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  1. #1
    Commie
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    to convert a Trek Hybrid

    I want to convert my Hybrid over to a semi roadie.

    it is a Trek fx 7.3. Right now im running 28c tire

    Replace triple crank with a double, shimano 105 i suppose.

    get drop bar's, ritchey? or some bontrager bars. I will of course need to get rid of the MTB brake levers, and get road bike levers and brakes..unless the road levers can control the V-brake i have now, which are very good brakes.

    need a new cassette, chain, front and rear derailer, probably 105 aswell.

    what else would i need? or should i just forget this project and buy a road bike for under a grand.

    the frame on this bike is pretty damn nice for what i paid. It's on the stiff side, but don't bother me.

  2. #2
    Senior Member z415's Avatar
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    I've heard Bontrager bars are no good. I personally prefer Oval Concepts. Ritchey, I have heard good things about, but I suppose this is all partial to personal preferences... ha, that a lot of times fast.

    You can use road levers on v-brakes with an adapter called a "travel agent".

    I think your bike is 8 speed - you don't necessarily need a new RD, FD, or cassette.

    Honestly, I would say it might be better just to buy a bike and sell this one. This could be expensive.

    If you want cheap, I think all you would need are Sora 8s shifters, a drop bar of 25.4 mm, and two travel agents and metric Allen keys and won't be over $150, if anywhere near that depending on your preferences for tools, bar, etc. That should be functional and stuff, though I might be missing something.
    Falling is learning...[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]...learn to not fall in a box.
    Any good American will watch THIS -and- WHERE WAS MY BIKE MADE?

  3. #3
    Senior Member BCRider's Avatar
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    Unless you're only looking for a new riding position to get more options for your hands I'd suck it up and buy a real road bike. They really are a whole different animal from stem to stern.

    The geometry of the frame is different which is a biggie. But in addition your present wheelset is likely wider than typical for a road bike. A good road bike with a nice wheelset will use reduced spoke counts as well as the better ones will have butted spokes for a little less drag. Then there's the riding position which is quite a bit more aggesive than a hybrid. Even a hybrid with drop bars. Then there's all the other components that are shaved down to the bare minimum for weight. A sub 20 lb bike feels like heaven. And unless you can get down under or at least very close to that magic number you're doomed to not truly feel what you're chasing after.

    I've had a couple of road bikes in my days and truly there's nothing like a good road bike for speed and responsiveness. I didn't keep either of them for long since around here if you can't use fenders then the days you can ride are numbered when you have other things to do as well. But there's no doubt that a serious road bike is the Grand Turismo of bicycling. Trying to convert something to a road bike that will never be a road bike is pretty much doomed to mediocrity and will shortchange your experience.

    I'd also suggest that if you can possibly swing the cash that a new road bike more around the $1500 mark will be money well spent. For your extra $500 you'll get a nicer upscale frame and moderately better components. From what I've seen in looking around this seems to be the range where you're buying the best bang for the buck. Alternately do some homework and learn the models then buy a used $1500 bike for around $900 to $1000 and get a deal. There seems to be a lot of low mileage road bikes from folks that thought it would get them out exercising and it didn't work that way.
    Last edited by BCRider; 08-24-08 at 01:50 AM.
    Model airplanes are cool too!.....

  4. #4
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    And if you drive an SUV, put some racing car tires on it and you've got instant sports car. Seriously, a conversion like this is a waste of time and money. Keep the hybrid if you've got room for it, or sell it and get a road bike. Even an entry-level road bike will be better and will provide you with 99% of what any road bike can do.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Longfemur View Post
    And if you drive an SUV, put some racing car tires on it and you've got instant sports car. Seriously, a conversion like this is a waste of time and money. Keep the hybrid if you've got room for it, or sell it and get a road bike. Even an entry-level road bike will be better and will provide you with 99% of what any road bike can do.
    I am in 100% disagreement with this... a converted hybrid bike will make an awesome road bike... but is more accurately called a 'touring' bike... I don't know what you think the advantage of having a 'road' bike is (it is really only a manufacturer designation, and hybrid bikes, road sport bikes, flat bar road bikes, touring bikes, and road bikes are all clustered together on the same 'road worthiness' spectrum, IMHO).

