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Old 03-28-08, 10:53 PM   #1
greyghost_6
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Advantages/pros/cons of Thompson seatposts?

Other than probably extra strength, and maybe a longer warranty, what advantages or strengths do they offer that normal mid range seat posts don't offer? Sure they allow fine tune adjustments, but don't most seat posts do that anyway and hold the seat there perfectly? I take it that they are more geared for mountain biking, and if used for road its like driving a nail in with a sledgehammer (superior strength), but im seeing more and more road racers show off their Thompson. I'm wanting one on my road and asking myself, "why". And don't tell me that it comes with a little canvas bag, I can get one at the dollar store for....a dollar.
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Old 03-28-08, 11:03 PM   #2
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I can go to my bank and get a nice hefty canvas cash bag for free. It makes a perfect roll up saddle bag when secured with a toe strap (leather, of course) for that retro look, if you're into that sort of look.
My Salsa stem came with an even nicer canvas bag which fits perfectly into my jersey pocket.
I love canvas. I use a Thomson seat posts and stems.


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Old 03-28-08, 11:12 PM   #3
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Haha, funny thing is I have one of those bags right next to my desk here! I hope this thread doesn't turn into a "How much we all love canvas" thread...
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Old 03-28-08, 11:23 PM   #4
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Thompson offers their seatposts in nearly every size conceivable, in increments of .2 mm. They also have the 15 degree bent models. If you have an odd-size seat-tube, or a frame with stupid crazy geometry, Thompson is good, as well as being extremely light and strong.
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Old 03-28-08, 11:24 PM   #5
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Yeh, the canvas bags are nice, but the 2-bolt seatposts are pretty much the standard for the way to go.
Once you go Thomson, it will be hard to go back. Not bad ;-))))
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Old 03-28-08, 11:38 PM   #6
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I guess the things I like about Thomsons are:

1. The finish. Thomsons, in my opinion, just look nicer than most posts. Glossy, yet manly. Plus, cosmetically they hold up better than most posts I've used. A heavily used Thomson looks nearly as nice as a brand-new Thomson (this is especially beneficial when you're buying used to save a few bucks).

2. Adjustment. True, there are other posts out there that offer very fine adjustment, but again I have not personally used a post quite as good in this respect. Plus, there are numbered markings for adjusting the angle, so if you remember what number you like it set at then you can quickly dial in your saddle angle without a level or trial-and-error.

Alas, I no longer use Thomson posts on most of my bikes because I need more than the 16mm of setback their setback posts provide. And sliding the saddle far enough backward is not an alternative option, because of the larger clamp.
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Old 03-28-08, 11:48 PM   #7
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Same as above, I needed more than 16mm of setback. That's the only con I can think of. They are sexy!!!
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Old 03-29-08, 02:23 AM   #8
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Thompson:

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Old 03-29-08, 04:12 AM   #9
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I like my Thompson because it's the only quality seatpost that still made in 27.4mm. That's the price us vintage Waterford owners have to pay.


Tim
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Old 03-29-08, 04:47 AM   #10
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Thomsons are simply solid and reliable without weighing too much.

There are a lot of lighter posts out there but after trying a lot of them, I ended up with Thomson.

There are, as far as I can tell, no posts out there more solid/reliable. Due to construction I thought the Syncros would be similar, but the Syncros' bolts end up getting a bit bent (I think they're thinner).

Since I want a relatively light post that I put on and forget about, Thomson fits the bill. I have the same needs for a stem - but for stems I use Ritchey.

I even took off the stock USE Alien carbon post to put a Thomson on my bike. Heavier but more solid. I could have bought a zero setback Alien but I didn't think it was worth it, not with the Alien's clamp system.

If I were to upgrade, I'd get the Masterpiece. Otherwise no need.

I let the shop keep the bags when I bought my posts.

cdr
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Old 03-29-08, 06:14 AM   #11
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The only negative I can find with Thomson posts is if you need setback, they only offer 16mm to the mere mortals.

