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  1. #1
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    which tools will I need for bb and hub overhaul

    I recently got a used bike, and the hubs and bb need looking at. I was going to have the lbs look at them, but the guy said i was looking at $50+ for just the bb (he wanted to overhaul it). I am thinking that if im going to spend that much already I might was well get the proper tools and do it myself. Tools are a one time expense and they should pay for themselves, so I dont mind spending a little extra. I wasnt sure if i should buy the tools individually or just get a kit.

    Some more info on which tools I need
    my current ride is a giant cadex 890i with a shimano deore lx group set ('90-'92 I think)
    the bb has a lock ring and needs one of those pin spanners. so I assume it is a cup and cone affair
    the hubs are cup and cones as far as i can tell.
    the dust caps on on the cranks have 2 holes in them, and i cannot figure how to get them off, maybe one of those pin spanners?

    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...bcat%3A%20Kits
    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...tegory_ID=4218
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/145...--21-Tools.htm

    Those are a few kits I was looking at, but I dont think any of them have pin spanners, and I have never bought a kit before so I am not really sure what to look for.

    Any help will be appreciated
    Last edited by ThreLittleBirds; 05-01-08 at 09:23 AM. Reason: found that basic tool kit questions were common and wanted to be clear this was a question about which tools were needed and how to get them in a cost effective way

  2. #2
    Senior Member swc7916's Avatar
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    I personally don't trust the quality of Nashbar or Performance branded tools; I don't have any experience to back up this prejudice, but I buy the same Parks tools that the pros use. With a kit you will get some tools that you will never use. What I have done - and what I would advise - is to purchase tools individually for the specific job and your bike. Eventually you will have a set of just the tools you need. One tool set that you will need for any bicycle is a good metric Allen wrench set; I like the Bondus hex keys.
    Last edited by swc7916; 05-01-08 at 09:42 AM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member CACycling's Avatar
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    Many tasks can be done with normal tools. I've rebuilt serveral C&C BBs with a large adjustable wrench, groove joint pliers and needle nose pliers. You will need to invest in a crank puller ($10 - $15).

    For hubs, you will need cone wrenches. I'm still using a set I've had since the 70's (and they are not high quality).

    A ride of your vintage probably has a freewheel and it will require a special tool if you plan to remove it. The type depends on the freewheel.

    You'll also want a good spoke wrench but most other stuff is just allen wrences, box or open end wrenches, screwdrivers, etc. which you may already have laying around.

  4. #4
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    I just bought Nashbar's comprehensive kit, I forget what they call it, pro or something. It's on sale for $130, so I figured why not. I got their stand too.

    I also used a coupon code from the coupons forum on here, and got additional money off.

    I'll let folks know how they are when I get them in.

  5. #5
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    I got the Sette ST-21 kit mentioned in the first post. It looks like at least 3/4 of the tools are bicycle-specific tools that I didn't have in my toolbox. The Shimano cassette lockring tool in the kit has a long centering pin, which is nice.

  6. #6
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    Instead of buying a kit I think it makes more sense to buy the tools you need when you need them. As components change, so do the needed tools. Of course many tools are universal and don't necessarily need to be bicycle specific.

    Al

  7. #7
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    this is what is what I think I will need

    X Park Tool Crank Puller PT-CWP6 $15.95 $15.95
    X Park Triple Spoke Wrench PT-SW7A $8.95 $8.95
    X Park Double Cone Wrench PT-DCW 13/15 $4.95 $9.90
    X Pedros Syngrease 3oz. PE-G3 $7.95 $7.95
    X Blackburn Frame Pump JB-FP S $23.95 $23.95
    Subtotal: $66.70

    Im hoping I can get the BB open with a lock jaw or channel lock

    My front hub has 13mm cones, i havent checked the back yet (ive read they are usually 15mm)
    I wasnt sure which spoke wrench would fit, and im hoping the tripple will have the one i need.

    Is there any thing I'm missing?

    oh and I still have no idea how to get these dust covers off:
    Last edited by ThreLittleBirds; 05-08-08 at 12:04 PM.

