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Old 05-03-08, 05:22 PM   #1
sp00ki
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ts-2 truing stand: overkill?

I'm going to buy a truing stand soon.
I just built a wheel using my friend's park tools ts-2.
i actually haven't used any other stands.
I'm seeing it priced at ~$180 (after shipping). Should i pick it up?
between my girlfriend and i, there are five bikes @ our place, and we ride daily. is this a good buy? is it overkill?
what others would you recommend? it seems really sturdy, and the different caliper surfaces are incredibly useful...
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Old 05-03-08, 06:01 PM   #2
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The TS-2 is an excellent stand. It is listed a a professional stand. There are less expensive ones on the market. You get what you pay for.
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Old 05-03-08, 06:12 PM   #3
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I have one of these Spin Doctor stands. I like it. I've used it and the tension meter to build a wheel, and keep the other wheels trued.

The Park tension meter is really useful. I'd rather have a cheap stand and the tension meter over the expensive stand and no meter.

I'd like to get a dishing guage, too. For now, I just flip the wheel in the stand and see if it's centered on the stand's centering guide. It's not as accurate as a guage, though.

If you tension your wheels correctly, they should stay in true for a long time. I haven't had to do anything to my road bike's wheels for probably 5000 miles or more now.

Last edited by rm -rf; 05-03-08 at 06:23 PM.
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Old 05-03-08, 08:12 PM   #4
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I have one of these Spin Doctor stands. I like it. I've used it and the tension meter to build a wheel, and keep the other wheels trued.

The Park tension meter is really useful. I'd rather have a cheap stand and the tension meter over the expensive stand and no meter.

I'd like to get a dishing guage, too. For now, I just flip the wheel in the stand and see if it's centered on the stand's centering guide. It's not as accurate as a guage, though.

If you tension your wheels correctly, they should stay in true for a long time. I haven't had to do anything to my road bike's wheels for probably 5000 miles or more now.
+1

Interestingly, I have the dishing gauge and not the tensiometer!

Wheelbuilding really asks for a suite of equipment. The TS-2 arguably must be used in conjunction with a dishing gauge. My wheelbuilding so far has used musical pitch for tension measuring, though I do wish I had a tensiometer. If your budget gives you a choice between just the TS-2 and a cheaper truing stand (I too use the Spin Doctor) with a dishing gauge and tensiometer, pick the latter. If you can afford a whole suite of shop-grade wheelbuilding tools, by all means go for it.

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Old 05-03-08, 08:34 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by sp00ki View Post
I'm going to buy a truing stand soon.
I just built a wheel using my friend's park tools ts-2.
i actually haven't used any other stands.
I'm seeing it priced at ~$180 (after shipping). Should i pick it up?
between my girlfriend and i, there are five bikes @ our place, and we ride daily. is this a good buy? is it overkill?
what others would you recommend? it seems really sturdy, and the different caliper surfaces are incredibly useful...
Get the TS-2 spooki, unless you're really hurting for money (I mean with those carbon drop flop and chops) and all. You'll thank me later.
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Old 05-03-08, 08:44 PM   #6
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If you are going to be building/truing a lot of wheels, then I say get the Park TS-2. If you are going to only work on your 5 bikes, then you really don't need such a good stand. I like the TS-2 because I can true a wheel a little faster on it. At home, I use the Spin Doctor one. It takes a little longer, but I only build a couple of wheels a year at home.
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Old 05-03-08, 09:35 PM   #7
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In the end, the only thing that a trueing stand does is to provide a stable place to measure from. The more expensive ones with all the bells and whistles may make the work go a little bit faster, but they really won't produce superior results.

If you're picky about wheel dish you'll need to get a separate dish gauge because the dishing function that's built into trueing stands isn't very reliable.
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Old 05-03-08, 10:43 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sp00ki View Post
I'm going to buy a truing stand soon.
I just built a wheel using my friend's park tools ts-2.
i actually haven't used any other stands.
I'm seeing it priced at ~$180 (after shipping). Should i pick it up?
I've built and trued many wheels using no more than a table for a reference and a flipped-over bike for a stand. But then, I learned to build and true on a TS-2. (Hey! Poetry!) It's not overkill if you're going to be building a few wheels for yourself, but I've had just as mus success truing the wheel on the bike with a clothespin for reference.

