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  1. #1
    Eastern or Go Home EasternJane's Avatar
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    How about this grease?

    http://www.valvoline.com/pages/produ...asp?product=69
    Good for front/rear hub bearings?
    Right now im using White Lithium grease, but it sucks after a week.

    EDIT: Link fixed. I dont know why it wont let me post a pic instead of link, but meh
    http://i68.photobucket.com/albums/i2...asternBike.gif
    * Eastern or Go Home * EasternBikes.com * Eastern or Go Home *

  2. #2
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EasternJane View Post


    Good for front/rear hub bearings?
    Right now im using White Lithium grease, but it sucks after a week. Anyway, that grease shown above any better?
    Ah...there is no picture above. Are you intuiting that NO grease is better than the standard classic white lithium?

    You say WL is no good after a week? Please explain more in depth. All I can think of is that your WL grease got contaminated.

    EDIT - Yes you did fix the link. Thank you.
    Last edited by Panthers007; 01-26-09 at 06:24 PM. Reason: FI
    Quote Originally Posted by Cateye View Post
    Only panthers007 is stupid enough to believe that this is a good idea.

  3. #3
    Eastern or Go Home EasternJane's Avatar
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    The White Lithium seems clumpy and hard to pedal now. And the grease isnt contaminated...i dont think lol.
    http://i68.photobucket.com/albums/i2...asternBike.gif
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  4. #4
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    Why not use Phil (Wood) grease? It's a proven performer.

    The other one I use is waterproof marine grease. It looks a lot like Phil grease (transparent green, waterproof). The viscosity isn't ridiculously high like some wheel bearing greases and it's a lot less expensive in a small tub that will likely last you decades (or generations, or for the rest of your life - no, I'm not kidding).

  5. #5
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
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    I wouldn't recommend automotive grease. It is designed for high-pressure and high temperatures. I'm sure some is okay (I can hear the vultures circling), but it might fail being grease at low temperatures & pressure. I second you get some grease such as what Mike suggests above.

    I'll toss one other grease - Teflon-based bicycle grease. Pricey (less than Phil Wood), but it lasts a very long time without breaking down. One other thing to consider: When you change the grease in the bearings on a bicycle, always clean them thoroughly. Remove ALL the old grease using a solvent. Kerosene works. As will a can of Gumout from an automotive supply shop. Use these outdoors if possible. At least in a well cross-ventilates place. Avoid the fumes and wear gloves.
    Last edited by Panthers007; 01-26-09 at 07:55 PM. Reason: Oops...
    Quote Originally Posted by Cateye View Post
    Only panthers007 is stupid enough to believe that this is a good idea.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
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    Most any grease will work..
    You could probably use Crisco if you re-lubed frequently!

    Notice the headlines about all the wheels falling off cars in the Mid West because it was too cold!

  7. #7
    Senior Member z415's Avatar
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    I have used that Valvoline grease you linked and some high performance synthetic Valvoline. What you linked is indeed a bit thick. Will work and won't be detrimental to any of your parts, but definitely *feels* thick. OTOH, the high performance black stuff works great.

    Those two tubs will last me forever. In fact, I learned to use those cheaper automotive tubs from a LBS around here.
    Falling is learning...[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]...learn to not fall in a box.
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  8. #8
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    I think Mike is talking about this wonderful stuff, which only costs about $3 for a 1 lb tub at your local Home Depot (my local Lowe's only has the grease gun cartridge version).


  9. #9
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    Synthetic automotive grease is my number one pick as it performs as well or better than bike specific grease which is nothing more than re-packaged / re-branded automotive grease sold at a much higher price.

    If it works under high pressure / high temperature applications then it is more than what you need on a bicycle.

    Synthetic grease also performs very well at low temperatures which is important to me as I ride through the Canadian winter in temperatures that can get as cold as -40 .

  10. #10
    Senior Member EatMyA**'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
    Most any grease will work..
    You could probably use Crisco if you re-lubed frequently!

    Notice the headlines about all the wheels falling off cars in the Mid West because it was too cold!
    Man speaks truth

  11. #11
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    For some general info and a variety to choose from try www.mcmaster.com

    Link: http://www.mcmaster.com/#grease/=cb4kd

    I'm currently using Dow Corning Molykote G-0010 Multipurpose Synthetic Grease (http://www.mcmaster.com/#4328t74/=cb4xw) in a grease gun.

    If you can find what you're looking for at an auto parts store, it will most likely be cheaper than ordering. Marine grade grease and synthetic auto grease also work just fine. Regular maintenance will do more for your bike than any overpriced "bike" grease.

  12. #12
    Senior Member miamijim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Mills View Post
    Why not use Phil (Wood) grease? It's a proven performer.
    At the bottom of my prefered greases. If it sits too long the oils seperate out and Phil grease dries out and clumps if it isnt changed out very frequently. When I was in the buisness we ordered it by the case in those tubes you put into 'guns' so i have plenty of experience with it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Panthers007 View Post
    I wouldn't recommend automotive grease..
    Quote Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver View Post
    Synthetic automotive grease is my number one pick as it performs as well or better than bike specific grease which is nothing more than re-packaged / re-branded automotive grease sold at a much higher price.

