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  1. #1
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    Neat trick seen at the LBS

    Shooting the breeze at the LBS today and saw what I thought was a good idea. Hey it was 7f outside at the time, what else are you going to do? If this has been posted before, so be it.

    Using a high speed rotary tool with a sandpaper drum attached to surface the brake pads. Other than some dust this was a fast and quick way to get rid of all the road gunk that tends to stick in the pads. Did it with the pads mounted and the wheel removed. They were doing a spring tuneup on a bike.

  2. #2
    Senior Member BikeManDan's Avatar
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    I've used sandpaper by hand to "referesh" pads but some powered rotary action doesn't sound like a bad idea (at least to try)

  3. #3
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    Spin Forest! Spin! WNG's Avatar
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    Been using sandpaper and an wood block to do the same operation. I prefer to remove the pads and do each separately.
    Because you need to have a real steady hand and a lot of trust to handle a Dremel at 35k rpms around all that shiny expensive bits.
    “You meet the nicest people on two wheels!"
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  4. #4
    It's an old photo Boss Moniker's Avatar
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    I tend to do this when I get grit embedded in my pads, but I usually use a small hand-file. Really, it's not necessary to use a dremel, it'd save you 10 seconds max. Watch where all the filings go!
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  5. #5
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boss Moniker View Post
    I tend to do this when I get grit embedded in my pads, but I usually use a small hand-file. Really, it's not necessary to use a dremel, it'd save you 10 seconds max. Watch where all the filings go!
    I use a fingernail emery board. It's just the right grit. It makes it easy to keep the brake pads nice and flat. They're not only easy to find but, if you steal them from your wife, they're free.

  6. #6
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    Wouldn't that speed end up melting the pad?
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  7. #7
    You Know!? For Kids! jsharr's Avatar
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    Seems like good place to use a vibratory detail sander, if you had to have a power tool. Not sure why you would have one in the bike shop though. I too would be afraid of a slip with the dremel and I would be concerned about keeping the face of the pad square. Seems it could get wavy fast with a small round drum spinning at high speed.
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  8. #8
    Perineal Pressurized dobber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by operator View Post
    Wouldn't that speed end up melting the pad?
    Variable
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  9. #9
    Pwnerer Wordbiker's Avatar
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    Another trick is to cut and stick a piece of pressure-sensitive adhesive backed sanding pad to the rim. Move the wheel back and forth while holding the brake pads onto it and voila, fresh pads. Make sure to peel the sandpaper off when you're done.
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  10. #10
    You Know!? For Kids! jsharr's Avatar
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    Does the peel and stick paper leave adhesive residue on the rim?
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    Quote Originally Posted by colorider View Post
    Phobias are for irrational fears. Fear of junk ripping badgers is perfectly rational. Those things are nasty.

  11. #11
    Pwnerer Wordbiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsharr View Post
    Does the peel and stick paper leave adhesive residue on the rim?
    Not usually, but a little orange cleaner takes care of that.
    Quote Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
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  12. #12
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    I use this super 10 grit sandpaper. well its probably not 10 grit just really rough. Also skateboard grip tape works well too if you can get rems from a skate shop

  13. #13
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
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    Just wrap sandpaper around the wheel and tire outside edge, then just hold it in place with one hand. Then gently squeeze the brakes down on the paper after lining the paper up with the pads. At the same time move the wheel back and forth. It sands the pads perfectly and quickly. And nice and flat.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  14. #14
    Videre non videri
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    Heh! Funny that. Just the other day, I got the idea that using a soft rotary polish buffer to clean the bike (when dry!) could work.

  15. #15
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CdCf View Post
    Heh! Funny that. Just the other day, I got the idea that using a soft rotary polish buffer to clean the bike (when dry!) could work.
    The paint on bikes is a lot thinner than cars it would be too easy to go right through the paint.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

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    Emery board! Just don't let your S.O. catch you stealing her last one.

  17. #17
    Videre non videri
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2manybikes View Post
    The paint on bikes is a lot thinner than cars it would be too easy to go right through the paint.
    Uhm? Using a buffer (they're made from something resembling fluffy cotton) will surely be less harmful to the powder coat than the cleaning pads I otherwise use. If the paint is damaged by soft textile, then there's no way of cleaning it at all...

  18. #18
    The Red Lantern Rev.Chuck's Avatar
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    I clean/face pads with a ******* cut file. The coarse cut freshens a pad in about three strokes, takes off any lip and also seems to quite squeal prone pads.
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  19. #19
    Dog is my co-pilot 2manybikes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CdCf View Post
    Uhm? Using a buffer (they're made from something resembling fluffy cotton) will surely be less harmful to the powder coat than the cleaning pads I otherwise use. If the paint is damaged by soft textile, then there's no way of cleaning it at all...
    The softest flufiest material in the world, if it is going fast on a buffer and is being pressed down will go through bike paint surprisingly fast, one can even ruin car paint with that material. It's the speed of the buffer that makes the soft material more aggressive than it would seem to be. That's how people make that mistake, all the time. Even by hand with car wax one can go through bike paint easily. That's why I bring it up, it's surprising. It can be more agressive than cleaning pads by hand, because of the speed of the wheel.

    Using a buffer to clean a bike is silly anyway.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  20. #20
    Banned. timmyquest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsharr View Post
    Does the peel and stick paper leave adhesive residue on the rim?
    Hmm, sticky breaking surface. That sounds pretty solid to me

  21. #21
    Videre non videri
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2manybikes View Post
    The softest flufiest material in the world, if it is going fast on a buffer and is being pressed down will go through bike paint surprisingly fast, one can even ruin car paint with that material. It's the speed of the buffer that makes the soft material more aggressive than it would seem to be. That's how people make that mistake, all the time. Even by hand with car wax one can go through bike paint easily. That's why I bring it up, it's surprising. It can be more agressive than cleaning pads by hand, because of the speed of the wheel.

    Using a buffer to clean a bike is silly anyway.
    We're clearly talking about different things and different modes of use.

  22. #22
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    I have used the sandpaper wrapped around the wheel and held by hand mentioned by '2manybikes' (post13) before with great results. Just make sure you clean any grit off the pads with a good blast of air or a soft rag. Abrasive grit is hard on rims...

  23. #23
    My bike's better than me! neil0502's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rev.Chuck View Post
    I clean/face pads with a ******* cut file. The coarse cut freshens a pad in about three strokes, takes off any lip and also seems to quite squeal prone pads.
    +1.

    A flat file, larger than the pad height, seems a much more consistent (easier, too, IMHO) way than using a Dremel ... much as I love a good Dremel.

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