This is overkill:
http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cg...&item_id=VR-74
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Old 05-03-08, 11:44 PM   #9
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I've built and trued many wheels using no more than a table for a reference and a flipped-over bike for a stand. But then, I learned to build and true on a TS-2. (Hey! Poetry!) It's not overkill if you're going to be building a few wheels for yourself, but I've had just as mus success truing the wheel on the bike with a clothespin for reference.

This is overkill:
http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cg...&item_id=VR-74
Meh, anything more than using a fingernail can be argued as overkill, but the Park is a nice truing stand, makes wheel work much more pleasurable, is built to last and holds value well.

If you can afford it, get one. You won't need another.
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Old 05-04-08, 01:21 AM   #10
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just stick an old road fork in a table vise and call it a day
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Old 05-04-08, 07:39 AM   #11
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You need this one:
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File Type: jpg ts3b.jpg (9.2 KB, 73 views)
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Old 05-04-08, 07:40 AM   #12
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just stick an old road fork in a table vise and call it a day
That will work too.

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Old 05-04-08, 09:53 AM   #13
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Meh, anything more than using a fingernail can be argued as overkill, but the Park is a nice truing stand, makes wheel work much more pleasurable, is built to last and holds value well.

If you can afford it, get one. You won't need another.
+1.

I probably have more pairs of wheels than the OP or any sane person ought to have. However, I too believe the TS-2 is a luxury and not a necessity. Although I own a complete set of wheel tools (TS-2, tensiometer, 5 or 6 spoke wrenches, dishing tool, even a nipple driver), the only tool I believe is truly necessary is a good spoke wrench.

I remember back during my poor, starving college student days, I only had a Park spoke wrench and it's not even the SW-40 3-sided version, much less the fabulous but sadly discontinued all-metal DT spoke wrench; however, I trued all my wheels back then using the bike itself as a stand and the brake pads as the truing guides. I also did the flip-flop thing for checking dish, and the plucking-spoke thing for checking even and adequate spoke tension. I even trued the wheels of riding buddies that way. Necessity and poverty is the mother of MacGyverism!
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Old 05-04-08, 10:29 AM   #14
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I have the Spindoctor stand and have questions for those who use it. I typically use it more just to try to straighten out my wheels, and still need a LOT of practice. Anyhow, does it matter that the front prongs (that come out to meet the sidewalls of the rims) function and move independantly of one another? I was thinking of trying to attach som sort of caliper that would move them in unison...

or is there another way that you go about assuring you are straightening the rim and not screwing up the dishing?
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Old 05-04-08, 10:32 AM   #15
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Overkill?! The Park TS-2 isn't overkill. It's overrated. The self-centering mechanism doesn't work repeatedly. Buy a dishing tool, and get another wheel truing stand. Park's own Calvin Jones, head mechanic, has even commented to the fact that the self-centering mechanism is lousy. Do a search on google, this forum, another forum. Doesn't matter. Search. The TS-2 is a weighty, overrated piece of junk.
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Old 05-04-08, 10:46 AM   #16
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I have the Spindoctor stand and have questions for those who use it. I typically use it more just to try to straighten out my wheels, and still need a LOT of practice. Anyhow, does it matter that the front prongs (that come out to meet the sidewalls of the rims) function and move independantly of one another? I was thinking of trying to attach som sort of caliper that would move them in unison...

or is there another way that you go about assuring you are straightening the rim and not screwing up the dishing?
No, it doesn't matter that they move independently of each other. Some truing stands only have one arm. What you do is flip the wheel in the stand. For example, lets say when you have the wheel in the stand, the arm just touches the rim. Then you flip the wheel and the rim is now 1/2", then you know that to center this rim, it has to be moved over 1/4". Continue centering and truing until the wheel is straight and every time you flip the wheel, the arm is the same distance away.
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Old 05-04-08, 11:12 AM   #17
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[QUOTE=Mr. Fly;6634022 and it's not even the SW-40 3-sided version![/QUOTE]

I'd forgotten about the 3 sided spoke wrench. Makes my fingers hurt just thinking about it. What a POS!
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Old 05-04-08, 12:22 PM   #18
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Necessity and poverty is the mother of MacGyverism!
As is the situation.

