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Old 08-20-08, 09:58 AM   #1
Windsor2.0
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Please help me. Recieved new bike and chain was partially off.

Well I recieved my Windsor Wellington 2.0 bike yesaterday. And i got everything together. And then i realized that the chain was hooked on only on the back cogs, Not the front. It had been off and laying down by the pedal housing. So i took a chance and hooked it up to what i though would be the right cog. Yea, It clicks like a son of a gun when i pedal. So now i have got problems. I need to adjust this without a bike shop, I can do anything you tell me, I just need an explanation. Thanks guys.

Also, My bike has these little tiny like shifters next to my Brake levers, and the brake levers also shift. Whats are they?
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Old 08-20-08, 10:20 AM   #2
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http://www.parktool.com/repair/
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Old 08-20-08, 10:44 AM   #3
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Also, My bike has these little tiny like shifters next to my Brake levers, and the brake levers also shift. Whats are they?
Not to sound like an @$$ but if you just read the manuals that came with the bike everything is pretty self explanatory. Those little 'levers' are for shifting. They're for going Big --> Small front and rear. Counterintuitive on the front but if you think of it in terms of Big to Small it makes more sense. The brake levers are for shifting Small --> Big both front and rear. If it's the first time you've put a bike together then take your time. It'll all come together in the end.
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Old 08-20-08, 10:47 AM   #4
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Also, My bike has these little tiny like shifters next to my Brake levers, and the brake levers also shift. Whats are they?
Shimano Sora shifters. One lever shifts up, the other down.
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Old 08-20-08, 02:58 PM   #5
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Wind,
I don't know why you can't, or won't, use the services of a LBS, but you really need to reconsider. there is nothing wrong with buying a bike online, like from Bikes Direct, and then taking the bike to a professional shop to get it adjusted and dialed in. The LBS will simply charge a small fee and you will have a bike that's been tightened and adjusted and inspected for safe operation, and performing to its maximum potential.

If there is just no way you can get the bike to a shop then at least read the manuals, and check out Sheldon Brown's web site for the best how to advise there is.
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Old 08-20-08, 04:43 PM   #6
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If one has to read the manual to operate a bicycle......

Adjustment, yeah, that parktool site oughtta do the job.
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Old 08-20-08, 05:56 PM   #7
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I thought this was a joke.

I mean come on- "these little tiny like shifters next to my Brake levers"???

If this is not a joke, then Windsor, you have made a BIG mistake not buying from your LBS.
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Old 08-20-08, 09:20 PM   #8
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The environment here is not as nice as it was thought to be. Sorry for asking questions.
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Old 08-21-08, 01:34 AM   #9
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The environment here is not as nice as it was thought to be. Sorry for asking questions.
I guess it wasn't a joke. Sorry for my previous post.

When I got back into biking, I didn't know a lot about the new shifters so I went to an LBS and they walked me through it.

That was really all I was trying to say. No offense intended.
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Old 08-21-08, 04:35 AM   #10
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Those little 'levers' are for shifting. They're for going Big --> Small front and rear. Counterintuitive on the front but if you think of it in terms of Big to Small it makes more sense.
My first real bike had the SORA shifters with thumb and lever shifts. They seemed to be backwards to the higher grade double lever shifters. By backwards I mean the thumb shift on the rear caused down shifting and the thumb shift on the front caused up shifting. It was easy to do double shifts because no matter what you did for a double shift ... you used the same levers.
I have a newer bike now with the 105's. Now big lever = up shift on both shifters and small lever = down shift on both shifters. After using them a while, your hands seem to shift for you without even thinking about it. It just takes time to get used to a new bike.
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Old 08-21-08, 07:49 AM   #11
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Windsor,
it sounds like your bike needs a complete dialing in, then it will need some adjustments as the components begin to settle in. A basic repair book or two will help you immensely (sp?).

http://www.parktool.com/products/det...=19&item=BBB-2


Your bike appears to be a road bike per this bikesdirect webpic:

( http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...lt1000_500.jpg )

So as referenced in another thread you might also pick up a copy of Zinn's Roadbike Maint. book:
http://www.amazon.com/Zinn-Art-Road-...9325651&sr=1-1

Zinn's Cycling Primer looks like it might be another good book for you to start out with:
http://www.amazon.com/Zinns-Cycling-...ref=pd_sim_b_6

Then by using the search feature on the site here and searching for terms like derailer adjustment you will find links to threads where people have provided basic setup parameters, such as:

http://www.bikeforums.net/search.php?do=process

which led me to a bunch of threads such as the following one:
Front derailer adjustment

There are other books out there, check any local used book stores and thrift shops and rummage sales if you can't afford to get the new books.

The internet is a great resource, it can also appear cold and stone hearted, all you can do is deal with it and find a way to work with it. Don't take it personal, it's just a computer connected to a network where you can communicate with a bunch of people you don't know directly. Imagine if you walked into a local bar and said you just bought a car off the internet and the delivery people just dropped it off and the door won't open and the engine won't start. There are ways to present an inquiry to get better responses, if your questions come off as too new and totally unknowing then folks who might have an answer won't know where to begin. Sometimes you have to take the time to read and listen before you go wander off to pout in a corner. So, stick around, take some time to read and search and see what's been said before, even if you just open up various threads one at a time and read or skim through them you will begin to get acclimated to the cycling lingo and might actually learn about adjusting a derailer and what to do if your chain drops off the inside of the small chainring.

Do something, print out your initial questions and file them away in a drawer someplace. Then a year from now pull them out and re-read them and see how far you've come in your cycling knowledge and awareness. Hope you get the bike sorted out and working well, and hope this helps a little.
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Old 08-21-08, 03:15 PM   #12
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hi wellington, you are probably in over your head right now but if you read some more on the internet you'll figure it out without going to the store. the chain is making noise probably because its rubbing against the FD.

first figure out the names of the various parts of the bike so you can start understanding the adjustment manuals. second, read the adjustment sequence for the front and rear derailleurs at parktools website. you wont have to go thru the entire adjustment sequence, but it'll give you an idea of what the problem is.

there's a couple of things you need to check with the internet bike before you ride it. make sure the brakes work, not rubbing the rim while riding, not rubbing the tire while braking. make sure the wheels are trued. make sure the quick release for the wheels is snug. make sure shifting is smooth. adjust the up down front and back position of the seat.
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Old 08-22-08, 10:14 AM   #13
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I brought the bike to an LBS. They are doing a complete tuneup for $65. He says its going to take them about 5 days? I mean i know it will take time but that much? It didnt seem like there was many bikes in the shop. But the place seems very respectable. Heres there site.

Southbridgebicycle.com
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Old 08-22-08, 10:20 AM   #14
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I brought the bike to an LBS. They are doing a complete tuneup for $65. He says its going to take them about 5 days? I mean i know it will take time but that much? It didnt seem like there was many bikes in the shop. But the place seems very respectable. Heres there site.

Southbridgebicycle.com
I'd say 5 days is reasonable. Remember, people who purchased their bike at that shop are going to get preferred treatment (which I believe is fair) so you are going to be a lower priority. If you start shopping there and spending $$ on accessories, you may find yourself getting faster service in the future.
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Old 08-22-08, 11:38 PM   #15
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Remember that not only is this peak biking season, but school is starting soon -- the shop likely has their hands full, unlike in the middle of winter. Sounds like you should have a fully shipshape bike by the end of the week -- enjoy!
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Old 08-23-08, 02:47 AM   #16
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A lot of shops operate on an appointment basis--so there may not be many bikes actually sitting waiting for repair, but they have a full dance card for the next few days.

Some people don't mind leaving their bikes for a few days, so those you'll see actually taking up space, along with completed jobs waiting for pickup. It's okay to ask about this stuff until you're satisfied--you're the customer! Just be polite and reasonable and they should give you the information you need.
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Old 08-23-08, 03:24 AM   #17
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As said bike shops are real busy at the moment so a wait is expected. I had to book an appointment to get mine checked over. Don't worry about not knowing everything. My friend went round in the same gear for two days on his new bike, until i told what those levers were!
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Old 08-23-08, 04:02 AM   #18
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Hi Windsor,

Welcome to the Forum!

Sorry if you felt the tone of some replies was less than warm. I've found it an inexhaustible source of expert knowledge learnt through experience, interest and a spirit of camaraderie. At times some answers might be a little curt, but that would be the same if you walked into a room full of say, 150 people and asked a simple question. Some of the wit and irony is often amusing.

From your question I'd guess that your front derailleur (the part that moves the chain between the front chainwheels) needs adjusting. It was a good call to take the bike to your local shop for them to set it up.

The price seems reasonable as you shouldn't need any parts as your bike is brand new! However good you become at bike mechanics (and reading this Forum is a brilliant way to increase your knowledge, I've been fiddling with bikes and building them for 44 years on and off and every time I log on I learn something), you will always need your Local Bike Shop (LBS) for that odd replacement bolt, inner tube, cable end. Time spent building a good relationship with them when they are less busy is a sound investment. Many shops are staffed by enthusiasts happy to pass on technical ideas, riding tips, details of good rides in the area and so on. Mine actually phoned me to say they had seen a used frame I might be interested in and offered me their trade price if I wanted to buy it! You don't have to buy everything there, there are brilliant deals on the internet, but the LBS is worth supporting as well.

Anyhow, enjoy your bike once it's sorted and look forward to seeing you again on the Forum.
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