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Old 06-22-08, 01:54 PM   #1
Nihilistic
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Broke a spoke on my '07 Giant OCR3

I want to try replacing the broken spoke myself, since this is the third time I've had to deal with this issue. Although the other two times were on a different bike. I had two broken spokes on the rear wheel of my Schwin Mesa mountain bike, and my LBS charged me $15 to replace the spokes and true the rim, and perhaps put new rim tape on.

My daily ride involves an unavoidable railroad tracks crossing (I suppose I could get off and carry the bike over the tracks), and a couple of significant bumps along the way that span the entire width of the road, and I'm still weighing in the clydesdale class, so replacing spokes is something I'll likely have to do again.

The broken spoke is on the drive side of the rear wheel on my Giant OCR3. The rim is an Alex DA22. I've measured the broken spoke with a caliper for guage and tape measure for length. The guage is 1.8 mm, and the length is 292 mm. Do you measure from the tip of the threaded end to the outer edge of the elbow end in a straight line? Or should you include the length of the elbow that attatches to the hub flange as part of the total length to determine the correct spoke length to buy? I was considering the 1.8mm x 292mm Wheelsmith spokes, that can be had for about $18 for a bag of 50 from ebikestop.com. Are these decent spokes? What's a butted versus non-butted or straight guage spoke?

I realize I'll need to buy the Park FRG-5GC center lockring removal tool, a chain whip, a spoke wrench, rim tape, and possibly a wheel truing stand. But, I'll probably save money and lost riding days waiting on my LBS to fix my wheel in the long run.
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Old 06-22-08, 02:41 PM   #2
dabac
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nihilistic View Post
Do you measure from the tip of the threaded end to the outer edge of the elbow end in a straight line?
Inside face of elbow to threaded tip.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nihilistic View Post
I was considering the 1.8mm x 292mm Wheelsmith spokes, that can be had for about $18 for a bag of 50 from ebikestop.com. Are these decent spokes? .
Yes, they're good. But so are DTs and Sapim.

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Originally Posted by Nihilistic View Post
What's a butted versus non-butted or straight guage spoke?
Non-butted and straight gauge are different names for a spoke with even thickness all over apart from the head.

Butted means that the spoke is thinner along the middle than at the elbow and the thread.

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Originally Posted by Nihilistic View Post
I realize I'll need to buy the Park FRG-5GC center lockring removal tool, a chain whip, a spoke wrench, rim tape, and possibly a wheel truing stand.
Yes, yes, yes, no, no.
You only need to remove the rim tape if the nipple is messed up, which is far less common than broken spokes.
Wheel trueing stands are nice, but for the occasional popped spoke trueing with the bike flipped over should be quite sufficient.
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Old 06-23-08, 05:18 PM   #3
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I dropped by my LBS this morning, and picked up a new spoke. He measured my old one, at 289 mm and 14 guage (2.0 mm diameter). The closest he had in stock was Wheelsmith SS14 288 mm. Close enough! I bought the Park FRG-5GC center lockring removal tool and rim tape from them, a Giant multi-spoke wrench, as well as the new spoke. They had just sold the last chain whip they had in stock, so they let me use theirs to unlock the lockring while I was there at the shop. Very nice of them The chain whip isn't needed to tighten it when putting it back together, so I'll pick up one of those next time.

I installed the new spoke, installed the rim tape (that I never should have taken off in the first place, as dabac pointed out), mounted the tube and tire, and put the wheel back on (before inflating the tire, because it's easier to get past the break pads that way). I then trued the wheel while my bike was still in my Park PCS-9 workstand (love that thing...makes derailuer adjustments and just about everything else soooo much easier) using the brake pads as a caliper. Tightened up the new spoke, and found a couple other loose ones using the "tune the piano" method of judging spoke tension. Spun the wheel and tightened and loosened the appropriate spokes until all the wobble was gone

Just took a ride tonight, and everything is good

I just wanna give a shout out to Cycles Plus in Danville, IL for being nice enough to let me use their chain whip. They're good people Also, I noticed a couple of Trek 1000's on sale for Father's Day marked down to $575! One is a 56 cm., and the other is a 60 cm. Helluva deal folks!
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