Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 69
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Tire Tube Vulcanization patch kit

    Can anyone tell me where I can get a tire tube patch kit that comes with a clamp,and patches which are attached on the reverse of metal cups or small plates with a rim and they have a type of gunpowder or fire burning material powder and a patch on the other side of this metal cup which after you clamp it on a tube, then you set it aflame and it burns across the cup and it effects a repair to the tube with a very well sealed patch.I used to buy these at a waangsgaards grocery store/ace hardware and now they dont have these kits anymore.They called this type of kit a rubber vulcanizing patch kit.They do a far better patching of the tube than any other patch kit I have ever used anywhere else.After the patch is fired on you remove the clamp and you have a permanent repair of your bicycle tube.Where can I buy this kit?Does anyone else know where I can find this kit?I dont want to go back to messy glue patch kits that hardly work anyway.
    Please advise,
    Paul
    Mallagante@MSN.com
    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Neither rain, snow... dsm iv tr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    128
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'd be very interested to learn about this. I've never heard of such a contraption!
    "You have succeeded in life when all you really want is only what you really need."
    Vernon Howard

    BikeCode

  3. #3
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    DSM,
    I want to find these patch kits again as there just is nothing better in this world.A well kept secret obviously.Why is the question?
    Regards,
    Paul

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    799
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Haven't seen these for decades. I agree, they were the cat's pajamas. And fun to use, in a sorta childish, play-with-firecrackers sort of way.

    - Mark

  5. #5
    BikeForums Founder Joe Gardner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 1999
    Location
    Holladay, Utah.
    My Bikes
    Santa Cruz Superlight w/ Roholoff 500 & Bob IBEX
    Posts
    4,257
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Modern patch kits vulcanize with a chemical compound, no fire needed. Your patch kit sounds much funner, please do update us if you find some for sale, I'd love to see it in use!

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    799
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Gardner View Post
    Modern patch kits vulcanize with a chemical compound, no fire needed.
    I doubt there is any difference between the vulcanizing fluid in a "modern" patch kit vs. a patch kit of twenty years ago. The fluid and patch works Okay most of the time, but is sensitive to contamination and technique. With the old-style hot patches there was never any question - it was 100% reliable.

    - Mark

  7. #7
    53 miles per burrito urban_assault's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Ft Worth, TX
    My Bikes
    Land Shark, Trek 1000, Iron Horse Rogue
    Posts
    1,486
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mallagante View Post
    Can anyone tell me where I can get a tire tube patch kit that comes with a clamp,and patches which are attached on the reverse of metal cups or small plates with a rim and they have a type of gunpowder or fire burning material powder and a patch on the other side of this metal cup which after you clamp it on a tube, then you set it aflame and it burns across the cup and it effects a repair to the tube with a very well sealed patch.I used to buy these at a waangsgaards grocery store/ace hardware and now they dont have these kits anymore.They called this type of kit a rubber vulcanizing patch kit.They do a far better patching of the tube than any other patch kit I have ever used anywhere else.After the patch is fired on you remove the clamp and you have a permanent repair of your bicycle tube.Where can I buy this kit?Does anyone else know where I can find this kit?I dont want to go back to messy glue patch kits that hardly work anyway.
    Please advise,
    Paul

    Thank you.
    Sorry, I cannot help you find that type. I've never used one but I'll take your word that they work great.

    I'm just curious as to why you say the glue patches "hardly work anyway" ? It's been my
    experience that they work fine when applied correctly. Much to my dismay, I've applied a lot
    of glue patches over the years. Sure, once in a while a patch just does not want to act right but
    to say they hardly work is exaggerating.


  8. #8
    53 miles per burrito urban_assault's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Ft Worth, TX
    My Bikes
    Land Shark, Trek 1000, Iron Horse Rogue
    Posts
    1,486
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I do remember them as a kid in stores and once in use by a friend's dad. Were they taken off the market
    because one had to set it aflame to make it work? Did someone set fire to his home while trying to fix a flat tire?