    If it works under high pressure / high temperature applications then it is more than what you need on a bicycle.

    Synthetic grease also performs very well at low temperatures which is important to me as I ride through the Canadian winter in temperatures that can get as cold as -40 .
    I'm with Sixty Fiver.....I use red colored Mobil 1 synthetic grease. You can get a tub of it from Pep Boys for ~$12. Before the auto grease haters chime in with the usual high temp/hi pressure buisness I'll state that red Mobile 1 is a low viscoisty grease in compariosn to regular automotive wheel bearing grease.

    High temperature greases are needed in bicycle wheels. I couldnt count the number of bearing I've seen that have changed color due to heat.

    Dont drink the bicycle Kool Aide. Bicycles specific lubes and greases are the single biggest marketing rip offs ever.
    WWW.CYCLESPEUGEOT.COM 2005 Pinarello Dogma; 1991 Paramount PDG 70 Mtb; 1976? AD Vent Noir; 1989 LeMond Maillot Juane F&F; 1993? Basso GAP F&F; 1989 Terry Symmetry; 2003 Trek 4700 Mtb; 1983 Vitus 979

  13. #13
    Senior Member LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
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    I use the Valvoline Grease pictured above. With a plastic knife, I pack it into a Dualco grease gun with the long attachment for my greaseguard hubs.

    Works like a charm. It's red, just like Bullshot, but smells a little different. I got mine at the Dollar Tree, for.... a dollar.

    I haven't tried it in extreme cold, but the wheels, cranks, pedals and headset still turn at 20 degrees F.

    The tub has lasted me about 6 years so far.
    1980ish Free Spirit Sunbird fixed * 1996 Mongoose IBOC Zero-G * 1997 KHS Comp * 1990-ish Scapin * Olde Western Auto Cruiser.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Fissile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sixty Fiver View Post
    Synthetic automotive grease is my number one pick as it performs as well or better than bike specific grease which is nothing more than re-packaged / re-branded automotive grease sold at a much higher price.

    If it works under high pressure / high temperature applications then it is more than what you need on a bicycle.

    Synthetic grease also performs very well at low temperatures which is important to me as I ride through the Canadian winter in temperatures that can get as cold as -40 .
    Yup, bike specific grease is a huge rip-off. I've used boat trailer bearing grease -- water resistant -- for 2 decades now, and have never had any type of bearing failure. I paid something like $4 for a tube. One tube will take care of all my maintenance needs for 3 bikes for several years.
    Critical Mass

  15. #15
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
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    I've had some bad luck with automotive grease before. So I'd amend my opinion to: Ask around - and on this forum - if anyone has experience with a particular automotive (or aircraft, boat, flying-saucer...) grease you are thinking of. If people say it's fine, they've used it - go ahead.

    Happy Trails!
    Quote Originally Posted by Cateye View Post
    Only panthers007 is stupid enough to believe that this is a good idea.

  16. #16
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
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    Some VW constant-velocity joint grease some puddin'head used to grease my bearings with - and those of other people at a bike-shop. It turned into a hardened plastic and had to be pried and chiseled out of the hubs & BB.

    The going guess is that it was contaminated and it's surface-chemistry didn't like what is found in bicycle-bearings in ways of pressure/temperature. But the jury remains out. This happened back in the 1980's.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cateye View Post
    Only panthers007 is stupid enough to believe that this is a good idea.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Fissile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Panthers007 View Post
    Some VW constant-velocity joint grease some puddin'head used to grease my bearings with - and those of other people at a bike-shop. It turned into a hardened plastic and had to be pried and chiseled out of the hubs & BB.

    The going guess is that it was contaminated and it's surface-chemistry didn't like what is found in bicycle-bearings in ways of pressure/temperature. But the jury remains out. This happened back in the 1980's.
    CV joint grease should only be used for CV joints, not any type of wheel bearing -- automotive or otherwise. Like I've already said, I use marine type bearing grease on my bikes, have for years. No problems, and the stuff is a lot cheaper than bike specific grease.
    Critical Mass

  18. #18
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
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    Sounds good. And I like the price! I'll give it a shout when I run dry. Thank you.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cateye View Post
    Only panthers007 is stupid enough to believe that this is a good idea.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by miamijim View Post
    At the bottom of my prefered greases. If it sits too long the oils seperate out and Phil grease dries out and clumps if it isnt changed out very frequently. When I was in the buisness we ordered it by the case in those tubes you put into 'guns' so i have plenty of experience with it.





    I'm with Sixty Fiver.....I use red colored Mobil 1 synthetic grease. You can get a tub of it from Pep Boys for ~$12. Before the auto grease haters chime in with the usual high temp/hi pressure buisness I'll state that red Mobile 1 is a low viscoisty grease in compariosn to regular automotive wheel bearing grease.

    High temperature greases are needed in bicycle wheels. I couldnt count the number of bearing I've seen that have changed color due to heat.

