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Old 10-10-08, 01:19 PM   #1
*Scuba
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What type of sandpaper is best for tire puncture repair?

Hi all,

I just had a rear tire puncture a few days ago due to a piece of broken nail. In the end I didn't patch the tire, I just put in a new one. The nail had gone all the way through and put holes on both side of the inner tube. I just didn't feel it was worth the time and energy to repair something like that. I will keep the old tube for DIY projects though. Like cutting it up for patches or using sections of it to protect the bike.

The main question that I had was that the patch kit I had only had the metal rasp and no sandpaper. What type of sandpaper would work well on feathering and preparing an inner tube for a glue on patch. One of the holes on my tube was right next to a ridge and I had never been able to get those smoothed out well with the metal rasps. Often time I damage the tires further. What grit sandpaper works well and should I get?

Thanks all in advance.
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Old 10-10-08, 01:28 PM   #2
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I've got a 100 grit emery sanding belt laying around that seems to work pretty good.
It appears to be a pretty good balance between "gouging" and clogging. IF I were to go different, I'd go slightly coarser, but not much.
Get a wet/dry type, if you immerse your tubes in water to find leaks. A couple drops of water dissolves a dry only type.

I remove too much skin with the metal rasp!
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Old 10-10-08, 02:03 PM   #3
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Steal an emery board from your wife or girlfriend. They're perfect for that and for dressing brake shoes. In a pinch you can even buy your own since they're available everywhere and they don't cost much.
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Old 10-10-08, 02:21 PM   #4
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You dont need to feather the tube and remove mold lines. You only have to break up the release compound left on the tire from the manufacturing process. The little metal rasp provided with the parch kit is quite adequate for this.
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Old 10-10-08, 02:29 PM   #5
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You dont need to feather the tube and remove mold lines. You only have to break up the release compound left on the tire from the manufacturing process. The little metal rasp provided with the parch kit is quite adequate for this.
so that is all you have to do ...is clean the rubber ? I thought you had to make scuffs

hell I will go easier next time. I never had a patch go bad on me but I scour the crap
out of every repair first



on a side note, are any self adhesive patches, the one step ones, any good ? I have some but am afraid
to actually use them and always keep using good old scuff-[sniff]-squeeze the goo-stick method
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Old 10-10-08, 02:47 PM   #6
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the one step ones are for temp use only. like if you are in the middle of nowhere and need to get home or to a shop ,then replace the patch with glue/patch one or the tube.
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Old 10-10-08, 03:01 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
so that is all you have to do ...is clean the rubber ? I thought you had to make scuffs

hell I will go easier next time. I never had a patch go bad on me but I scour the crap
out of every repair first



on a side note, are any self adhesive patches, the one step ones, any good ? I have some but am afraid
to actually use them and always keep using good old scuff-[sniff]-squeeze the goo-stick method
Frankly I thought you had to expose virgin rubber... as the glue is a vulcanizing compound... and the patch itself is fresh and clean new rubber.

I've never had a patch fail, so I think I'll continue to expose good fresh virgin rubber... beyond just "cleaning" the rubber.
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Old 10-10-08, 03:06 PM   #8
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If you are doing the repair at home, don't use sandpaper at all. Instead, use a little Brake Klean or carb cleaner. Just wet a little spot on a shop towel and rub the gloss off the tube. bk
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Old 10-10-08, 03:11 PM   #9
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Park Tools?
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Old 10-10-08, 03:21 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genec View Post
Frankly I thought you had to expose virgin rubber... as the glue is a vulcanizing compound... and the patch itself is fresh and clean new rubber.

I've never had a patch fail, so I think I'll continue to expose good fresh virgin rubber... beyond just "cleaning" the rubber.
Yes, patches with vulcanizing fluid work best when fresh rubber is exposed. Don't just scuff up the surface, remove the slick mould-release surface completely down to black rubber.
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Old 10-10-08, 04:17 PM   #11
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I have had good luck using a drywall sanding sponge. I put my fingers in back of the perforation and briskly rub with the sponge; much easier than the metal abraders that come in the patch kits.
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Old 10-10-08, 04:17 PM   #12
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If you are doing the repair at home, don't use sandpaper at all. Instead, use a little Brake Klean or carb cleaner. Just wet a little spot on a shop towel and rub the gloss off the tube. bk
+1, lacquer thinner works for me...
Bud
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Old 10-10-08, 05:09 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genec View Post
Frankly I thought you had to expose virgin rubber... as the glue is a vulcanizing compound... and the patch itself is fresh and clean new rubber.

I've never had a patch fail, so I think I'll continue to expose good fresh virgin rubber... beyond just "cleaning" the rubber.
The glue used is just that, glue. It's not some magical vulcanizing fluid. Heat is what vulcanizes the rubber. It doesn't happen in bike tires, but it does in automotive tires. The glue needs a clean surface to stick to. You can get that with sandpaper, or a solvent.
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Old 10-10-08, 06:23 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
Steal an emery board from your wife or girlfriend.
What if I don't have one?

I was always under the impression that the "glue" was a type of contact cement. Thats why the instructions tell you to let it dry

I have had a patch and my pump fail on me and it was no fun. I didn't have my phone either. I was about 15 miles from my house. Gratefully someone stopped and had a tube and a pump! He said it would be good karma for him. Two days later I was on the same road headed to work and there was a guy walking with a flat tire so I picked him up and drove him to his house (in the opposite direction about 10 miles). Funny how things work sometimes.
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Old 10-10-08, 06:39 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
so that is all you have to do ...is clean the rubber ? I thought you had to make scuffs
Exactly. Clean the molding compound off the tube, let the cement dry before you put the patch on, and the tube and patch will be one. If you don't do this, you'll trap contaminants between the patch and tube and they'll eventually bite you.
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Old 10-10-08, 07:09 PM   #16
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Well removing the contaminants pretty much means scuffing off the layer on the top until the rubber has a soft flat black look to it.

I'll have to try the brake cleaner trick but I know for sure that acetone and lacquer thinners and other solvents of that sort dissolve the rubber. THat's why the paper towel or whatever you use comes away black. So in a way you have gotten down to the fresh rubber below but just not by using abrasives.

In the end if the patch lifts you didn't work the area hard enough or long enough. A patch that has been pressed firmly into place and left for 5 minutes or so should be able to withstand the tube being stretched at all angles without lifting from the surface. If it passes that test then your method and technique are good. If it lifts then it's not.
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