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Old 12-17-03, 09:53 AM   #1
Corsaire
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Changing the Handle Bar "yosef" ?

I want to swap my stock drop handle bar which came with my Vigorelli for an Easton EC90 Carbon one.
Is this easy to do OR should I better leave it for the bike shop?

I understand I'd have to remove the brakes levers, bar tape, etc. and I never done this before.

Please help!
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Old 12-17-03, 09:59 AM   #2
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It isn't a difficult process, but you should save the stock bar so that when the CF reaches the end of its short lifespan, you have something to replace it with.

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Old 12-17-03, 10:03 AM   #3
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What do you mean, the Carbon drop handle bar won't last 'et all'?
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Old 12-17-03, 10:46 AM   #4
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All handlebars have a fairly short lifespan due to the stress placed upon them by soaking up bumps while you are leaning on them. They tend to fail right at the stem. CF bars tend to have a shorter lifespan than aluminum, which has a shorter lifespan than steel. Generally, after 2 years of hard use, you are on borrowed time.

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Old 12-17-03, 10:53 AM   #5
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Then it should be alright 'cause I'm not a racer and it'll be mainly for some commuting and long fitness rides.

Still I'm left with the installation thing......???

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Old 12-17-03, 11:29 AM   #6
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Then why change it at all??? If vibration is an issue, try Specialized Phat Wrap. The tape comes with these gel things that stick to the bar on the tops and the drops, then tape over them. Along with a good pair of gloves, you will be comfy and your wallet will be fatter too.

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Old 12-17-03, 11:32 AM   #7
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the again why not? I already got the EC90 Carbon, got it at Ebay from the same dealer I got the Vigorelli:
Vigorelli for the price of the EROS: $ 1,099
and the carbon bar for $ 108
both brand new, a steal really
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Old 12-17-03, 05:32 PM   #8
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Start by removing the tape from the old bars. It is possible to save it, but you're better off buying a couple of new rolls. Don't forget to untape the cables too. Then remove the levers. There's a little groove on the inside of Shimano levers, lift the rubber hood and push an allen key in there (5mm I think). Just loosen it enough to slide it off the end. I'm not sure how to get Campys off. Then remove the bars from the stem.

To put the new ones on, simply do all the above in reverse (mounts bars on stem, mount levers on bars, tape bars). You'll need to mess about with the positioning of the levers and the angle of the bars (unless you were clever and measured the old ones). Once you're happy, tape the cables to the bars with electrical tape. Leave the lever bolts loose enough for fine adjustments later. then the fun bit: bar tape. The instructions with my last roll were pretty good, but I'll give you a few basic pointers anyway. This is for the left bar, reverse for the right. You'll need to fold the rubber hood up to get it out of the way, then cut a short piece of tape (about 4 inches should do) to cover the clamp. Start at the end of the drops, with the end of the tape on top, pointing right (the roll should be in your left hand, to the left of the bars). Wrap a bit more than once round, going counter-clockwise, hanging over the end by half the tape's width. Then start working your way up, overlapping by about a third of the tape's width. Getting it right around the levers and bends can be tricky, but don't worry if it's not perfect. Eventually you'll get to the bulge in the centre of the bars, at which point you should stop. You'll want to cut the end at an angle, so it sits square to the bar, with the end on the bottom (hopefully it will be pointing backwards, but no biggie if it isn't). Finally, wrap some electrical tape round a few times to secure the tape, and having checked their position, tighten the levers (it's amazing how different they feel without tape, so you may want to move them slightly).

Hope that helped.
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Old 12-17-03, 05:51 PM   #9
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Corsaire, broken bars are much more rare than someone would lead you to believe.
Do they break? Sure, everything does eventualy.

Easton makes a stem thats designed to minimize the stresses on a bar where it clamps. There are pictures simulating the stresses of various stem designs somewhere.....on their website maybe?

Follow Johnny B's instructions and it should go OK.....

By the way...I dont race and one of those bars is going on my bike...why? Because I think they're pretty cool and I want a 'tricked out' bike.

In the 12 years I worked as mechanic I only saw a handfull of broken bars....ride....enjoy...
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Old 12-18-03, 07:44 AM   #10
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Thanks a lot guys for your responeses.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS, EVERYBODY!

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Old 12-18-03, 03:39 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corsaire
Thanks a lot guys for your responeses.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS, EVERYBODY!

Corsaire

Wrapping the bars takes some practice. I'd congratulate you if you got it right the very first time. Be sure to pay attention to how the tape is wrapped while you are removing it. I agree with Jonny B's instructions and would like to add that you sometimes have to stretch the cork tape a little bit to wrap the whole bar. Different brands are slightly different lengths.

Some helpful illustrations are here:

http://www.jimlangley.net/wrench/tapebars.htm

Peace,
B
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Old 12-18-03, 05:22 PM   #12
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a nifty trick that i learned for wrappig bars is to take some electrical tape and wrap it once around the ends of the bars, then flip it sticky side up and wrap it up about 2 or 3 inches, then flip it back around (sticky side down) and cut it.

it helps keep the real handlbar tape from slipping while you're putting it on, and it also can help prevent the tape from unravelling if you do a lot of sprints from the drops.

i learned it at a USACycling mechaninc's clinic.
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Old 12-19-03, 08:10 AM   #13
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I decided to take it to the LBS to do it. Now instead of the stock handle drop bar/black cork tape I got:
EC 90 CArbon bar and Celeste cork tape.
Wow! the celeste cork tape makes the Vigorelli looks prettier (frame color is Titanium/Celeste matte), in my eyes anyway.
Not to talk about the feel of the bike when steering it and going over bumps, that combo (Carbon bar and fork)
makes for a totally different ride folks. I don't know how to describe it properly but almost like having shocks on the front side of the frame, awesome!
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