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  1. #1
    Senior Member spaceballs's Avatar
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    Taping drop bars with bar end shifters...

    Does anyone have any advice for doing this?

    I try, but the grip tape bunches up where the shift cable comes out. What do you do?

  2. #2
    Cornish Mafia rjh299's Avatar
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    Don't know myself, but try searching youtube for a video. There's a few vids on fitting/fixing bikes. Might take some searching though, and even then there might not be any. Sorry for little or no help!
    English Bullies!!!
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

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    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    I simply wrap the tape around the bar and shift housing until I get to the point where the two are diverging, then run the tape around only the bar. Pretty simple and I don't have any trouble with it.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by supcom View Post
    I simply wrap the tape around the bar and shift housing until I get to the point where the two are diverging, then run the tape around only the bar. Pretty simple and I don't have any trouble with it.
    Me too. I guess that I don't understand the problem.

  5. #5
    cab horn
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
    Me too. I guess that I don't understand the problem.
    +1

    Bar end shifters on road drops, ugh. Talk about shifters in the worst spot possible.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  6. #6
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    What you do is tape the cable housing up to the bottom of the brake handle hood, and sort of towards the inside of the hood. Now you let cable escape from the tape. Another way is to tape the cable housing until the bar starts to curve upward from the lower "flat" hand position, then let the cable go straight out and continue wrapping the bar. The third way is to tape the cable housing all the way to the center of the bar where the tape normally ends and where the aero lever brake cables come out of the tape.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by operator View Post
    +1

    Bar end shifters on road drops, ugh. Talk about shifters in the worst spot possible.
    They aren't as convenient as STI/Ergo but they are certainly easier to get to than downtube shifters.

  8. #8
    Senior Member BCRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    They aren't as convenient as STI/Ergo but they are certainly easier to get to than downtube shifters.

    No doubt about that at all. Especially when you're a tall guy on a large frame. It's a life threatening reach to where the downtube levers live......

    Keep in mind too that bar end shifters on drop bars are most typically used on cyclocross and touring bike setups where the tops are up even or darn near even with the saddle. So reaching to the levers on the end of the drop positions isn't anywhere near as big a deal as it would be on a serious fit style road racing bike.
    Model airplanes are cool too!.....

  9. #9
    cab horn
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    They aren't as convenient as STI/Ergo but they are certainly easier to get to than downtube shifters.
    Easier to get to, but more incovenient to use. The shifters are at the bar end where little force is required to make huge changes in steering. Longer cable and housing + handlebar clutter.

    Not so with dowtube shifters which are impart almost no force to the direction the bike is travelling. I can't think of a more idiotic and unsafe place to put a shifting unit. At all
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  10. #10
    Senior Member anti.team's Avatar
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    Agree with the above...Best way in my opinion would be to run the cable all the way under the tape.

    If that isn't an option (it wasn't for me) then just wrap over the cable for the first 3-4 wraps, then over just the bar. Where you make the transition, cut a small notch in the tape so that you can continue overlapping the tape. It's hard to describe, but you may understand when you start wrapping.
    Quote Originally Posted by crushkilldstroy View Post
    99% of the world already thinks you're a moron for riding a bike anyways so it doesn't really matter what shoes you're wearing.

  11. #11
    Senior Member spaceballs's Avatar
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    I think I did OK. I mean, my bike will still function. I think that my biggest problem was that the first time I tried this it was with some thick, foamy gel tape. This time I just used some cheaper cork tape and the operation went much smoother.

    I also noticed I have cracked one of my bar end shifters...maybe some brifters in the near future for me...

  12. #12
    Senior Member SweetLou's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by operator View Post
    Easier to get to, but more incovenient to use. The shifters are at the bar end where little force is required to make huge changes in steering. Longer cable and housing + handlebar clutter.

    Not so with dowtube shifters which are impart almost no force to the direction the bike is travelling. I can't think of a more idiotic and unsafe place to put a shifting unit. At all
    Have you used bar end shifters? My line stays straight and true. Little force might be needed to move the handlebars, but a greater distance is required. This is not a problem, since your hands remain on the bars. Since the bar ends are are basically even with the steerer tube, depending on how much reach your stem has, and the force is vertical, the bars don't really move. Now, STI where the force is tangent to the steering and much farther in front would apply more torque. Try it, stand your bike up and apply upward pressure on the end of your bars. You will notice no or very little movement. Now apply the same pressure inward on your brake levers, like you would with STI, much more movement.

    Or are you saying all shifting on the bars is bad?

