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  1. #1
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    drivetrain life???

    how long should the chain, sprockets, chainrings last on a mountainbike??? mine is completely destroyed after 3000 miles, mostly concrete riding, the bike shops pretty much told me that it was just wear and tear. i used dumonde tech lube. the teeth are completely rubbed down

  2. #2
    Senior Member Avalanche325's Avatar
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    Not trying to be a smart a$$ here. But, if you kept the same chain for 3000 miles, that is why everything else is worn out. A worn chain will accelerate the wear on the cogs and chainrings.

    I find that I go through 2 - 3 chains per cogset. Chainrings seem to last me a very long time. The little one goes if you do a lot of climbing.

  3. #3
    ld-cyclist prestonjb's Avatar
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    Not to get into a battle of when to replace them but the manufacture lifetime on a cassette is 6000-8000 miles.

    A chain is like 1500-3000 depending on use... Dirty mountain bike chains are more like 1000-1500 miles...

    I agree that you should get 2-3 chain changes per cog-set.

  4. #4
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    You can reduce the rate of cog and chainring wear by replacing your chain as soon as it has elongated by 0.5 percent (i.e., 1/16" per 24 half-links) and by avoiding the small-to-small gear combinations. Depending on the rider, 1.5-2K mi / 2-3K km per chain sounds about right.

  5. #5
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    Help me out here guys, you all say that 2000 miles to 3000 miles on a chain is the limit yet my chains last an average of 13,000 miles and my cogs last 75,000! Here is my question, I use the older freewheel friction shifting stuff (7 cogs), did the older systems last longer? Unfortunatly this is New Years eve and I cannot contact my bike shop till Friday to ask this question.

  6. #6
    ld-cyclist prestonjb's Avatar
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    Nope. Again I stated that I am quoting manufacture replacement numbers and I didn't want to get into a battle of "my drivetrain outlasts yours because I know when to replace stuff".

    Actually I suspect that your drivetrain is past worn and your chains are stretching to fit (which will happen)...

    Also note that riding style and area you live in also has something to do with it.

    My racing bike I want to make sure is always ready so I tend to replace stuff closer to when it is "suggested" to prevent being out on a day that I want to hammer hard and don't want it to skip on me.

    My comutter bike gets stuff replaced when it falls off... Well OK I change it a bit sooner than that but theres times when I ride home stuck in a certain gear because a cable froze or broke. That reminds me I'd better replace that rear tire before it pops on its own

    If you do fairly casual speed riding (20mph or less) then your bike will likely last longer (given the weather conditions and stuff noted above). Here in South Florida sunlight and sever downpours are our worst problem. My comutter tends to rott cable housings and tires tend to rot off (esp on the side that tends to face the sun all day). Heck my wife's bike has changed from red to pink over the last three years! And only on one side!

    Steel bikes tend to only last like 5 years if you keep them in the garage here. I converted my garage to be airconditioned and I keep my steel bikes inside ALWAYS.

    A friend with a POS 7-speed thinks he gets lots of miles without changing stuff but after watching him, he is getting like 8000 miles before he starts to get chain-skip. Usually he just ignores it, as he is, but eventually he tries to keep up and ride fast a time or two and the skip eventually bites back enought that he realizes the bike is really in need of a change. Ride light and it can go a long way... Ride tough and it will wear out faster.

  7. #7
    Just ride. roadbuzz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by froze
    Help me out here guys, you all say that 2000 miles to 3000 miles on a chain is the limit yet my chains last an average of 13,000 miles and my cogs last 75,000! Here is my question, I use the older freewheel friction shifting stuff (7 cogs), did the older systems last longer? Unfortunatly this is New Years eve and I cannot contact my bike shop till Friday to ask this question.
    I'm assuming the mtn. bike question has drifted into the realm of road biking... so I'm jumping in!

    Can't authoritatively answer your question, but would guess the answer is yes, sort of. I think there is more tolerance on 7 speed systems, especially with friction since your shifting is not constrained by "clicks." Seems like the rule of thumb in the days of 6 and 7 speed cassettes, even with indexed, was 1/8" per foot chain stretch. With 9 and 10 speed cassettes, 1/16" seems to be the limit.

  8. #8
    ld-cyclist prestonjb's Avatar
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    Yea we've mixed road and mountain numbers here.

    I'm confused by your comment about chain stretch. What you are describing is how fast something shifts...

    However even if I live with hesitation it will still shift on modern drive trains.

    But to me a "bad" chain or "bad" cassette is not one that hesitates but one that spins. This is the case no matter what gears you use.

    Having said that there is an additional comment to add... Shimano shortened the height of the teeth on the HG over the non or pre-HG gears. This shorter tooth could cause a chain to "spin" sooner than the taller pre-HG gear. Reason... The chain has to crawl higher to get above the teeth to spin or slip on the old systems than the HG systems.

    Then again my old DuoSport tandem with non-HG gears spun a chain after we did 3/4 of a season which ended with 10 days in the appalachain mountains (an a climb of Mt Mitchell)... I replaced the chains after the trip and spin-spin-spin and that was old suntour/sram stuff. Replaced the "freewheel" and all was happy again.

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