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  1. #1
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    Can't get seatpost unstuck!

    The seatpost on my Specialized Hardrock is stuck real tight in position. I've only had this bike for a few years, and it's stuck real good. I had a bike for 12 years that had a stuck seatpost and I was able to free it with one application of WD40. But with this Hardrock, I've used WD40 repeatedly and it did no good. Then I took someone's advice and used Liquid Wrench repeatedly, and it hasn't helped either. I've even removed one of the accessory bolts from the seattube and turned the bike upside down and sprayed Liquid Wrench into it so that it get to the seattube from the inside. I've also taken off the seat and put a wood block on top of the post and whacked it really hard many times to try to break it free. Still no luck. Is there anything else that can be done. Would a bike shop even be able to fix this?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Novakane's Avatar
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    Search the forums for stuck seat posts - you'll find a wealth of info.

  3. #3
    Senior Member bikeman715's Avatar
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    try ammonia instead of WD-40, we are talking about a aluminum frame here ,aren't we ? IF we aren't it can take a long time for wd-40 or liquid wrench to work. try puting the post in a vise and try pulling on the frame and over time it should come out.if you are in a hurry then you need to cut the post 1"above the frame and use a hacksaw blade to cut the post in half or 1/3 and use a tool to knot it out.just don't cut into the frame.

  4. #4
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    PB-Blaster works WAY WAY better than liquid-wrench.

  5. #5
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    Thank you all for the help! Actually, this bike is Chro-moly. That's what the frame material is. I don't know the material of the seatpost.

  6. #6
    Junior Member jimbooth's Avatar
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    The ammonia will still help, it's probably corrosion set up between two dissimilar metals - the alum seat post and the steel tube.

  7. #7
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    It would probably be a good idea to figure out what material the seat post is made of (aluminum or steel) before applying things like ammonia. Seeing if a magnet will stick or looking up the bike in bikepedia.com are at least two options.

  8. #8
    Selfish bitter clinger.
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    I have also used a pipe wrench on a stuck aluminum post in a steel frame to twist it out. I got it out but the post was damaged. Regular checks and greasing is done now.
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  9. #9
    )) <> (( illwafer's Avatar
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    you will probably need to cut it with a hacksaw. i did this for one of my bikes. the previous owner must have sweat all over the place and that created a crazy bond that nothing could penetrate.

    it is not hard to do, it just takes a while and is very tiring. cut down the length of the seat tube until you get to the frame. then take a pliers and try bending the post in on itself. if it still sticks, cut another slit...and another and another until you get it all out. i probably cut like 8 slits to get mine out.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mondoman View Post
    It would probably be a good idea to figure out what material the seat post is made of (aluminum or steel) before applying things like ammonia. Seeing if a magnet will stick or looking up the bike in bikepedia.com are at least two options.
    I put a magnet up the the seatpost last night. It didn't stick, so I guess it's not steel. I also had taken the seat off the post to make it easier to work on. Now the seat is back on, but it tilts forward and causes me to keep slipping forward when I ride. Is there a way to adjust this?

  11. #11
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    Loosening the seat mounting bolt or bolts should allow you to adjust the tilt of the seat, as well as its front/back position.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mondoman View Post
    Loosening the seat mounting bolt or bolts should allow you to adjust the tilt of the seat, as well as its front/back position.
    There seems to be only one mounting bot, and it's located in back of the seatpost. When I loosen it, it allows me to move the seat forward and backward, but doesn't allow me to adjust the tilt.

  13. #13
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    I found out how to do it. There's an elongated hole in the seat bracket that's in contact with the seatpost. I can move it forward and back before tightening the seatbolt to adjust the tilt.

  14. #14
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    yo

    don't destroy your bottom bracket with all those chemicals--- also, be patient--- it takes a few days sometimes to let all that stuff do its job-- dont build a pipe bomb---

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