    Dont drink the bicycle Kool Aide. Bicycles specific lubes and greases are the single biggest marketing rip offs ever.

    WOW!

    I've never had a separation problem with Phil grease or the less expensive waterproof Marine Grease. Almost any grease left in the sun to get hot will weep a bit.

    I've never seen or heard of the clumping, either.

    I've never seen wheel bearings that changed color from internal heating. I've seen cups and cones that still had some coloration from factory tempering.


    I think we all agree that bulk pack greases and oils are better than bicycle specific greases (if there were such a thing). The only reason to buy a bicycle-specific grease or oil might be to get a special applicator if it comes packaged that way. A needle-point oiler would be an example of a specialty package that's worth buying (at the right price).

  20. #20
    Senior Member StevePGN10's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by miamijim View Post
    I'm with Sixty Fiver.....I use red colored Mobil 1 synthetic grease. You can get a tub of it from Pep Boys for ~$12. Before the auto grease haters chime in with the usual high temp/hi pressure buisness I'll state that red Mobile 1 is a low viscoisty grease in compariosn to regular automotive wheel bearing grease.

    High temperature greases are needed in bicycle wheels. I couldnt count the number of bearing I've seen that have changed color due to heat.

    Dont drink the bicycle Kool Aide. Bicycles specific lubes and greases are the single biggest marketing rip offs ever.
    What a coincidence. I was just talking about this with a guy I ran into at lunchtime who is an engineer at DuPont for the business that makes Teflon lubricants. It started with a conversation about oiling clocks and got around to how great synthetic oil is and how it has become the favorite lubricant of all sorts of groups who are finicky about their lubricants. I asked him if he knew anything about the Teflon grease that DuPont launched just about the time they started sponsoring the Tour DuPont. He said it was a special product that they stopped the polymerization at a point where Teflon is a grease and not a solid, so it was all Teflon and not a grease with some Teflon in it. People who used it loved it, but not enough people bought it to keep the product on the market. He thinks Finish Line made it and licensed the DuPont brand.

    I told him the worst grease I ever used was some expensive Campagnolo grease that quickly became more of an adhesive. He said that also is a special grease that was aimed at professionals who routinely had their bikes stripped down, flushed, and regreased. Any extended use will find the stuff solidifying. He wrapped up the conversation by saying that synthetic greases are best, but marine grease is great and cheap, and anything listed as a bike grease will automatically have a premium on it.

    Regards,
    Steve - who will happily continue using the tub of marine grease on the shelf.
    Last edited by StevePGN10; 01-27-09 at 01:49 PM. Reason: fix typo

  21. #21
    Older than dirt CCrew's Avatar
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    I use Mobil1 Synthetic grease.

    -R

  22. #22
    Senior Member z415's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fissile View Post
    CV joint grease should only be used for CV joints, not any type of wheel bearing -- automotive or otherwise. Like I've already said, I use marine type bearing grease on my bikes, have for years. No problems, and the stuff is a lot cheaper than bike specific grease.
    Some of the automotive grease I've used list CV joints as an area it can be applied and it is good grease.
    Falling is learning...[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]...learn to not fall in a box.
    Any good American will watch THIS -and- WHERE WAS MY BIKE MADE?

  23. #23
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    My brother is a farmer and still uses the wagon that my late father bought new in 1960. That wagon has bearings tha have not always been "perfectly" adjusted, nor "perfectly" lubricated. He has used a variety of greases (including grease-gun grease), but usually "wheel bearing" grease of the kind available in a 1 pound (454 gr) tub.

    He has NEVER had a bearing failure - at least not yet ..... since 1960. That wagon has hauled LOTS of grain and with a "rack" has hauled 100+ alfalfa bales that were almost too heavy for a strong 18 yo to lift and throw upward 7 or 8 feet..... It was used like that for about 15 years then not used so "robustly" as the farm bought a 2-ton truck to haul the grain.

    The bottom line, IMHO, is to use whatever grease you have. After all, you are riding a bicycle and those wheel bearings are NOT stressed, relatively speaking. IF you want some ex-NASA bearing grease that cost Uncle Sam about $450 USD a tube, I have some and can sell you a tube for say $100 USD - but you have to pay shipping. Rest assured, if it WAS good enough for NASA, it will be good for your bicycle's bearings - no matter how heavy you are ;-) PM me if you are seriously interested and want your mind put at ease.... OTOH, you can just chill a bit with your favourite libation and ordinary wheel grease - but only after riding the bike and doing the necessary maintenance on it.

  24. #24
    Map maker cbchess's Avatar
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    I make my own grease using spit and dirt and a stick of butter.

  25. #25
    Senior Member AnthonyG's Avatar
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    I have a tub of automotive grease similar to that one that I bought back in the late 70's or early 80's and its still going strong. The grease I have is black and doesn't feel that thick. Its definitely not waxy and it doesn't dry out or clump together. Anyway its great grease for bicycle applications if a little messy. I've rebuilt bearings that I have previously greased and the grease was still performing well.

    Anthony

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