Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    2,140
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Broke a spoke-Now what?

    I was riding my fixed gear, as my road bike is waiting new tires. Hit a bump, my chain somehow get thrown into my rear wheel, took out a spoke, wrapped around and threw me to a halt. Somehow I stayed upright and didn't hit anyone. So I want to replace the spoke, retension and true the wheel, but I've never done this before. I just need one spoke, but how do I determine the length? Then once I have the spoke, I am going to need a spoke wrench, a truing stand and patience, correct?
    I'm sort of mechanically ********, so hopefully I can get it done!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    7,819
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I just need one spoke, but how do I determine the length? <-- if you have the broken one around just take it to the lbs and they will help you to figure it out. Option 2, take a good spoke out obviously at the same side of the wheels than the broken one and take it to the lbs.

    Then once I have the spoke, I am going to need a spoke wrench, a truing stand and patience, correct? <-- correct!!!

    True a Wheel isnt that hard, it makes a lot of sence how the process works, go to the web and read about it.

    The next option is to pay 40 bucks to get the wheel fixed in your lbs, for sure for 100 or less u can get a new one also

  3. #3
    Senior Member BCRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    The 'Wack, BC, Canada
    My Bikes
    Norco (2), Miyata, Canondale, Soma, Redline
    Posts
    5,432
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For only one spoke you don't need a truing stand or even a lot of patience. To figure out the length pull out the pieces of the busted one for starters. Obviously you need to pull off the tire and rim for this. Measure one of the other spokes from the head to the end of the nipple Or if you can accurately sight across make a best guess at the overall length from the head to the end of the threads..... or just take your wheel with the missing spoke in and the guys at the shop will compare spokes and give you the one you need.

    Thread it in matching the original crossings. This may mean you need to bend it to get it to fit. Just curve it as needed and avoid any kinking. Screw on the nipple and tighten it down to bring it up to tension. Tap the new spoke and those over at the other side of the wheel and compare the tone you get. When the spoke is coming up near to tension put the wheel back in your bike and flip it upside down. Use your brake shoe as a truness indicator. Or if you're running brakeless use a clothespin or something else taped to the frame to act as an indicator. Tighten the spoke to lever the rim over to the side so the rim is running as true as you can see with your eye. Keeping the indicator close to the rim helps for this. If the indicator is on the same side of the wheel as your new spoke then tightening the nipple will move the sidewall towards the indicator or brake pad. Loosening it will let the rim move away.

    That's all you need for this simple a job. Get to it.
    Model airplanes are cool too!.....

  4. #4
    Senior Member bktourer1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Western Ma.
    My Bikes
    Diamondback "parkway" Spec. "expedition
    Posts
    759
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    While your at the shop, get a couple of spares and tape to your frame. Or get a fiberfix for emergencies. Have the LBS remove that stupid plastic ring from the cassette side to make it easier to fix a broken spoke on that side

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •