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  1. #1
    zizeked brett jerk's Avatar
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    shaky front wheel

    hey I'm rocking an old bike with some no name rims on the front and when its secured (its a QR) it wiggles back and forth. I took it off the frame and took the qr out and its indeed the center (axle?) part thats shaky. I tried to take some wrenches to it, thinking that maybe I had to tighten the bolts on opposite ends but that did nothing (although that may be due to rust).
    What's my best move here? should rotating the bolts on the outside of the axle work and solve the problem (aka I just need to throw some grease in there to move em) or whats up? I live in the northeast so rust is a potential killer out here.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    You almost certainly have pitted cones. The trick is to find replacements that are an exact, or nearly exact, replacement for what you have now.

  3. #3
    zizeked brett jerk's Avatar
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    assuming I paid $15 for the rim, I should just throw it out and get a new one, right?

  4. #4
    Ferrous wheel
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    It sounds like the bearings might just be loose. Definitely don't throw out the rims; they have nothing to do with the problem.
    One thing about living in Santa Carla I never could stomach -- all the damn vampires.

  5. #5
    zizeked brett jerk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spider-man View Post
    It sounds like the bearings might just be loose. Definitely don't throw out the rims; they have nothing to do with the problem.
    how do i fix this?

  6. #6
    Senior Member due ruote's Avatar
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    Read this

  7. #7
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spider-man View Post
    It sounds like the bearings might just be loose. Definitely don't throw out the rims; they have nothing to do with the problem.
    The reason why I think he has pitted cones is because he said the locknuts were tight. Since I assume they were adjusted reasonably well at one time, the only way you could get a loose hub would be if one or both locknuts came loose or if one or both cones were pitted.

  8. #8
    2 B Frank w/U raleighrider75's Avatar
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    On each side of the hub there's 2 pieces.The cone and a jam-nut(or locknut).You have to loosen the jam-nut before you can screw the cone in.
    Sometimes loose cones are a sign that they are pitted and the only way for the wheel to run smoothly is to run with them slightly backed off.Was it that way when you got it?If you tighten it back up and you hear funny noises.They're not that funny because you'll have to replace the cones(or run with a shaky wheel).

  9. #9
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
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    Keep in mind, that the QR will compress the axle slightly and cause the bearings to tighten up to some degree. It basically takes some practice by trial & error to get the feel of "how much".

  10. #10
    Member killsmechadead's Avatar
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    A bit of bicycle terminology for you:
    I assume that when you say "rim" you mean "wheel". The rim is just the outer part of the wheel. The inner part is the hub. The axle is inside the hub and that's the part that is giving you the problem.

  11. #11
    zizeked brett jerk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by killsmechadead View Post
    A bit of bicycle terminology for you:
    I assume that when you say "rim" you mean "wheel". The rim is just the outer part of the wheel. The inner part is the hub. The axle is inside the hub and that's the part that is giving you the problem.
    thanks. some day I'll sit down and figure out all the terms, but I've managed pretty well on my own this far without em

  12. #12
    Senior Member Joshua A.C. New's Avatar
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    It's confusing the hell out of me, actually. It'll do you fine until you have to communicate with someone else.

    I just wrote a whole big thing, then realized that I was describing the Park instructions, which you've already got. So, uh, do what they say.

    Also on the Park site is this bike map which you can use to both get really decent wrenching advice and to learn the part names. Sheldon's bike glossary is also extraordinarily useful.
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  13. #13
    Bikaholic blamp28's Avatar
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    Your hub (the assembly in the center of the wheel) needs to be rebuilt most likely. You will probably need cones and possibly cups(not available for many hubs) and certainly bearings. Parts could cost 20 - ? $ easily. You mentioned that you paid $15 for the wheel. Now you know why. If it is a decent mid level or above wheel, I would try to rebuild it. If it is not, I would consider the $15 as a tuition instalment in the school of hard knocks.

    As an example, If this is a 105 Hub with a decent Mavic rim and you only need cones and bearings to make it right, I would spend the 20 -30 on parts and end up with a serviceable wheel. If on the other hand, it is a dept. store level rim with bad bearings, you have a learning wheel. Take it apart and see how it works. You have nothing to loose. A lower end wheel in that condition is virtually worthless and would cost more to repair than to replace.

    Good luck and let us know how it goes.
    Trek Fuel XC MTB, Giant OCR Road Bike, Rans Screamer - Tandem

  14. #14
    zizeked brett jerk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blamp28 View Post
    Your hub (the assembly in the center of the wheel) needs to be rebuilt most likely. You will probably need cones and possibly cups(not available for many hubs) and certainly bearings. Parts could cost 20 - ? $ easily. You mentioned that you paid $15 for the wheel. Now you know why. If it is a decent mid level or above wheel, I would try to rebuild it. If it is not, I would consider the $15 as a tuition instalment in the school of hard knocks.

    As an example, If this is a 105 Hub with a decent Mavic rim and you only need cones and bearings to make it right, I would spend the 20 -30 on parts and end up with a serviceable wheel. If on the other hand, it is a dept. store level rim with bad bearings, you have a learning wheel. Take it apart and see how it works. You have nothing to loose. A lower end wheel in that condition is virtually worthless and would cost more to repair than to replace.

    Good luck and let us know how it goes.
    I paid $15 for the wheel at my lbs, bought it used. I've gotten a good chunk of use out of it and I won't feel bad at all about going to buy another $15 wheel.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
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    Go buy a cone wrench and disassemble and inspect the parts yourself. If the cones and races are good, repack the hub with new grease. MY LBS charges $.05 per ball bearing. I find it simpler to just replace with new ones rather than take the time to inspect them all with my bad eyes.

  16. #16
    Bikaholic blamp28's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brett jerk View Post
    I paid $15 for the wheel at my lbs, bought it used. I've gotten a good chunk of use out of it and I won't feel bad at all about going to buy another $15 wheel.
    My point is that if it were my wheel, I would fix it or at least try to fix it if it is a wheel of decent quality components and the spare parts are readily available. Such a wheel may cost minimal dollars to make rideable for many many miles. On the other hand, if it is an entry level wheel or a decent wheel with severely worn cups. Keep it as a learning wheel and buy another.

    If your intent is to buy another used wheel from the LBS, at least pay for a repacking of the wheel before you take it home so you don't get a repeat of this. A little maintenance money up front usually can prevent more headaches down the road.
    Trek Fuel XC MTB, Giant OCR Road Bike, Rans Screamer - Tandem

  17. #17
    Senior Member Joshua A.C. New's Avatar
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    Or buy the wheel and pack the bearings yourself. It's a ten minute job and you'll learn a new thing.
    Joshua A.C. Newman,
    Passionate lover of construction

  18. #18
    zizeked brett jerk's Avatar
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    thanks for the help guys, I guess the cones were rusty or something, I ended up taking the whole thing apart and putting it back together (same components) and I've had no problems in another two weeks of riding. weird how that works I guess. either way, thanks!

  19. #19
    Senior Member Joshua A.C. New's Avatar
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    You probably just needed grease, then. It's amazing what lube will do!

    AMAZING, I tell you!
    Joshua A.C. Newman,
    Passionate lover of construction

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