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Old 05-13-08, 10:25 PM   #1
MrCjolsen
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Removing a very stuck seatpost and stem.

I'm about to embark on the Sheldon Brown / Jobst Brandt destructive stem and seatpost removal method. I have nothing to lose, I found the bike at the dump (though it is a Miyata 710 with very nice paint).

My plan is to drill/file/dremel/hacksaw or whatever the two parts out of the frame.

Question: What tools do I need and how to I go about it. Also, the seatpost is lowered as far as it will go. So there's nothing really left to cut off.
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Old 05-14-08, 06:30 AM   #2
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I think if I were to do this job, I'd start by using liquid wrench or WD40 and over a few days keep applying it and then try pulling it out.
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Old 05-14-08, 06:38 AM   #3
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Also try alternating heat and cold. The relative movement will help break the bond. Alternating a heat gun with dry ice (Ice cream shops) has worked for me, particularly if the frame is aluminum.
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Old 05-14-08, 06:55 AM   #4
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for the stem, turn the frame upside down, and pour some liquid wrench or wd40 down the steer tube, and let it sit for a few days. Keep adding some. You might have to cut the stem off at the bend, having the fork out of the frame makes it easier to work with. Then again, you will need a new stem.
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Old 05-14-08, 07:19 AM   #5
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sheldon brown has a good article on this but ive personally tried everything,, many times over. best method that works for me after ive exhausted all other options is to soak the bugger in penetrating oil,, drill a hole through the center of post,, run a steel rod of somekind through the hole and use two hands to twist it out,, maybe even a cheater bar.. obviously less riskey with a steel post but it can be done on an aluminum one aswell,, you just have to do it carefully as to not destroy it.. this is all assuming youve already tried clamping a seat on and twisting it.
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Old 05-14-08, 09:02 AM   #6
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I have had much better luck with PB Blaster than with Liquid Wrench.
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Old 05-14-08, 09:26 AM   #7
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drill a hole through the center of post,, run a steel rod of somekind through the hole and use two hands to twist it out,, maybe even a cheater bar.. obviously less riskey with a steel post but it can be done on an aluminum one aswell,, you just have to do it carefully as to not destroy it.. this is all assuming youve already tried clamping a seat on and twisting it.
A good method for many cases, but for seatposts only. Stems are a little trickier as one will bend the blades of a fork (steel fork, that is) if any leverage is put against them.

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Old 05-14-08, 12:40 PM   #8
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I don't care about the stem or seatpost. I just want the frame. If I need to destroy the stem and seatpost that's fine.

I tried soaking it in ammonia. I think the aluminum alloy has expanded to make it a solid press fit that is unremovable.
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Old 05-14-08, 02:17 PM   #9
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I have had much better luck with PB Blaster than with Liquid Wrench.
Once I discovered PB Blaster, I never ever went back to the others. Just excellent stuff.
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Old 05-14-08, 02:27 PM   #10
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This is my 2nd week into the process of removing a stuck stem. Things I've tried:

WD40 (didn't work)
Force (didn't work)
Vinegar (didn't work)
Ammonia (didn't work)
Drill (didn't have one big enough to drill through the whole stem, but would be the way to go)
Heat + Cold to break the bond (didn't work)
Lye solution (it's currently being slowly dissolved out)

I wouldn't use too much force as you may damage the fork.
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Old 05-14-08, 05:51 PM   #11
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Once I discovered PB Blaster, I never ever went back to the others. Just excellent stuff.
I've heard Kroil is the best one. Has anybody used both the PB Blaster and Kroil and have an opinion on which is best?
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Old 05-14-08, 06:12 PM   #12
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I don't care about the stem or seatpost. I just want the frame. If I need to destroy the stem and seatpost that's fine.

I tried soaking it in ammonia. I think the aluminum alloy has expanded to make it a solid press fit that is unremovable.

heres the deal. once you destroy the stem or seatpost you limit your options of getting it out. if the seatpost crumples it will just tear appart when you twist it. at that point youd have to take a hacksaw to it and employ the sheldon brown meathod which is not fun.

for the stem id wrap the fork crown two times in a towl, clamp the fork in a vice and be sure to clamp it at the crown to avoid twisting the fork blades. the stem should be facking up. oil the stem,, place a long cheater bar through the stem where the handlebars would normally go and spin the stem around till it comes free.
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Old 05-14-08, 08:10 PM   #13
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I've heard Kroil is the best one. Has anybody used both the PB Blaster and Kroil and have an opinion on which is best?
I have on both, and I stick by PB Blaster now. YMMV and all that, but I think it's the best, restoring old cars and motorcycles and bicycles. Plus, PB Blaster works great as a lube for the mill and lathe in a pinch.
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Old 05-14-08, 08:24 PM   #14
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The trick to avoid this sticky situation is applying grease on the seatpost and wiping it off so that it only leaves a slight lubrication. That way, won't slip nor stick.
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Old 05-14-08, 08:44 PM   #15
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The trick to avoid this sticky situation is applying grease on the seatpost and wiping it off so that it only leaves a slight lubrication. That way, won't slip nor stick.
Yeah, that's helpful.
However the OP found the bike at the dump, so this tip maybe is a bit too late and given to the wrong person...
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Old 05-14-08, 09:05 PM   #16
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I just got a very stuck seatpost loose. I took off the crank and bb. I was then able to apply liquid wrench from the top and bottom and alternate letting it penetrate and then applying some torque until it finally broke loose -- although I was still not able to extract it. I took it to the lbs and they have a jig on one of their stands that has a small arm that clamps directly through the bottom bracket - then you're pulling directly on the post away from the point where the frame is clamped. With the frame braced firmly and an old crappy saddle clamped in place to act as a lever, we were able to twist the seatpost out gradually - a few millimeters at a time at first - then in bigger chunks - resting for a few minutes in between tries and applying liquid wrench as we went along.
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Old 05-14-08, 09:13 PM   #17
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Yeah, that's helpful.
However the OP found the bike at the dump, so this tip maybe is a bit too late and given to the wrong person...
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