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Old 06-18-08, 06:19 PM   #1
daoswald
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Converting a quill-stem hybrid to threadless.

My Cannondale H400 came with a quill stem that had adjustable stem angle/rise. There was a pivot at what we used to call the gooseneck. At that pivot there was a screw on either side, and one beneath; loosen the three and you can adjust the angle of the stem. But I wasn't thrilled with the configuration. In particular, it became a problem when the pivot developed a fair amount of play by the time I hit 2500 miles on the bike.

I found what I think is a nice solution. I put a quill to threadless stem adapter in the steering tube, and attached a standard threadless stem to it. In the process I moved things down a couple of centimeters, but that was one of the goals anyway. The threadless stem I used was a 17 degree rise stem, which still puts the bars lower than I was using with the adjustable rise stem. But having gotten used to my road bike, I'm happy to have a little more drop.

The total cost was under $50 for an inexpensive stem and an inexpensive adapter. The old hybrid has new life.
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Old 06-18-08, 06:38 PM   #2
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So what's the question again?
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Old 06-18-08, 06:45 PM   #3
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I appreciate the solution

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Originally Posted by operator View Post
So what's the question again?
I didn't know a quill to threadless adapter existed, so I appreciate your thread. I'm rocking a Takara Olympian and it's a bit small for me. I might try this as a solution. Thanks!
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Old 06-18-08, 06:47 PM   #4
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Would this have any advantage over using a standard nonadjustable quill stem with a similar amount of rise...?
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Old 06-18-08, 06:48 PM   #5
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I didn't know a quill to threadless adapter existed, so I appreciate your thread. I'm rocking a Takara Olympian and it's a bit small for me. I might try this as a solution. Thanks!
I fail to see what problem this solves to begin with. Regular quill stems can do the exact same thing. The op just never bothered to buy one and instead complicated it by getting the adapter + threadless stem.

Please tell me if i'm missing something obvious.
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Old 06-18-08, 06:49 PM   #6
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Would this have any advantage over using a standard nonadjustable quill stem with a similar amount of rise...?
I guess the only advantage would be the huge variety and availablitly of threadless stems vs the low amount of quills that would match every combo you could make with threadless.
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Old 06-18-08, 07:21 PM   #7
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I guess the only advantage would be the huge variety and availablitly of threadless stems vs the low amount of quills that would match every combo you could make with threadless.
Right. That's it: variety and availability.
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Old 06-18-08, 07:38 PM   #8
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You're talking about this?

http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...%20ATB%20Stems
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Old 06-19-08, 12:35 AM   #9
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Yes, that's the adapter.

The advantage to this setup is similar to the advantage that moved the market in this direction in the first place; greater flexibility of stem selection for length, angle, and orientation (ie, flipped).

Also, as long as I'm forced to replace the quill/stem combo that came with the bike (as its adjustable stem angle riser wore out and developed play), it seemed like a good time to switch to a more modern setup.
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Old 06-19-08, 01:10 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by operator View Post
I guess the only advantage would be the huge variety and availablitly of threadless stems vs the low amount of quills that would match every combo you could make with threadless.
Don't forget the difference in clamp design, threadless stems allows you to unbolt the front plate to remove the handlebar intact, where quill stems usually require (one set of) levers and grips to be removed before the bar can be slipped out.
I've read about a quill-type stem with removable front plate but never seen one myself.
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Old 06-19-08, 03:38 AM   #11
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Don't forget the difference in clamp design, threadless stems allows you to unbolt the front plate to remove the handlebar intact, where quill stems usually require (one set of) levers and grips to be removed before the bar can be slipped out.
I've read about a quill-type stem with removable front plate but never seen one myself.

I think that this is a big advantage. But then again I'm old enough to remember that some old Quill stems offered this as well before it fell out of fashion.
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Old 06-19-08, 04:23 AM   #12
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The 2001 Fuji Touring I have came equipped with a faceplated 1" quill stem. It was transferred to my fixed-gear build, which left me in a quandary about the touring bike. I used the quill-to-threadless adapter, simply because I could not locate a stylish quill stem that was 0 deg as on the Fuji. I picked up five generic threadless stems on eBay of different lengths for around $10 including postage, and they have allowed me to fiddle with my comfort zone.

The system is relatively light, opens up more options, and works for me.
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Old 06-19-08, 03:57 PM   #13
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I thought everyone switched to threadless because the bearings are easier to adjust...Do everything with a 5mm allen wrench, rather than dealing with headset locknut wrenches... That, and it's easier to stock one length threadless steerers, rather than multiple threaded...
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Old 06-19-08, 04:04 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dabac View Post
Don't forget the difference in clamp design, threadless stems allows you to unbolt the front plate to remove the handlebar intact, where quill stems usually require (one set of) levers and grips to be removed before the bar can be slipped out.
I've read about a quill-type stem with removable front plate but never seen one myself.


Profile Designs makes a whole variety of them for road and MTBs.
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Old 06-19-08, 04:12 PM   #15
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I guess the only advantage would be the huge variety and availablitly of threadless stems vs the low amount of quills that would match every combo you could make with threadless.
The variety of threadless stems isn't as useful as it seems in terms of fitting, especially if you are trying to achieve relatively high rise. Threadless steerer tubes can only extend a limited distance above the headset, and the selection of threadless stems with angles beyond 17 degrees is verylimited - in fact the only ones I know of are the Specialized variable rise stems and some heavy, clunky adjustable stems.
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Old 06-19-08, 05:07 PM   #16
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You don't have a more "modern" setup. You have a kludgy adaptation. The sensible thing to do would have been to just use a quill stem. There's no advantage whatsoever to having an aheadset type stem that's mounted on a quill anyway.
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Old 06-19-08, 05:11 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by operator View Post
I fail to see what problem this solves to begin with. Regular quill stems can do the exact same thing. The op just never bothered to buy one and instead complicated it by getting the adapter + threadless stem.

Please tell me if i'm missing something obvious.

You missing a lot. One has a much larger selection of legths and angles with threadless stems, especially when looking at steerers that are 1 1/8".

That said, nothing is more beautiful than a nicely extended Nitto Technomic stem.

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You don't have a more "modern" setup. You have a kludgy adaptation. The sensible thing to do would have been to just use a quill stem. There's no advantage whatsoever to having an aheadset type stem that's mounted on a quill anyway.
Nothing kludgy about it. Its simply an effective way to utilize threadless stems.

Please point to the selection of quill stems. Particularly the ones for 1 1/8" steerers.

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Would this have any advantage over using a standard nonadjustable quill stem with a similar amount of rise...?
I never felt comfortable with an exposed quill stem on a mountain bike
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Old 06-19-08, 05:47 PM   #18
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The advantage to this setup is similar to the advantage that moved the market in this direction in the first place; greater flexibility of stem selection for length, angle, and orientation (ie, flipped).
I think cause and effect are getting a bit confused here. All but one of those advantages (orientation) can be duplicated with a quill stem. Those advantages are effects of some other cause for threadless stems' popularity, which are independent of the length and angle of the stem.

It's more reasonable that the cause has to do with how it attaches to the steerer tube (for example, as kramnnim mentioned, the ease of preloading the bearings).
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