  8. #8
    Biking Viking. goatalope's Avatar
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    To get the dust covers off, I'd just use a screwdriver and hammer and tap them counterclockwise to unscrew them. This could scratch them a little, but they don't look pristine anyway.

  9. #9
    Small Member maddmaxx's Avatar
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    Usually you need 2 cone wrenches at a time, one for the cone and one for the locknut. This is because you have to hold the cone in place after adjustment while tightening the lock nut.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by swc7916 View Post
    I personally don't trust the quality of Nashbar or Performance branded tools; I don't have any experience to back up this prejudice, ...
    What silly advice! "I'm don't know what I'm talking about, but here's what you should do."

    What's even sillier is that the advice seems to have been taken (judging by the list above). There is no need to spend the money for Park or Pedro's when the same tools can be had in acceptable quality for much less.

    ThreLittleBirds, the current kits you list are for 10-speed and will have tools you don't need, and some you will. Look around a bit more (also, try the Search function here - there are pages and pages about tool sets) and see if you can find a 9-speed set that will have BB tools (esp. crank puller and 8mm wrench) you can use. The Park #2 pin spanner is good for the dust caps, but a long-nose pliers will work and probably already have those. Or drive two nails through a board.

    Forget the fancy grease. Go to your local auto parts store and get a tub of axle or marine grease for $4.

    Bike Tools etc. is a source in case you're not near a good one.
    Stupidity got us into this mess - why can't it get us out?

    - Will Rogers

  11. #11
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    Nashbar tools are fine and can be a good bargain. They have good sales, and I recommend you shop then if you can. Particularly their headset tool and their cable cutters are good. As far as pin spanners for dustcap removal, any brand should do. The rest, I suggest you shop the bargain bins at Lowes for hex keys and small adjustable wrenches. Sears has nice metric sets that they sell cheaply (like dumping the 7-piece Craftsman set to make room for the 8-piece set at twice the price.)

    With the exception of specialized tools like threaded headset wrenches, third-hand and fourth-hand tools and the like, much of the necessary tools can be had at the ordinary hardware departments.
    (I'm assuming you don't need really specialized stuff like chase/face tools.)

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThreLittleBirds View Post
    My front hub has 13mm cones, i havent checked the back yet (ive read they are usually 15mm)
    I wasnt sure which spoke wrench would fit, and im hoping the tripple will have the one i need.
    Not sure if this is a typo or not, but spoke wrenches and cone wrenches aren't the same thing. Spoke wrenches are used to true a wheel; they aren't going to help you overhaul a hub. You do need whatever size cone wrenches -- sounds like 13 and 15mm -- fit your particular hub though.
    "There is more to life than increasing its speed" -- Mahatma Gandhi

  13. #13
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    Not sure if this is a typo or not, but spoke wrenches and cone wrenches aren't the same thing. Spoke wrenches are used to true a wheel; they aren't going to help you overhaul a hub. You do need whatever size cone wrenches -- sounds like 13 and 15mm -- fit your particular hub though.
    Its not a typo I know that spoke and cone wrenches are very different and i need both. My hubs need an overhaul, and while my wheel is not out of true yet, several of the spokes are looser than they should be and I will need a spoke wrench for that (if it was just one I would use pliers, but there are too many for that)

    What silly advice! "I'm don't know what I'm talking about, but here's what you should do."

    What's even sillier is that the advice seems to have been taken (judging by the list above). There is no need to spend the money for Park or Pedro's when the same tools can be had in acceptable quality for much less.

    ThreLittleBirds, the current kits you list are for 10-speed and will have tools you don't need, and some you will. Look around a bit more (also, try the Search function here - there are pages and pages about tool sets) and see if you can find a 9-speed set that will have BB tools (esp. crank puller and 8mm wrench) you can use. The Park #2 pin spanner is good for the dust caps, but a long-nose pliers will work and probably already have those. Or drive two nails through a board.

