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  1. #1
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    quick release wheels

    If these quick release levers are not closed correctly, what can happen to the bike?

  2. #2
    I am a lonely visitor RegularGuy's Avatar
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    Worst case scenario: a wheel falls off. Fortunately, quick release skewers are reliable and easy to use.

    One end of the skewer screws into a fancy nut. The other end has a lever-actuated cam. Set the axle of the wheel in the drop outs. Screw the fancy nut down tight enough that when you turn the lever, it begins to tighten about halfway through it's travel. That is, you should begin to feel resistance when the lever is at about in line to the hub. Now, close the lever completely. Give the wheel a spin to make sure it's straight in the drop outs. Make sure your brakes are connected and you're gold.

    A quick visual check before each ride will tell you that the quick release skewer is still tight.

    edited for a minor point of fact.
    Last edited by RegularGuy; 10-06-03 at 08:26 PM.
    Religion is a good thing for good people and a bad thing for bad people. --H. Richard Niebuhr

  3. #3
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    ok, the reason I am asking is because I have a brand new bike... I was messing with the quick release lever. I basically opened it, moved the rear wheel out, put the rear wheel back in and closed the lever. Then I saw a little warning sticker saying that I should not attempt to undo the release unless I have thouroughly read the section in the manual. honestly, I hadn't. the guy at the bike shop demonstrated the technique and I figured it was pretty hard to screw up... so I went on my way. about 15 minutes later, I fell. Now, I am no advanced biker. I started again two days ago for the first time in 7 years... but I really cant tell why I fell. I was crossing a street, going into a smooth driveway for gosh sakes. all of a sudden the front wheel turned under me and the bike fell. I get up, the front wheel wont turn... one of the break pads has been bent into the wheel... I have no clue what happened. I almost think that the break thing happened before the fall, I am so unsure of why exactly I fell. Perhapse something with my lack of knowledge regarding the quick release? that is the only variable that I can come up with... anyway, taking the bike in 2morrow.

    concern number 2 (I am a paranoid dude)

    I call someone up to pick me up and he doesnt have a bike rack... we leave the trunk open (his car is a sedan, no room in back seat)

    we put as much of the bike as we can into the car and gently lower the trunk. We drive slowly, but the trunk can be clearly heard banging against the bike frame.

    So... is this time spent in the trunk bad for the bike/frame? I mean, it IS a freakin mountain bike... I dont think a little car trunk hitting it for the ten minute ride home would hurt it. ... but since I am asking about this other suff, I might as well ask about all my current worries.

    at any rate, the bike shop should be able to placate me tomorrow and get everything in tip top shape...

    man, this was a disappointing day.

  4. #4
    I am a lonely visitor RegularGuy's Avatar
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    Those warning stickers are to protect the manufacturer from product liability lawsuits. Quick release wheels are, as you suspect, hard to screw up...especially if the technique was demonstrated to you by a bike shop employee.

    I'm not sure what kind of brakes you have or how they were affected by your fall. The bike shop will tell.

    As for the frame, banging it repeatedly with a trunk lid can't be good for it. Inspect the frame. Are there dents? Structural damage is bad. Have the bike shop check that out, too. Is the paint chipped? A little touch-up paint can fix that.

    I'm thinking that you probably haven't done any real damage to the bike, but let the mechanic check it out.

    We all have bad days. We all fall for no apparent reason, too. Well, I fall for no apparent reason. Wear your helmet. Keep riding. Cheer up! All will be well.

    By the way, were you hurt?
    Religion is a good thing for good people and a bad thing for bad people. --H. Richard Niebuhr

  5. #5
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    Without really seeing the damage I would say--

    Screwing the rear wheel probably had nothing to do with the fall. Also, despite the warning label, I am sure that you did it fine. It is probably only there to ward off lawsuits. Since it is the rear wheel, you would have probably noticed problems shifting and pedalling if it was not seated correctly.

    Also, I can't imagine how your break pads bent into the wheel. Could it be the wheel is bent? If it is a poorly built wheel, it could have failed on you when you fell and now is pushed into the pad. Why you fell is a bit more a mystery...

    As for the car, the really important thing is to know the kind of sedan it was. For instance, Japanese components tend to ride better in the back of Japanese cars. Okay, just kidding. If you placed the bike into the trunk right side (drive side) up, then you are probably okay. But since you are taking it the bike shop anyway, they can give everything the once over.

    Take heart. You will learn more from the hard times than the easy ones. Just get back on the bike as much as you can. You have 7 years to get over.

    - Jeff

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