Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-09-08, 08:32 PM   #1
ShadowGray
I like my car
Thread Starter
 
ShadowGray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Bikes:
Posts: 1,747
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
How to remove chain?

I want to take off the chain for cleaning and other maintenance but I can't seem to find out how to do it. Sheldon's site seems to say something about popping out the rivet but I can't find a detailed guide on how to do it. Is there a guide out there? Or is it just some kind of tool that I need?
ShadowGray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-08, 08:41 PM   #2
BikingGrad80
that bike nut
 
BikingGrad80's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Chicago north
Bikes: 2010 Motobecane Immortal Force 90' Trek 1400; 90' Trek 850; 06' Trek 520; 01 Iron Horse Victory
Posts: 933
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
You need a chain tool. it has 2 teeth that fit in the link and a pin that screws in and pops the rivet out. To reconnect you will need either a replacement link for shimano chains or a quick link for SRAM and some KMC chains. Check to see if you already have one.
BikingGrad80 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-08, 09:03 PM   #3
BCRider
Senior Member
 
BCRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: The 'Wack, BC, Canada
Bikes: Norco (2), Miyata, Canondale, Soma, Redline
Posts: 5,456
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just a note that it's not recomended to be popping the rivets in and out for something as common as cleaning the chain.

There's some chain cleaning gizmos that have three wheel brushes in them and you fill them to the indicated line with solvent or degreaser and then backpedal the chain through the cleaner. If it's real grungy you pour out the crud refill and repeat until the chain is nice and clean.

You don't even need to remove the chain or rear wheel to do this unless it's a BMX or single speed. If it is you just slacken it off and unmount the chain at the rear to provide enough slack.

Here's an example of roughly what they look like depending on brand. The top and middle wheel comes off for filling and closing around the chain on all of them and the chain U bends through the cleaner when you backpedal to run the chain through the cleaner.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg cleaner.jpg (8.4 KB, 12 views)
BCRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-08, 09:05 PM   #4
ShadowGray
I like my car
Thread Starter
 
ShadowGray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Bikes:
Posts: 1,747
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Oh well, I've seen recommendations to remove the chain and let it soak. What about those people who do that often?

Is removing a rivet usually irreversible for most chains now? Or can you reattach it?
ShadowGray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-08, 09:09 PM   #5
BCRider
Senior Member
 
BCRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: The 'Wack, BC, Canada
Bikes: Norco (2), Miyata, Canondale, Soma, Redline
Posts: 5,456
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It's not a great idea. And if you use a Shimano rivet it's like a buck each time.

If you were to switch to something like a SRAM chain with the master link it's easy to unsnap it and remove the chain.

But with the chain cleaning tool it'll get the chain just as clean if not cleaner than soaking it. If it soaks it's sitting in its own crud in the bottom of the cleaning solvent or degreaser. At least with the gizmo you pour the crud OUT and refill it.

Removing a rivet and replacing it will bruise the side plates so that it's not going to be quite as secure as it was originally. If you're not a strong rider then it's not as big a deal. But if you are someone that pushes their equipment hard then it is not a good practice to break a chain open for something as minor as cleaning. Especially when there's excellent products for doing the cleaning.
BCRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-08, 09:14 PM   #6
jsmithepa
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 1,152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
IMO, cleaning a chain is very, VERY messy. If u have a MTB or ride in dirt during rain, OK, gotta do it, but just your street road bike... personally I wouldn't bother and just replace chain ($12 bux?) every season or so.

I bought one of those cleaning thingy (as pictured above) when I was a noob and used it maybe twice.
jsmithepa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-08, 09:18 PM   #7
ShadowGray
I like my car
Thread Starter
 
ShadowGray's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Bikes:
Posts: 1,747
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Alright, that's all I need to know, I'll might invest in one of those gizmos.

On my old old beater bike though, the chain probably isn't in the best of conditions and I'd like to replace that. Which is where this topic might come in handy.
ShadowGray is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-08, 09:37 PM   #8
BCRider
Senior Member
 
BCRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: The 'Wack, BC, Canada
Bikes: Norco (2), Miyata, Canondale, Soma, Redline
Posts: 5,456
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'd suggest a KMC or cheaper SRAM even for the beater. Having the Power link has come in handy more than once for taking off the chain for doing some stuff. The SRAM comes with what they call a Powerlink and the KMC comes with a close equivalent. Both are a squeeze and push to loosen and click into place to lock for normal use. Well worth the extra 50 cents or buck these options cost over a noname rivet link chain IMHO.
BCRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-08, 09:37 PM   #9
operator
cab horn
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Toronto
Bikes: 1987 Bianchi Campione
Posts: 28,306
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The $20 Sram PC-48's have an infintely reusable quick-link. Time to invest in one.

If you like to take yoru chain off to clean it that is.
operator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-08, 10:51 PM   #10
MudPie
Senior Member
 
MudPie's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Southern California
Bikes:
Posts: 1,874
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by operator View Post
The $20 Sram PC-48's have an infintely reusable quick-link. Time to invest in one.

If you like to take yoru chain off to clean it that is.
+1. The SRAM chains with Powerlink are a well made and designed chain. Imagine uncoupling and coupling the chain in seconds with only your fingers, no tools necessary. I've been using SRAM chains for ~10 years, with no problems. It's one less excuse not to clean your chain.

To me, removing a rivet and replacing it is weaker than the original assembly. Plus, keeping extra Shimano pins on hand could be a PITA.

Also, you can buy the Powerlink masterlink itself and maybe use it on your existing chain. Someone with more experience can comment on compatibility with different brand chains.
MudPie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-09-08, 10:56 PM   #11
Bill Kapaun
Senior Member
 
Bill Kapaun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
Bikes: 86 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.
Posts: 9,274
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 49 Post(s)
I just use the $6 KMC Z51 chains (good up to 8 speed) from the local "outdoor" store. I have no qualms about pushing the pins in/out with my chain tool.
Bill Kapaun is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-08, 02:32 AM   #12
Vanthel
Will ask stupid questions
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Cambridge/London - UK
Bikes: Specialized Allez Elite 2007
Posts: 62
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
a SRAM powerlink is 100% compatible with shimano chains, just make sure they are the same speed
Vanthel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-08, 06:31 AM   #13
Mr. Underbridge
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Reston, VA
Bikes: 2003 Giant OCR2
Posts: 2,369
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsmithepa View Post
IMO, cleaning a chain is very, VERY messy. If u have a MTB or ride in dirt during rain, OK, gotta do it, but just your street road bike... personally I wouldn't bother and just replace chain ($12 bux?) every season or so.

I bought one of those cleaning thingy (as pictured above) when I was a noob and used it maybe twice.
Chain cleaning isn't messy if you do it very often and know what you're doing at all. With chain cleaning gizmo, the steps are 1) put cleaner in gizmo, 2) put gizmo under chain, 3)use two fingers to push chain down into gizmo, 4) Put cap onto gizmo, 5) pedal the cranks like crazy, 6) enjoy clean chain.

If you get crud on more than two fingers, you're doing it wrong. And if you use a dry lube, the chain doesn't get excessively nasty anyway.
Mr. Underbridge is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:50 PM.