A race mechanic can't always have the most deluxe, self-centering, all-accomodating super spiffy truing stand...nor does he always have the time (or even the need), yet somehow they always get the job done to a very high standard.

If you can afford the time/space/money for good tools, you will always choose them. If not you'll rely on knowledge and skill and improvisation. The more you improvise and rely less on crutches, the more your skills will grow. It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools.
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Old 05-04-08, 12:29 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by sp00ki View Post
I'm going to buy a truing stand soon.
I just built a wheel using my friend's park tools ts-2.
i actually haven't used any other stands.
I'm seeing it priced at ~$180 (after shipping). Should i pick it up?
between my girlfriend and i, there are five bikes @ our place, and we ride daily. is this a good buy? is it overkill?
what others would you recommend? it seems really sturdy, and the different caliper surfaces are incredibly useful...
I use a Minoura Workman Pro stand. It is great for personal use. The the more sturdy wheelstands like the Cyclus or the TS-2 are for a more intensive work enviroment; when several people use the same tool they don't personally own, that tool better be sturdy or it will break quickly.

If you want to build good wheels, then getter a cheaper wheelstand and use the rest on Jobst Brandt's book "The Bicycle Wheel" 3.ed., a dishing tool and perhaps a Park Tool TM-1 tensiometer too. Brandt's book is really good, but requires a reading or two to really appreciate it. Just his description on how to avoid spoke wind-up improved my wheelbuilding a great deal.

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Old 05-04-08, 12:34 PM   #20
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I've done more wheels on my flipped fork stand than anything else... besides the high tech zip ties I also have a dial indicator that I can use to really make those microscopic adjustments.
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Old 05-04-08, 08:08 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milnerpt View Post
I have the Spindoctor stand and have questions for those who use it. I typically use it more just to try to straighten out my wheels, and still need a LOT of practice. Anyhow, does it matter that the front prongs (that come out to meet the sidewalls of the rims) function and move independantly of one another? I was thinking of trying to attach som sort of caliper that would move them in unison...

or is there another way that you go about assuring you are straightening the rim and not screwing up the dishing?
I used two pieces of masking tape on the flat metal piece that pivots up to measure the radial truing. (the thing with the ruler marks on it). Each tape lines up with the edges of the rim. Then when I flip it, I can compare it easily. I believe the arms that hold the axle stay centered, but I try to move them as little as possible when flipping it. It's not as good as a dish guage, but it worked.

When doing side to side truing, I check both sides with the prong things, one at a time, and pick the worst bump to reduce first, just using the probe on that side. I never use them both at the same time. Then do it again, and pick whatever is now the worst. Then use the ruler to check the radial truing. ( I try to get the radial truing fairly close before starting the side to side truing)

Since tires seem to have their own set of bulges, I don't try to get the radial truing as exact as the side to side truing, since side to side is what shows up as brake pulsing.

I'm just an amateur at this, so I'm always open to suggestions, too.

Last edited by rm -rf; 05-04-08 at 08:17 PM.
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Old 05-04-08, 08:19 PM   #22
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I've built about 5-6 wheels, and have 3 bikes worth to true. I have no finesse...
I've the cheaper version of Park, TS5? TS7? it came with a dish gauge, which is fine.
I second rm-rf's suggestion on the tensionometer, any truing stand will work well, a spin doctor is nice as it has the caliper for centering the wheel, but I've never used one, I like the idea of it.
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