    Your example of changing the tires on an SUV is innacurate.. take an SUV, change the body shape (flat to drop bars), driver controls (flat bar levers/shifters to STI brifters), drop and stiffen the suspension and change the (wide hybrid tires to narrow road tires) and you do indeed have a sports car... it's just that all these changes are easier to make on a bicycle, but just as effective.

  6. #6
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    never say never








  7. #7
    Death fork? Naaaah!! top506's Avatar
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    This is a worthy endeavor.
    I built up a Miyata Triplecross hybird with drops and 700x32 tires mainly to ride on dirt roads and it's turned out to be the closest thing to an all-purpose bike I've ever seen.



    Not the best picture, but you get the idea.
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    You know it's going to be a good day when the stem and seatpost come right out.

  8. #8
    Senior Member fcormier's Avatar
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    Like what was said previously, with your hybrid's geometry, if you change the handlebar, brake levers and shifters, you'll get a touring bike. Touring bikes can be good for road riding, just not as fast as a real road bike (weight, geometry).

    Here are some things to consider (some were mentioned above):
    -Road levers are not compatible with regular V-brakes, with the exception of the Dia-Compe 287 aero levers, which are not STI. If you use these, you can install Shimano bar end shifters. you may be able to use mini V brakes (with shorter arms) with regular road levers.
    -Road stems and hybrid stems have a different size of clamp (road: 26.0 mm - hybrid: 25.4 mm). Like a previous poster said, you may be able to get a 25.4 mm road bar.
    -Road shifters are not compatible with a mountain/hybrid front derailleur (from what I've read). You may need to change you front derailleur.
    Road and long commute: 2008.5 Kona Jake
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  9. #9
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    Heh, heh... 25.4mm bars are easy. SR makes quite a few of them and they're usually less than $10. The easiest drivetrain option is to use bar-cons in friction mode. That way, you can re-use your derailleurs and cogs.

    While road-levers don't have the long throw that V-brakes need, you can add a Travel Agent pulley to double the cable-pull:


  10. #10
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    +1 Sell it and buy a road bike. That would be much cheaper.

    If you are looking for additional hand positions, try Trekking bars, That way you can keep the existing controls.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by gascostalot View Post
    never say never



    Meh...



    Bleh...



    *YAWN*

    Meow!

  12. #12
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    What exactly is your goal? You say "semi roadie". If you want more hand positions a treking bar would be a cheap option. You are already running 700x28 tires which many (ok some) of us use on our road bikes. If you want a touring type bike with dropped handlebars to reduce wind resistance and give more hand options this may be an ok idea.
    If you want to ride fast I would take the other advice to sell this and look for a road bike. I have found good luck with sub 1000$ road bikes but be forewarned they may not be as comfortable to ride as your current bike. Converting from a triple to a double chainring is an expensive waste of time. Many road bikes come with triples and although you may not need them they add very little weight (in my opinion) for what you get . What kind of riding do you do now and what would you do differently if you converted this bike.
    There is a group of fast riders in my area who ride in a peloton once a week, there is one guy who rides a mountain bike with knobby tires who keeps pace with the group. I suspect he may be the best rider in the bunch despite not riding a road bike.
    Piecemeal parts upgrades quickly can get expensive. If you like to tinker with your bike buy a good used one off craigs list- this can be anything from an 70-80's steel classic to a modern carbon racing bike. Check out craigs list with a little patience you will be amazed at what you gan get. Good luck

  13. #13
    NadaKid wayne pattee's Avatar
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    I buy used road bikes cause I like to work on them.
    $5 for this one

    $75 for this one

  14. #14
    Senior Member z415's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by top506 View Post
    This is a worthy endeavor.
    I built up a Miyata Triplecross hybird with drops and 700x32 tires mainly to ride on dirt roads and it's turned out to be the closest thing to an all-purpose bike I've ever seen.



    Not the best picture, but you get the idea.
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    For a second there I thought those were clouds and the bike was flying.... if so, I would have ran out and gotten a hybrid just to convert!
    Falling is learning...[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]...learn to not fall in a box.
    Any good American will watch THIS -and- WHERE WAS MY BIKE MADE?

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