    I'm not trolling, just curious now.


    Don't flame me.




    Sorry, could not resist.

  9. #9
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Dallas area, Texas
    Posts
    10,730
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I remember seeing my Dad use one of those when I was a kid (about 40 years ago). I just assumed that nobody made them for decades, now.

    When I was in high school and college (30 years ago), I did a lot of truck flat fixing, on tube-type tires. We used cold-applied patches similar to what is available for bikes now. One thing is that the patches seemed to be higher quality. I think part of the issue with modern patches is not the generic type of patch, but just low quality products in the first place, perhaps driven by the fact that people don't use tubes in car tires anymore.

    I'm not sure what all sizes those flaming patch kits were made it, but what I remember my dad using wouldn't have worked on anything but a balloon tire tube. Maybe they made smaller ones, too.

    Proper technique is important with the cold-applied patch kits. You have to let the glue dry before applying the patch. It helps to inflate the tube to about the size that it will be in the tire so that the patch doesn't have to stretch as much. When I was fixing truck flats, we'd always rub dust/dirt off the shop floor on the patch after it was applied so that the new glue around it didn't stick to the tire. Patches on the rim side of a tube are always iffy, in my experience.
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,292
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Gardner View Post
    Modern patch kits vulcanize with a chemical compound, no fire needed. Your patch kit sounds much funner, please do update us if you find some for sale, I'd love to see it in use!
    No. "cold vulcanizing fluid" is just glue. Automotive patches have a special compound on the surface that's glued to the tire. The heat of the tire flexing causes the patch to vulcanize in place. I doubt that bikes generate that sort of heat. (Tube-type truck and car tires can sometimes have the tube vulcanize to the inside of the tire through this heat. That's why you use talc when assembling such a tire.

    I've never seen the sort of repairs that the original poster is asking about. (I've heard of them, though.) I don't know if they're still made. I've my doubts. There are still heat curing tube patches available for the truck tire market. They'd work on a bike, but they're big and thick. You put them on with glue, like a normal patch, and then the tube is heated. A heat *** would be enough, heat, I should think.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    442
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    buy a rema tip-top patch kit and be done with it.

  12. #12
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I used to buy these at ace hardware and only about 2 months ago.Now I see they have been taken off the market.Why I dont know.They have to still be around somewhere.I just have to find some that are left.
    Thanks everyone,
    Paul

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    My Bikes
    Giant CRX
    Posts
    224
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I remember these from the early 60s. I reckon they disappeared because they'd be more expensive to manufacture -- not only the patch and pyrotechnic container but the holding frame too. Plus you've got to carry matches with you. They worked OK but glue patches are quick, easy, and $1.50 at the local $2 shop.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    A Latvian in Seattle
    Posts
    1,020
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    M - thanks for bringing back memories of patching bike tires with my Dad -- for a kid, the smelly burning patching process was so cool that I almost hoped for another flat!

  15. #15
    Senior Member filtersweep's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    2,615
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mallagante View Post
    I dont want to go back to messy glue patch kits that hardly work anyway.
    You must be doing it wrong--

  16. #16
    Year-round cyclist
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Montréal (Québec)
    Posts
    3,023
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The "messy glue patch kit" works fine with me! The only mess I do is when I move the chain off the rear wheel, not when I play with the glue. And I still have a few patches that are 5-6 years old.
    Michel Gagnon
    Montréal (Québec, Canada)

  17. #17
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    www.ci.encinitas.ca.us
    My Bikes
    1959 Capo; 1980 Peugeot PKN-10; 1981 Bianchi; 1988 Schwinn KOM-10;
    Posts
    15,267
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This is slightly off-topic, but what experiences, good, bad, or ugly, have folks had with glueless patches? The consensus at my local bike shop is that glueless are OK for mountain bike tubes, but Rema tip-top is still the way to go for road bikes, with their considerably higher pressures.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
    Peugeot: 1970 UO-8, S/N 0010468
    Bianchi: 1981 Campione d'Italia, S/N 1.M9914
    Schwinn: 1988 Project KOM-10, S/N F804069

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Sacramento, CA USA
    My Bikes
    not worth mentioning
    Posts
    187
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The consensus I hear from many techs is that the glueless is for temporary repairs ONLY b/c they only hold long enough you for to get home, then slow leak.
    -- Ron
    1. 2008 Giant FCR3 [hybrid; main bike]
    2. Schwinn World Sport 4130 [mixte road bike; red]
    3. year ?? Specialized RockHopper Comp (18-spd mtn bike; all Shimano Deore parts)

  19. #19
    Pwnerer Wordbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Pagosa Springs, CO, USA
    My Bikes
    Road, MTB, Cruiser, Chopper, BMX
    Posts
    2,900
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
    With the old-style hot patches there was never any question - it was 100% reliable.

    - Mark
    Sorry Mark, but I lived through that era...and they were anything but reliable.

    The gunpowder type heating element often had to be relit, and quickly, or the repair was uneven or leaked. Moisture no doubt had an ill effect on them.

    Great care had to be taken with the clamping mechanism as it was cheaply made and could slip, ruining the patch job.

    If the hole in the tube was too large, the patch would bond to the opposing inside surface of the tube, rendering it useless.

    I would guess that the death knell for this type of patch was that it took more time, skill, expense and luck, and in the end was no better than the up-and-comer glue patch kit which was cheap, compact, lightweight, fast and had a shorter learning curve.
    Quote Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
    Ski, bike and wish I was gay.

  20. #20
    Senior Member ken cummings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    northern California
    My Bikes
    Bruce Gordon BLT, Cannondale parts bike, Ecodyne recumbent trike, Counterpoint Opus 2, miyata 1000
    Posts
    5,605
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    40 years ago I read of using resistance heating pads to soften the seams in latex goods to allow their repair. Now even the Fetish shops like Versitile Fashions use liquid glues and pressure sensitive tapes.
    This space open

  21. #21
    Old Fogy
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Murray, Utah
    Posts
    1,224
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I still have a handful of those hot patches. The trade name is Match Patch. I quit using them years ago, as there is no need for them, that I can see. A properly applied glue-on patch is just as good as a hot patch. If the tube is not properly cleaned, a hot patch will not stick, any more than a glue-on will. These patches are 1 1/4" by 2", and a road bike tube is just over 3/4", so how would you apply a patch that is wider than the tube?

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    320
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've been putting off posting this, hoping to remember where I bought them a few years ago. Danged if I can recall...NAPA maybe? Pretty sure they were either Camel or Monkey Grip branded. I recall that I had not seen them in many years so I bought them when I saw them.

    I've only ever used them on tubeless tires. In that case you don't have the clamping action of the tube against the tire.

    I also have a couple of the special clamps that allow one to hold them in position before touching them off.

    One advantage is that they have a very long shelf life, unlike the glue.

  23. #23
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Hello Waldowales...

    I see you are from Murray.I live in Ogden.Would you consider selling your remaining fire patches then I could reload the metal cups with something comparable and still use my leftover clamp
    .Please advise,
    Paul
    Mallagante@MSN.com
    Please get in touch.Thank you.

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Gaseous Cloud around Uranus
    Posts
    3,483
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Those were the good patches when I was young,haven't seen them in a while.They still make a hot patch but it's for big truck/tractor type things.You light the glue and patch on fire to "cure" it.Go to a web site called Plews/Edelmann,look under tire repair.You can buy all the junk at any big box auto place.If they don't have it,they can get it.
    Everything should be as simple as possible...But not more so.---Albert Einstein

  25. #25
    Old Fogy
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Murray, Utah
    Posts
    1,224
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •