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  1. #1
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    Bike Sitting Aside for a Long Time...

    I have a bicycle, which has been sitting in my garage for a long time. Now I want to take it out and use it more. I was wondering what I have to be looking for to take care of to bring it back in shape: basically what does "dusting" mean in the bike world?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    What brand, year, condition, components? Possible to post pics?

    How long is a "long time"?

  3. #3
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by diuspater View Post
    I have a bicycle, which has been sitting in my garage for a long time. Now I want to take it out and use it more. I was wondering what I have to be looking for to take care of to bring it back in shape: basically what does "dusting" mean in the bike world?

    Thanks.
    You can probably just pump up the tires and go. Because they are mechanically simple, bikes don't have much go wrong with them from disuse. If it has been sitting on flat tires for years, you may need to replace the tires. Brake pads can also lose their elasticity but that takes years and years. Grease can dry out and harden but again that takes quite a while.

    Pump the tires up, check to see if they are cracked on the tread or sidewalls and go ride. If the tires are is poor shape, get some new ones. As you ride you'll notice things that are wrong. Fix them accordingly.
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Old School's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    You can probably just pump up the tires and go. Because they are mechanically simple, bikes don't have much go wrong with them from disuse. If it has been sitting on flat tires for years, you may need to replace the tires. Brake pads can also lose their elasticity but that takes years and years. Grease can dry out and harden but again that takes quite a while.

    Pump the tires up, check to see if they are cracked on the tread or sidewalls and go ride. If the tires are is poor shape, get some new ones. As you ride you'll notice things that are wrong. Fix them accordingly.
    Good advice. Another option is to take it to a local bike shop (we call them LBS around here) for a bit of TLC from a professional.
    But just riding it will tell you if additional maintenance may be necessary.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, "WOW! WHAT A RIDE!"

  5. #5
    The Improbable Bulk Little Darwin's Avatar
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    I agree with the above,. but just add the specific caution to not put yourself in a situation where you need to stop quickly until you have exercised the brakes enough to trust their functionality.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Joshua A.C. New's Avatar
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    Pics!
    Joshua A.C. Newman,
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  7. #7
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    "Dusting" in the bike world means "rusting".
    Chains rust very quickly, but they are relatively cheap. You need a chain tool to replace them.

    It's a good idea to adjust and/or change the cables and housing if the cables don't move smoothly.

  8. #8
    Vinyl Junkie mishmashmusic's Avatar
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    Be sure your brakes work before you ride, first and foremost.

  9. #9
    Rider of Bikes
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    Test the tires brakes and chain as said above. Don't really sweat it, just get out the door and ride. Welcome back.

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