tacoed wheel in shorter time than it takes me to type this post. Remember to pull deviation out loosen first and then tighten other side. Make it a regular check and by summers end you will be much much better at it.
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Old 02-12-08, 09:13 PM   #12
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Use multi tool. Will work 95% of times.
Multi tools don't generally include spoke wrenches.
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Old 02-12-08, 10:17 PM   #13
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Well, I practically just wanted to learn how to do it, just for general knowledge. Thats why I only spend 4 bucks on getting my tool.

I am a little confused, I should lossen which side first? the one where it looks bent?

BTW I dont believe my rim is bend, it just rubs horribly on the break pad/
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Old 02-13-08, 11:06 AM   #14
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If your immediate problem is that it rubs the brake pads, make sure your wheel is propperly mounted in the dropouts before you dink with the spokes. You probably already checked that, but just to be sure...

There is a lot of advice above and it soounds kind of confusing- don`t lose hope. It might be a good idea to check SB`s page or Park Tool and just follow one method. Honestly, I usually just tighten and only loosen when it looks to be necesarry. That said, I`m not an expert in this field- I`ve been doing it for my own wheels for a few years and it seems to work for me, but my technique may not be what the real experts would recomend. For occasional truing, I wouldn`t mess with a truing stand- I don`t want to spend the money and don`t really want something else taking up precious space. Whatever you do, good luck with your personal "wheel study" course. It`s a good thing to know even if you need to call in the calvary at times.
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Old 02-13-08, 01:06 PM   #15
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Another vote for Sheldon Brown's site as well as Park Tools. I have been doing my own for three years no after having trouble with LBS quality of labor. I learned much from these two sites. A truing stand is not absolutely needed but can be helpful. I bought one a couple of months after I began my wheel building education.
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Old 02-13-08, 11:08 PM   #16
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Okay, i preety much got all the basics, I just have one last question.

If i the little knob thingy left, the wheel will go a little left? or is it the other way around?

My wheel, is kinda messed up, so i really can't tell which way its going.
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Old 02-14-08, 12:14 AM   #17
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Okay, i preety much got all the basics, I just have one last question.

If i the little knob thingy left, the wheel will go a little left? or is it the other way around?

My wheel, is kinda messed up, so i really can't tell which way its going.
The nipple? Imagine the nipple to be like a nut (that`s pretty much what it is anyways). If you screw it onto the spoke, the length gets a tiny bit shorter just like when you screw a nut onto a bolt. Then think about which way you need to move the rim- you "shorten" the spoke/nipple on the side you want to move it to and the rim gets forced over slightly. A quarter turn per spoke is a good starting point to see if it`s working for you. You`ll likely have to do two or three adjacent same-side spokes for a bowed rim.
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Old 02-14-08, 09:26 PM   #18
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Thanks.
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