Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    How the heck do you remove this Bottom Bracket?

    So, I am a beginner. But I must say, I have learned a lot thus far . . . how however, I have run into a snag.
    While stripping down my bike, I got it down to the to the bottom brackets. Now I've searched all over the net, and can't find a way to remove this specific kind. Do I need special tools? If so, which ones? Whats the best way to tackle this bad boy?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Saratoga, CA
    Posts
    11,496
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Tools needed:

    1. lockring tool to remove lockring from adjustable-cup (2nd pic)
    2. pin-spanner to turn adjustable-cup
    3. fixed-cup tool to remove the fixed-cup (1st pic).

    In my earlier pre-teen days, I've used:

    1. hammer and flat-screwdriver to undo the lockring
    2. needle-nose pliers, put the tips into the depressions in the cup and turn
    3. big channel-lock pliers to undo the fixed-cup. Remember that this is reverse-threaded, so you turn it to the right (clockwise) to remove.

  3. #3
    Last one to the top... Little Darwin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Wilkes-Barre, PA
    My Bikes
    Many
    Posts
    6,793
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    And the pre-teen tools are fine, especially if you plan to replace it with a more modern BB.

    By the way, I have found that for me channel-locks also work well for the lock ring.

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm definitely going to replace the bracket, therefore I plan to use the pre-teen way. :-)

    Does the locking screw off or pop off? Should I get a flathead screwdriver, line it up perpendicular with the bike and start hacking away with a hammer in order to pop it off?

    Thanks for the advice.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    114
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Oh man, do you store your bike at the beach?? I clicked on the left image and was shocked. Hopefully the internals aren't corroded like that.

  6. #6
    Senior Member biker128pedal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Eastern VA
    My Bikes
    Madone 5.0, Old Trek 412, Shogun 1500, Diamondback Topanga frame (Warranty replacement of broken Raleigh)
    Posts
    719
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There is not too much corrosion. You may want to soak it with a little PB Penetrating Catalyst to loosen the threads.

    PB Blaster
    Mike
    Madone 5.0, Old Trek 412, Shogun 1500
    Diamondback Topanga frame (Warranty replacement of broken Raleigh)

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    A Latvian in Seattle
    Posts
    1,020
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can make your own fixed-cup tool for a few dollars by following Sheldon Brown's suggestion: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tooltips/bbcups.html

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,228
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by imoprefontaine View Post
    I'm definitely going to replace the bracket, therefore I plan to use the pre-teen way. :-)

    Does the locking screw off or pop off? Should I get a flathead screwdriver, line it up perpendicular with the bike and start hacking away with a hammer in order to pop it off?

    Thanks for the advice.
    It screws off. Put the punch in a slot, tangent to the ring, and whack with a hammer. Then go to the next slot, and do the same thing. Once it starts, it should get easier to turn. AS others have said, spray everything with penetrating oil, and let it soak. Spray it twice every day, if you can wait a couple days.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Beverly Hills, MI
    My Bikes
    '72 Fuji Finest, '06 Fuji Team Issue, '06 Salsa Las Cruces, Nashbar Frame single speed
    Posts
    537
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by imoprefontaine View Post
    I'm definitely going to replace the bracket, therefore I plan to use the pre-teen way. :-)

    Does the locking screw off or pop off? Should I get a flathead screwdriver, line it up perpendicular with the bike and start hacking away with a hammer in order to pop it off?

    Thanks for the advice.
    Everything screws off. The fixed cup is the one on the right (chain) side. You can probably also use a very large crescent wrench (like 15") on the flats, but the channel locks will be easier, as long as the handles are long enough.
    Doug

    '72 Fuji Finest
    '06 Fuji Team Issue
    '06 Salsa Las Cruces
    Nashbar Single Speed

  10. #10
    Senior Member bobbyahines's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    My Bikes
    Bridgestone RB-2, Bridgestone CB-2, Specialized Hard Rock
    Posts
    76
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just for clarification, the Fixed Cup (1st picture) is reverse threaded (lefty tighty, righty loosey), while the lockring and adjustable cup are regular threading. Sounds like a fun project!

    -Bobby
    Mechanic/Service Manager for Hello Bicycle.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    The Only Village in the World So Named
    My Bikes
    Mid '70s Cuevas, '91 Greg Lemond Maillot Jaune
    Posts
    136
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bobbyahines View Post
    Just for clarification, the Fixed Cup (1st picture) is reverse threaded (lefty tighty, righty loosey), while the lockring and adjustable cup are regular threading. Sounds like a fun project!

    -Bobby
    All 100% correct
    Quote Originally Posted by marengo View Post
    And I thought Trek was the Trek of bicycles

  12. #12
    Senior Member bluenote157's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    DC
    My Bikes
    Surly CC, Raleigh Team Pro, Specialized Rockhopper
    Posts
    949
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    heck..if you are going to replace it, use a vise wrench.
    The lockring will screw off counter clockwise...so you want to hammer in that direction to get it going.
    With the lip that is exposed once you have the lockring off, get the vise wrench and go at it..
    ..maybe use it on the fixed cup side as well.

    If it is a french bike, the threading is different in terms of screwing clockwise/counterclockwise.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    St Peters, Missouri
    My Bikes
    Rans Enduro Sport, Hase Kettweisel Tandem, Merin Bear Valley beater bike
    Posts
    23,100
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DannoXYZ View Post
    Tools needed:

    1. lockring tool to remove lockring from adjustable-cup (2nd pic)
    2. pin-spanner to turn adjustable-cup
    3. fixed-cup tool to remove the fixed-cup (1st pic).

    In my earlier pre-teen days, I've used:

    1. hammer and flat-screwdriver to undo the lockring
    2. needle-nose pliers, put the tips into the depressions in the cup and turn
    3. big channel-lock pliers to undo the fixed-cup. Remember that this is reverse-threaded, so you turn it to the right (clockwise) to remove.
    All true as far as it goes.

    The big issue sometimes is removing the drive side cup. That's sometimes called the fixed cup with good justification. The trick is to get whatever you're using as a tool to stay in contact while you put a LOT of torque to it. There are various commercial gizmos that you can buy which hold your BB tool flat against the fixed cup. You can bodge your own with a long bolt to extend through the BB shell and a couple of big washers. I've even heard of guys using a c-clamp for that purpose.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    231
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    For the fixed cup, I just soak the thing in penetrating oil overnight and take a large channel-lock plier to it. Note: the plier surface is much wider than the fixed cup tool surface, so take care when applying torque. I usually slowly increase the torque until the plier is nice and snug with the cup and then smack the handle of the plier a bunch with a large spanner. Seems to do the trick.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •