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  1. #1
    Shrek on a Trek white_feather's Avatar
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    tools needed for bike repair

    I want to build a tool box for my bikes and lock it so the family can't misplace my tools. I am not going to use the house tools for my bikes. I want my own set. That's right. I don't play well with others and I want my own sandbox. Should I get Park tools? Is the tool kit from Nashbar any good? Should I use Craftsman for the basics? What should i get?

  2. #2
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    "I want to build a tool box for my bikes and lock it . . " QUOTE.


    RULE NUMBER 1:

    Never loan your tools.

    RULE NUMBER 2:

    The Boiler Inspector is always right.

    RULE NUMBER 3:

    Never loan your tools.


    "Reguards",
    . J T

  3. #3
    Healthy and active twobikes's Avatar
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    I have never been one to buy sets of tools on the grounds the sets usually include things I will almost certainly never use. Rather, I prefer to buy a basic tool or two when I know I will need them and have some certainty that I will use the tool fairly often in the future.

    While there have been threads on this topic before, I would get a set of metric Allen keys, a cone wrench to fit your axle nuts, a good 8 inch adjustable wrench, three tire irons, a spoke wrench, a tool to loosen the retaining ring that holds the cassette in place, a chain tool, a crank removal tool, and maybe a bottom bracket tool for your bike. I personally like to follow torque recommendations, so I would want a torque wrench reading in inch pounds. I also very much like the little wear indicator tool Park sells for checking your chain wear. You could include a wrench that works for removing pedals and some metric sockets (six or twelve sided for 1/4" drive. These things should get you through most of what you will ever do.
    Last edited by twobikes; 03-01-08 at 02:08 PM. Reason: forgot something again
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by white_feather View Post
    I want to build a tool box for my bikes and lock it so the family can't misplace my tools. I am not going to use the house tools for my bikes. I want my own set. That's right. I don't play well with others and I want my own sandbox. Should I get Park tools? Is the tool kit from Nashbar any good? Should I use Craftsman for the basics? What should i get?
    Stage 1. Metric allen wrench set. You'll be surprised how much you can do with just that and maybe a needle nose pliers.

    Stage 2. Chain tool, cassette lock ring tool, chain whip, cable cutter. You'll also need a big creacent wrench.

    Stage 3. Bottom bracket tool(s) to match what you have. Crank puller. Hub cone wrenches. 17mm box end wrench. Spoke wrench.

  5. #5
    Afterburners...good idea Sapling's Avatar
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    Std answer - 'it depends' - on what you want to be able to do. Pre-event tweaking (just say no), regular basic jobs like drivetrain part swaps, full-up overhauls, etc.
    Park makes a basic roll-up tool set - good for starting point. Right away you'll need needle-nosed pliers though.
    Start w/ a reputable repair manual (Zinn's is my fave) and see what jobs you think you want to be able to tackle, get the tools for those.
    If you just get some basic tools, go ahead now and get a reasonable-sized tool box (and a lock) from Lowe's or Sears. A basic one w/ a large storage bin and a tray for smaller stuff is what you need.
    Get a stand too. It will save you a large pain.
    Last edited by Sapling; 03-01-08 at 05:36 PM. Reason: added info

  6. #6
    Senior Member Whatsisname's Avatar
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    Just buy the tools you need once you need them for a particular repair. Kinda sucks if you want to do your repairs at 2 am but otherwise its ok.

  7. #7
    Banned. timmyquest's Avatar
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    I think you should just buy them as you need them. This is how i've done it and slowly i've acquired the needed tools for just about any repair and i feel like i've hardly spent any money in doing it.

  8. #8
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    I have a Nashbar set that had all the bicycle specific tools I need. I had to go buy a 1/2 drive ratchet and a set of metric wrenches.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  9. #9
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    Yeah, buy the bike specific tools from your LBS as you need them. For non bike specific (like a set of metric allen keys), look for a good sale at Sears.

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    I disagree with the advice to buy tools when you need them.
    I would say, buy a kit and then add tools that are missing. You'll feel frustrated when you have to go to a shop in the middle of a repair.

    For example, Spin Doctor Pro Tool Kit for $110 from Performance Bike:
    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...tegory_ID=4218


    These tools are essential and high quality. Maybe, you won't use the bottom bracket tool, but it's required for the high-end modern bikes.

    Nashbar Elite Tool Kit is essentially the same thing, plus a chain cleaner.