    Forget the fancy grease. Go to your local auto parts store and get a tub of axle or marine grease for $4.
    I have been reading more and more about tools and I am more comfortable buying the cheaper brands after reading more carefully; it seems that most who bash cheap tools have avoided them and dont have much experience working with them. that list was more to find the correct tools, then to find the correct price
    The real problem with the kits, is that they are designed for a very different bike then what I have. I have cup and cone hubs and BB, a threaded fork, and 7speeds. the kits are made for cartrige hubs and BBs, threadless forks and 10-9 speeds. If someone could show me an "outdated kit" I would be most grateful, mean time I will keep searching.
    The axle grease I will try, thanks for that tip.
    I will try the long nose pliers, nails in board, and screw driver with hamer methods in that order and hopefully one will work.

    since the rear wheel needs work, I will need a tool to remove a cassette of this kind:

  14. #14
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    I bought the Spin Doctor Essential Tool Kit, and it's been fine for my purposes so far. I've used it to basically take apart my bike for cleaning and lubrication, and to occasionally re-true the wheel. I've been using it for a couple months, and it's been okay. I can see them not standing up to frequent, heavy use, but it's not like I run a bike shop.

    I can't speak to its suitability for older style headsets or bottom brackets.

    What you need to remove your cassette is a "cassette lockring tool" which mates with those splines, and a chain whip. Both are included in the SP Essential Kit. (or http://www.parktool.com/products/det...at=4&item=FR-5 and http://www.parktool.com/products/det...27&item=HCW-16 individually).

  15. #15
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    Some tools you can cheap out on some you are better off not doing that with.

    Chain tools can be poorly made. You don't hear many complaints about the Park versions.

    Chain whips can be cheaply made. In most instances they will work, for really tough removals, sturdier versions are required.

    Spoke wrenches should be well made, cheap ones can be out of spec and will round the nipples.

    I have not had a problem with any crank puller or cassette tool yet.

    I have found a Dualco grease *** to be very useful.

    Allen wrenches are almost required. A second set with ball ends makes some jobs easier. The Y allen wrenches will do many jobs very quickly.

    Cable cutters are nice but a dremel works very well too.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by masiman View Post

    Spoke wrenches should be well made, cheap ones can be out of spec and will round the nipples.
    So can the expensive ones. I'd buy two or three spoke wrenches of various sizes that grip the nipple all the way around, like the Spokey brand, red and yellow.

    Al

  17. #17
    Call me The Breeze I_bRAD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThreLittleBirds View Post
    this is what is what I think I will need

    X Park Tool Crank Puller PT-CWP6 $15.95 $15.95
    X Park Triple Spoke Wrench PT-SW7A $8.95 $8.95
    X Park Double Cone Wrench PT-DCW 13/15 $4.95 $9.90
    X Pedros Syngrease 3oz. PE-G3 $7.95 $7.95
    X Blackburn Frame Pump JB-FP S $23.95 $23.95
    Subtotal: $66.70

    Im hoping I can get the BB open with a lock jaw or channel lock

    My front hub has 13mm cones, i havent checked the back yet (ive read they are usually 15mm)
    I wasnt sure which spoke wrench would fit, and im hoping the tripple will have the one i need.

    Is there any thing I'm missing?



    oh and I still have no idea how to get these dust covers off:
    The triple spoke wrenches are annoying IMO. Get the one you need to fit the spokes on your wheel. If you don't know, the guy at the LBS will be able to tell you which one you need.

    13/15 is a good idea for the cone wrench. You'll also need a standard 15 and 17 (depending on your hubs, but probably) to go with.

    Skip the pedros grease, and get a lot more for less as others have said from the local auto supply store.

    Skip the frame pump and get a floor pump unless it's doing double duty as a take along pump. Even then it's still worth the investment to have both.

    Get a hozan lockring tool for your BB. You'll balk at the price, but only until you use it. You'll also need the appropriate tool for your adjustable cup. Again, the LBS can guide you here.

    You can get the dust covers off with a pair of needle nose pliers, or you can buy a tool for a few bucks to do the same thing.

    You'll also need a 14mm socket to remove the crank bolts (or an 8mm allen key) and a 16mm open end wrench to work the crank puller.

    If everything is in good condition, it's a pretty straightforward operation. If it's seized in there, then it'll be tough and you'll learn some tricks by the end. I'd start with the hubs if this is your first project.

    Good luck!

  18. #18
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    I got by for a while with a Spin Doctor Essential Tool Kit, which cost me around $40.

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