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  1. #1
    Senior Member cantdrv55's Avatar
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    Can't remove right side pedal

    I'd like to replace my rusted out pedals but I can't sem to get the pedal on the right off. I've sprayed it down with WD40 and left it soak for a couple of hours but that thing is on there tight. I've stripped off three 15mm wrenches in the process as well as the nut itself. It is a righty-tighty-lefty-loosey, correct? Please tell me I'n not going about this the wrong way. I've tried to unscrew the other way, hoping to break the hold free but no go. Can you think of another way other than drilling the thing out from the back of the pedal? Too bad there's no Allen there.

    Also, how do I keep the crank from back pedaling? I don't have a stand so I'm just using my strength (no wonder I can't take the stupid thing off).

  2. #2
    cab horn
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    Drive side pedal is normal threaded. Non drive is reversed.

    You need to take the crank out of the bike and put it in a vice. Sounds like you've already pooched it good on the wrench flats though.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  3. #3
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    rightside pedal is rightsy tightsy, lefty loosey. (and the left side is rightsy loosey) liguid wrench is also another good penetrating product. had this problem a few times, and like you- no stand. so i took my wrench and slipped a pipe over it, extending the handle length, therfor extending my leverage to try to break it loose. you may need another person to hold the other pedalside steady as you try to break loose that stubborn pedal. leverage works wonders, but make sure your extended handle is on the wrench securly so you don't slip. a rag over the handle helped make it not so hard on my hands when i went to break free my own stubborn pedal. bike with wheels in the air or on the ground, you can try both ways. wheels on ground worked for me.

  4. #4
    Senior Member BCRider's Avatar
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    If you hold the wrench so it's inside the arc of the pedal so you're pushing down towards or away from the bottom bracket axle it makes things easier to put more force into the job. Then hold the crank on the other side of the bike to counter the torquing you're doing. That'll give you the mechanical advantage you need. Just watch that you don't catch your knuckles or fingers in between the wrench and the crank arm when it lets go.....
    Model airplanes are cool too!.....

  5. #5
    Senior Member cantdrv55's Avatar
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    Thanks guys!

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    Heat can help. Aluminum alloys expand more than steel when heated. It may screw up the finish, though. But, if nothing else works...

  7. #7
    Senior Member rodrigaj's Avatar
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    Be careful.

    After partially tearing my right distal bicept tendon in March doing the same thing you describe, I now take my bike to the LBS for pedal installs.

    Distal bicept tendon partial tears have recovery times of 6 to 9 months. I'm finally back to about 90% strength in my right arm. I was lucky and did not require surgery, just lots and lots of PT.

  8. #8
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    As og suggested, a "penetrating oil" is much more likely to work than WD-40. Liquid Wrench is commonly available, but I prefer PB Blaster (also commonly available). Many swear by "Kroil", which is not commonly available.

  9. #9
    Senior Member BCRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodrigaj View Post
    Be careful.

    After partially tearing my right distal bicept tendon in March doing the same thing you describe, I now take my bike to the LBS for pedal installs.

    Distal bicept tendon partial tears have recovery times of 6 to 9 months. I'm finally back to about 90% strength in my right arm. I was lucky and did not require surgery, just lots and lots of PT.
    This is why I use a method that uses the bike itself for leverage.

    Sounds painful, heal fast and heal well.
    Model airplanes are cool too!.....

  10. #10
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
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    Placing a wrench-handle in a length of pipe will increase the torque being applied dramatically.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cateye View Post
    Only panthers007 is stupid enough to believe that this is a good idea.

  11. #11
    Senior Member cantdrv55's Avatar
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    Thanks again and sorry to hear about your arm. I hope you heal fast and well.

    I've tried the breaker bar method but am afraid that the nut is too stripped to budge. Will try PB Blaster and then set it in a vice. If that fails, I'm drilling the bad boy out.

  12. #12
    Steelhead bum eelriver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike_s View Post
    Heat can help. Aluminum alloys expand more than steel when heated. It may screw up the finish, though. But, if nothing else works...
    Just don't set your bike on fire.

  13. #13
    messenger
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    Quote Originally Posted by ogbigbird View Post
    rightside pedal is rightsy tightsy, lefty loosey. (and the left side is rightsy loosey) liguid wrench is also another good penetrating product. had this problem a few times, and like you- no stand. so i took my wrench and slipped a pipe over it, extending the handle length, therfor extending my leverage to try to break it loose. you may need another person to hold the other pedalside steady as you try to break loose that stubborn pedal. leverage works wonders, but make sure your extended handle is on the wrench securly so you don't slip. a rag over the handle helped make it not so hard on my hands when i went to break free my own stubborn pedal. bike with wheels in the air or on the ground, you can try both ways. wheels on ground worked for me.
    ya...... I agree.... Makers is the best whiskey on the market today.... and leaverage with the proper pedal
    wrench is good too-- with a little salt..

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