    Also, when you don't have a specific bike tool, you usually try to use a generic tool. For example, when you don't have a cable and housing cutter, you can use pliers with bad results.
    Last edited by Barabaika; 03-02-08 at 11:50 AM.

  11. #11
    Pwnerer Wordbiker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barabaika View Post
    I disagree with the advice to buy tools when you need them.
    I would say, buy a kit and then add tools that are missing. You'll feel frustrated when you have to go to a shop in the middle of a repair.
    +1

    You'll also be paying more for individual tools than for a kit. Frugality can cut both ways. If you wait til later to buy a kit after purchasing individual tools, the cost benefit is less if the kit contains duplicates you don't need.
    Quote Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
    Ski, bike and wish I was gay.

  12. #12
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPMacG View Post
    Yeah, buy the bike specific tools from your LBS as you need them. For non bike specific (like a set of metric allen keys), look for a good sale at Sears.
    I see your Sears and raise you a Harbor Freight!
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  13. #13
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    LOL... I bought a lot of stuff from Harbor Freight about 10 years ago. The quality of their hand tools at the time was not so great. I broke just about all the box end wrenches. On the other hand I got a dial caliper and several micrometers that were very nicely made and incredibly inexpensive.

    But that was a long time ago. Are their hand tools better now? Their prices are certainly attractive.

  14. #14
    Geek Extraordinaire sivat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
    Stage 3. Bottom bracket tool(s) to match what you have. Crank puller. Hub cone wrenches. 17mm box end wrench. Spoke wrench.
    What needs a 17mm?
    I'd rather have a bottle in front of me than a frontal lobotomy.

    Sintesi Conversion Serotta Track

  15. #15
    Senior Member Joshua A.C. New's Avatar
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    That Spin Doctor setup looks pretty good. Those are all the tools that I had to go out and grudgingly purchase instead of working on my bike as I realized I needed them. Having them all at once is totally worth $110. (Shipping's gotta be a *****, though. I bet your LBS can order one for you.)

    Park has several varieties of assembled tool kits that you might consider, too. Ask your LBS about those.
    Joshua A.C. Newman,
    Passionate lover of construction

  16. #16
    Hey,that's your name dude Red Warrior's Avatar
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    Don't waste your bread on Park tools unless you need something pretty specific like a derailleur hanger straightner or something like that. I'm a diesel/refrigeration mechanic for a living and am not even close to impressed with the quality of their other stuff. They should be ashamed to charge the prices they do. You'll do just as well with "house" brands at Nashbar or Performance.


    Red

  17. #17
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by sivat View Post
    What needs a 17mm?
    17mm for axle locknuts

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joshua A.C. New View Post
    That Spin Doctor setup looks pretty good. Those are all the tools that I had to go out and grudgingly purchase instead of working on my bike as I realized I needed them. Having them all at once is totally worth $110. (Shipping's gotta be a *****, though. I bet your LBS can order one for you.)
    There is a coupon forum here where they usually can get 10% discount coupons from Performance Bike.
    Also, you can print the page from their website and go to the nearest Performance Bike shop. They usually accept the advertized price from the website.

  19. #19
    nowheels
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    I have a number of Spin Doctor tools that I have been using for the past few years.... they hold up well. The only one I wore out was my 6 yr old pair of cable cutters.

  20. #20
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    all you really need:




  21. #21
    Senior Member Joshua A.C. New's Avatar
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    (Ah, the forum doesn't like the word "*****". Please accept the following substitution.)

    (Shipping's gotta be an interanal pusfest, though. I bet your LBS can order one for you.)
    Joshua A.C. Newman,
    Passionate lover of construction

  22. #22
    Commuter Animal mike_khad1's Avatar
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    I started with this toolset from REI for $70. Over time, I
    have since replaced quite a bit of the items with Park Tool items and purchased more. But initially, it was a good general selection.
    Michael

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  23. #23
    Senior Member BCRider's Avatar
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    You'll end up with a bucket load of oddball tools if you work on old as well as new bikes. But I agree with the folks that say buy a basic set and then add as required. I'd go for the Spin Doctor kit or similar and to that add the regular combination open-closed standard metric wrenches when you find a nice slim but comfy to hold set of them in the small to medium sizes we use a lot. An 8 - 19 mm set will have a couple you never use but not many.
    Model airplanes are cool too!.....

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