  13. #13
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    Getting away a minute from the people weighing in with their unsolicited opinons on bar-end shifters, the key to good handlebar taping with bar-ends is to start at the top rather than the bottom.

    Starting at the top, tape as you would any bike, past the brake levers and down to the where the shift housings depart from the drops. Do an extra turn UNDER the shift housing and then lay the shift housing on this extra turn and now continue taping the bar OVER the shift housing until you reach the end of the bar.

    If you go from the bottom to the top you will always have a gap or will have to slot the tape. Going from the top to the bottom gives you a nice overlap at the exit point.

    Many do run the shift housings all the way up the bar but the standard housings that ship with the bar-ends aren't long enough. The standard way is to have the housings exit the bar at the spot where bar transitions from the curve to the straight of the drop.

    - Mark

  14. #14
    Senior Member spaceballs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
    start at the top rather than the bottom
    Will try it next time! Thanks!

  15. #15
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    If you start at the top, how do you cleanly stop at the bottom ?

    I start at the bottom of the drop, very close to the cable housing itself so the starting lump doesn't show. I also cut obliquely the tape to about 60 % of its width so that the first turn is done gradually without any kind of lump.

    Regarding the housings, I run them all the way, ergo style. The only drawback I see is that I need a rear cable in front and a tandem rear cable for behind.
    Michel Gagnon
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by operator View Post
    +1

    Bar end shifters on road drops, wow. Talk about shifters in the best spot imaginable.
    I found a typo in your post and fixed it...

    You're welcome.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
    key to good handlebar taping with bar-ends is to start at the top rather than the bottom.

    In my experience tape should always be started at the bottom. Then the higher-up layers will overlap the lower layers and the tape will not peel up when you slide yopur hands down the bars.

    Start at the bottom and wrap inwards, under the brake hoods, inwards, and backwards.. this will keep the edges from lifting - and actually tighten the tape as you ride (when you are powering forward and your hands twist slightly backwards like a mortorcycle throttle).

    But hey - it's your bike... do what you want

  18. #18
    biked well well biked's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by operator View Post
    +1

    Bar end shifters on road drops, ugh. Talk about shifters in the worst spot possible.

    Integrated brake lever/shifters obviously provide quicker, more ergonomic shifting than bar ends. But bar end shifters are the next best thing in that regard, and are much simpler, and therefore more durable and reliable. That's why tourists and 'cross riders like them so much. Anyone who has bike handling problems because of bar end shifters needs to learn to ride their bike-

  19. #19
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by operator View Post
    Easier to get to, but more incovenient to use. The shifters are at the bar end where little force is required to make huge changes in steering. Longer cable and housing + handlebar clutter.

    Not so with dowtube shifters which are impart almost no force to the direction the bike is travelling. I can't think of a more idiotic and unsafe place to put a shifting unit. At all
    I don't know how you can claim that operating a downtube shifter imparts almost no turning force to the bike. For most people, operating a downtube shifter requires removing one hand from the bars while leaning slightly forward. These actions definitely impart a torque on the handlebars that must be compensated. It's similar, but not quite as bad, as reaching for a water bottle - a skill that any competent cyclist can perform safely.

    Shifting a bar end shifter can be done with both hands on the bars, so, if anything, it's easier to compensate for any torque on the bars. But that torque doesn't really come from the shifting, since the shifter (if installed correctly) rotates vertically, which imposes very little torque. Any torque is going to be a result of the asymmetric hand placement, which frequently occurs regardless of shifter type.

    All of this is trivial for a competent cyclist to manage. Certainly no more difficult a skill than to push an STI lever without applying the brakes in the process.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarDasse74 View Post
    In my experience tape should always be started at the bottom.
    I doubt your experience includes wrapping bars with bar-end shifters.

    Bottom to top is the preferred method generally as it puts the non-overlapped edges of the tape in an orientation where they point to the outside of the bike so that hand movement towards the outside doesn't tend to raise the edge. But it doesn't work well if you have bar-ends and the housings need to exit from under the tape somewhere in the middle of the tape job. If you've ever done a wrap with bar-ends, you'd understand the problem: Bottom to top - unsightly gap in tape where housing exits; top to bottom - no gaps.

    As to the technique where the tape "tightens" naturally as you rotate your hands back, that's strictly a question of CW or CCW wrap direction and has nothing to do with whether you go top to bottom or bottom to top.

    Final comment: Technique and patience makes a lot more difference in the quality of the job than wrap direction or orientation. I've seen superb tape jobs done in the "wrong" way and they look great and work peachy.

