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  1. #1
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    I am finally getting my bike rack on my car and am wondering what is to prevent someone from stealing your seatpost and seat? I suppose they could steal just about any of the bike if they wanted with the exception of the part (s) secured by the lock cable.

    I am the most concerned about having my saddle stolen. I would almost rather lose my bike than my saddle. Anyone have any tips on a device etc.?

  2. #2
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    Run a cable through the seat rails and lock it to the frame (or rack). There is a small diameter cable available for this, but you could just use an ordinary cable lock.

  3. #3
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    Why dont you put a strip of tape on your seatpost to mark the correct height, then remove the seat and post and keep it in the car trunk. You could also replace the QR bolt with old fashion hex nut and bolt.

  4. #4
    Senior Member randya's Avatar
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    Pitlock makes a replacement security bolt for the seatpost QR.

  5. #5
    blithering idiot jhota's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewP
    Why dont you put a strip of tape on your seatpost to mark the correct height, then remove the seat and post and keep it in the car trunk. You could also replace the QR bolt with old fashion hex nut and bolt.
    this is what i do. unless it is raining.

  6. #6
    My own worst nightmare
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    There's a thing called a "seat leash". Thin twisted cable (like a cable lock) with one swaged big end and one swaged small end. You loop the cable around a seat stay, then push the big end thru the small end. Then you remove the seat from the post temporarily, and put the seat post hardware thru the big end as you reassemble it. Voila! You can raise or lower the seat as much as you want, even pull it all the way out of the tube. But it's "tethered" to the bike, and would require a tool to remove the seat from the post to go dixie with it (which is exactly where you'd be with a non-QR binder). Visit http://www.planetbike.com/list/ and search for the word "leash" for a better idea of what I'm talking about. Your LBS should have 'em for $3-5.

  7. #7
    One knee is enough SchreiberBike's Avatar
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    The really cool folks use part of an old chain (drive chain, like between your cranks and your cogs). Shorten it with a chain tool so that it's just long enough to go between your saddle rails and your seat stays. Then put it inside a bit of old inner tube and using a chain tool, close it up again.

    Looks cool to me at least.
    "The more you tighten your grip . . . the more star systems will slip through your fingers."

  8. #8
    I drink your MILKSHAKE Raiyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SchreiberBike
    The really cool folks use part of an old chain (drive chain, like between your cranks and your cogs). Shorten it with a chain tool so that it's just long enough to go between your saddle rails and your seat stays. Then put it inside a bit of old inner tube and using a chain tool, close it up again.

    Looks cool to me at least.
    Now there's a novel idea.

  9. #9
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    Kryptonite makes locks for the seatpost and wheels. I purchased them, but I haven't used them. I talked to the Kryptonite reps at the bike show, and they explained that the quick release locks down the seatpost and wheels, then you keep the key and no one can steal those things off your bike. After that, all you need is a good solid lock to lock down your bike frame. I was impressed. I'm getting one for all my bikes.

    Koffee

  10. #10
    Senior Member bg4533's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Koffee Brown
    Kryptonite makes locks for the seatpost and wheels. I purchased them, but I haven't used them. I talked to the Kryptonite reps at the bike show, and they explained that the quick release locks down the seatpost and wheels, then you keep the key and no one can steal those things off your bike. After that, all you need is a good solid lock to lock down your bike frame. I was impressed. I'm getting one for all my bikes.

    Koffee
    I use the Kryptonite locking skewers. They work very well. I trimmed the bolt down on my seat lock because it was a bit long and it ended up stripping though. My fault I guess. Anyway, you need a "key" ro remove the skewers. Just remember to take the key with you so you can remove the tires if you get a flat.

    Since my seat lock broke I bought a regular seat collar that needs a hex wrench to adjust and put that on. Since I never adjust the seat height I filled the wrench hole with candle wax and put a piece of electrical tape over it. This is harder to remove then one would think. I leave my bike out until after mindnight a few days a week on the ohio state campus and have not had a problem yet.

  11. #11
    Senior Member bg4533's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SchreiberBike
    The really cool folks use part of an old chain (drive chain, like between your cranks and your cogs). Shorten it with a chain tool so that it's just long enough to go between your saddle rails and your seat stays. Then put it inside a bit of old inner tube and using a chain tool, close it up again.

    Looks cool to me at least.
    Cool idea as well. You could also use a bit of heat shrink tubing on the chain.

  12. #12
    Can't ride enough! Da Tinker's Avatar
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    Haven't looked for it lately, but there is a seatpost retainer that is internal to the bike. A cable is anchored inside the seatpost, runs down the seattube, and a knob on the end of the cable is trapped by an overlength bottle cage bolt, which protrudes into the seattube.
    Happiness begins with facing life with a smile & a wink.

  13. #13
    Sweetened with Splenda
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    Quote Originally Posted by SchreiberBike
    The really cool folks use part of an old chain (drive chain, like between your cranks and your cogs). Shorten it with a chain tool so that it's just long enough to go between your saddle rails and your seat stays. Then put it inside a bit of old inner tube and using a chain tool, close it up again.

    Looks cool to me at least.
    I do this on my commuter, which stays locked outside during the workday... but I bet the weight weenies would hate the idea

    -chris

  14. #14
    Desert tortise lsits's Avatar
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    Is there a way you could change the quick-release clamp to a bolt-on clamp? That way a thief would need an wrench to remove the seat post. I really don't understand the need for quick-release seat posts anyway. It might be a little inconvenient when setting up saddle height, but once it's set you shouldn't have to mess with it too often (unless more than one person rides the bike).
    Wish I didn't know now what I didn't know then. - Bob Seger

  15. #15
    My own worst nightmare
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    Quote Originally Posted by lsits
    I really don't understand the need for quick-release seat posts anyway. It might be a little inconvenient when setting up saddle height, but once it's set you shouldn't have to mess with it too often (unless more than one person rides the bike).
    If you frequently carry the bike inside a car, you can often fit it better with the seat pulled out. This is why I like the seat leash. The seat comes out of the frame, but stays with the bike.

  16. #16
    Senior Member bg4533's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lsits
    Is there a way you could change the quick-release clamp to a bolt-on clamp? That way a thief would need an wrench to remove the seat post. I really don't understand the need for quick-release seat posts anyway. It might be a little inconvenient when setting up saddle height, but once it's set you shouldn't have to mess with it too often (unless more than one person rides the bike).
    Link

    Just pop off the old collar and slide one of these on.

  17. #17
    Seņor Mambo
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    Veratomic quick-locks are pretty trick.

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