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Old 09-06-08, 08:01 AM   #1
cmcanulty
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changing freewheel to cassette

Is it possible to change from a freewheel to a cassette? If so what is involved? Thanks
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Old 09-06-08, 08:08 AM   #2
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Basically, you'll need a new hub.

Sheldon's site shows, discusses, and compares freewheel and cassette configurations.

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/freewheels.html
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Old 09-06-08, 08:31 AM   #3
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Yep, thats about the gist of it. You'll need a new hub. Freewheels are 'spun' on to a threaded hub while cassette cogs slip onto a splined hub and secured by a lockring. When bike manufacturers went to 8-speed in the late 80's or early 90's, that was the end of Freewheels.
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Old 09-06-08, 10:07 AM   #4
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By the time you pay to have your wheel rebuilt with the new hub laced into the rim, and probably pay for the new spokes since it's likely the hubs don't have the same flange diameter you may as well just buy a new wheel and new cassette.
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Old 09-06-08, 01:48 PM   #5
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I'm with BC Rider on this one - the only viable option is a new wheel; keep your old one as a spare, just in case!
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Old 09-06-08, 02:48 PM   #6
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Actually, I've found that many rear hubs do have the same flange diameter and spacing, or at least close enough that they can be changed out using the same rim and spokes.

I've rebuilt two rear wheels, one with an old 36H Shimano freewheel hub (model unknown) and one with a Maillard 36H freewheel hub substituting Shimano Acera X (cheap - one was salvaged from my LBS's discard bin) 36H freehubs in both cases.

The original spokes were the right length so I was able to do a direct relace replacing only the hub itself.
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