    - Mark
    Last edited by markjenn; 08-22-08 at 12:27 PM.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by markjenn View Post
    I doubt your experience includes wrapping bars with bar-end shifters.

    Bottom to top is the preferred method generally as it puts the non-overlapped edges of the tape in an orientation where they point to the outside of the bike so that hand movement towards the outside doesn't tend to raise the edge. But it doesn't work well if you have bar-ends and the housings need to exit from under the tape somewhere in the middle of the tape job. If you've ever done a wrap with bar-ends, you'd understand the problem: Bottom to top - unsightly gap in tape where housing exits; top to bottom - no gaps.

    As to the technique where the tape "tightens" naturally as you rotate your hands back, that's strictly a question of CW or CCW wrap direction and has nothing to do with whether you go top to bottom or bottom to top.

    Final comment: Technique and patience makes a lot more difference in the quality of the job than wrap direction or orientation. I've seen superb tape jobs done in the "wrong" way and they look great and work -peachy.

    - Mark
    You can doubt my experience all you like - but just so you know, I have wrapped more than one of my own bikes and more than one for other people with drop bars and barcons. Yes it leaves a little more gap when wrapped my way, but this is a small* price to pay to acheive the best tape orientation resulting in superior wrap performance and longevity. Also, this "unsightly gap" is hidden beneath a cable at the bottom of the flats on a drop bar - not visible unless you are looking for it... which most people do not, as this is less important than the bars being wrapped correctly.

    *VERY small price to pay - while you can achieve some overlap when wrapping backwards (top-to-bottom), overlap is completely unnecessary - the tape underneath is held in place by the cable. If done properly, the gap can be 0mm laterally when wrapped bottom to top, and, as I said, only noticable if you are looking for it, and even then, only if you value the superficial over the functional.

    Cheers!

  22. #22
    Love that dirty water JoesInBoston's Avatar
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    markjenn, I used barends for a while and the gap is hardly noticable if.....you know.....you wrap the bars properly.

  23. #23
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    Let's let the OP try and both ways and see which is the cleaner job. This is really one of those things where there are pluses and minuses to both approaches, despite your wanting to make one way "correct and functional" and the other "incorrect and superficial.".

    - Mark

  24. #24
    Senior Member squirtdad's Avatar
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    What I did was get longer housings and exit the cables near the stem along with the brake cables. It works well (don't have a lot of miles on the bar ends yet) and IMHO looks way better.

    For what it's worth on the secondary discussion..... I went bar ends because a) I was curious as a lot of people like them and b) I was too cheap to go ultegra 9 STI

    I have found shifting no problem (but then I didn't really have a problem with down tube) and have had no issues with excessive steering input.

    The only issue i had was that I have found I have to be careful when stopped at a light so that I don't bump the shifters and then set myself up for an unplanned shift when I start up again

  25. #25
    Super Moderator
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    Bar end shifters were the secret weapon for many crit riders in the pre-brifter era. I used them to my advantage in many sprints, along with then-ridiculed aero wheels ("Why use TriSpokes? They're so heavy... Don't they catch too much wind? Aren't they hard to control? Why use Zipp 440s? Why use....").

    Although technically they do put the shifter at the "end" of the turning lever, in reality, with properly trimmed bars, they do not affect shifting significantly if the rider understands how to use them. I could shift multiple times in a 200-300 meter sprint and not have any problems.

    Likewise I could dive into a turn, change my mind about what gear to use exiting said turn, and make adjustments on one downstroke of the pedal.

    I specifically reduced the friction level so the shifter would shift quickly. I was also careful in setting up a low friction setup, adjusted the rear derailleur and chain length so the upper pulley was close to the cogs, and basically used every trick I knew to keep cable movement force as light as possible.

    Two bar end shifter equipped things...

    Bar ends for crits:
    http://sprinterdellacasa.blogspot.co...for-crits.html

    Sprint with shifting while using bar ends:
    http://sprinterdellacasa.blogspot.co...criterium.html

    For taping bars I have to find some old pictures but if you look at the first of the two links, you'll see I drilled out the bars and put the cable inside the bar. Before that I ran the cable housing up to the brake lever and let it poke out there. I've also run it all the way to the tops of the bar but I think the shifting wasn't very good. My second favorite position (after the drilled bar method) was to have the cable housing poke out a few inches from the shifter, on a slightly upward pointing bit of bar. This way the housing wouldn't droop. I wrapped my bars from the bottom all the time.

    cdr

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