Maybe if you begged enough, they'll make you a custom more setback version. (because it is possible and they will do it, I just won't elaborate any further)
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Old 03-29-08, 07:18 AM   #12
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I guess I don't have that much experience with single-bolt posts, since some bad experience was the it was really hard to get the saddle angle I wanted. So I really like having two bolts for position adjustment, and the best ones mechanically IMO are the old Campy 2-bolt, and the Thomson.

I see Thomson posts as just a seat post. What makes it a MTB post or a road post? They offer, or at least did offer, two styles of saddle clamp, one claimed to be for MTBs. But I have several, with and without that clamp style, and all are fitting perfectly on our roadies.

It's just a part, use it where it works for you. Don't use it where it doesn't work.

Maybe I should Ebay the bags, since they are soo interesting!

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Old 03-29-08, 08:03 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by greyghost_6 View Post
Other than probably extra strength, and maybe a longer warranty.....
Those sound like enough advantages to justify one right there. The one-piece post and head is an obvious plus since there is no seam or weld to separate and the warranty is also a benefit but nearly never needed.

I chose the Thompson (set back) Elite since it was one of the few Al posts available in 31.6 mm when I bought mine two years ago. It's quite light, very strong, and was less expensive than the carbon posts being offered at the time. I still don't think carbon is a desirable material for seatposts and the Thompson has been great. I don't see that the Thompson "Masterpiece" series is worth the significant cost increase for a minor weight savings.

For another bike I bought more recently, I got an Easton EA50 Aluminum post in 31.6 mm. It was significantly less expensive than the Thompson but also has a one-piece post and lower saddle clamp design with a two-bolt saddle adjustment. It has about the same set back as the Thompson "bent" post. It's only available in an MTB 350 mm length but it was easy to cut down to about 250 mm for road bike use and doing so saved 60 grams. Even shortened, it's not as light or as elegant as the Thompson but has done everything a seatpost should at very reasonable cost.
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Old 03-29-08, 08:07 AM   #14
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I like the Thomson post because it is easy to set up and then can be safely forgotten forever.
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Old 03-29-08, 08:29 AM   #15
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I like the Thomson post because it is easy to set up and then can be safely forgotten forever.
With the sole exception of removing it once a year to clean and regrease, as for any other Al post.
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Old 03-29-08, 08:53 AM   #16
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I bought mine because it was the only quality post I could find available at the tme in 28 mm diameter.
No grease on mine because it's in a CF frame.

Al
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Old 03-29-08, 10:05 AM   #17
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I really like my Thomson seatpost. Part of it is undoubtedly psychological, but on the one modern bike I have that I spared no cost (so far), it just feels right to have a Thomson on there. For awhile, I had a Thomson stem on the bike, too, but for fit reasons I later went to a different brand on the stem.

Last edited by well biked; 03-29-08 at 05:41 PM.
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Old 03-29-08, 11:48 AM   #18
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Great posts and stems clearly, but for those interested they are parts made in the U.S.A. Macon, GA, to be precise, and they have a neat trail behind their building as well.
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Old 03-29-08, 01:44 PM   #19
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I don't have a Thomson, but I have post with a very similar (identical) clamp mechanism and another with different clamp mechanism. Next time I buy a post, I will definitely buy one with the type on a Thompson. Very easy to micro adjust the saddle tilt. The other can do it, but it's not as precise and elegant.

To me, Thomsons have a terrific reputation and are definitely premium priced and have some status value among those in the know. That isn't bad, because I have no doubt they set the standard for quality whatever that is. But frankly, I believe there are many excellent and similarly light posts and graphics and price may come into play as well.
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Old 03-29-08, 02:02 PM   #20
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I remember that Sheldon Brown said that he did not like Thomson seatposts. I don't recall the reason he gave, but that's enough to keep me from buying one.
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Old 03-29-08, 05:09 PM   #21
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I remember that Sheldon Brown said that he did not like Thomson seatposts. I don't recall the reason he gave, but that's enough to keep me from buying one.
I don't recall his reasoning but I'd bet it was due to the normal Thompsons having no setback and the "bent" Thompsons with setback have a minimum required extension so the "bend" stays above the seat tube.

There are no other mechanical objections Ii can even imagine and the Thompson's are relatively high priced but no where near what some others charge.
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