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Old 01-29-09, 01:06 AM   #1
thirdin77
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installing shimano external bearing cranksets to torque spec?

I want to install a Shimano external bearing crankset, the 5603 set, according to Shimano's instructions. I want to use a torque wrench to tighten the cups on each side of the bottom bracket which I understand I can do if I use Park Tool BBT-19. My problem is that I don't see how I can use Shimano TL-FC 16 given that there is no hex-shaped fitting on the back of the thing.

Shimano tells us to torque the thing to 0.7-1.5 N-m/6-13 in lbs but I don't see how anyone is supposed to torque it so precisely without a fitting for a torque wrench.
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Old 01-29-09, 01:10 AM   #2
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Oops, I just saw this.

Has anyone used it? Is it a durable tool? With some 305-435 in lbs of torque going through it, it had better be.

Another question, when I install the cups, do I torque both sides to spec or only the right side? Right side first, then left side?

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Old 01-29-09, 08:03 AM   #3
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Another question, when I install the cups, do I torque both sides to spec or only the right side? Right side first, then left side?
Both sides and it doesn't matter which is first. The cups don't touch each other so they aren't like a cartridge bb.
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Old 01-29-09, 08:21 AM   #4
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16" in Lbs is snug. Get your torque wrench and apply a small cresent wrench to the 3/8 drive end, and you will see how light the presure is for a 13 to 16 in Lbs torque.
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Old 01-29-09, 08:27 AM   #5
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Put some anti-seize on the threads (if they are new they should already have some) and tighten them down with a good amount of pressure, but don't go He-man on them. The external bearings are pretty idiot proof and torque shouldn't be all that much of an issue.


It is far more important to have the proper torque on the locking bolts on the crank arm because you can strip them out pretty bad and ruin the crank. I have seen it happen 2 times this past year.
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Old 01-29-09, 08:27 AM   #6
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Oops, I just saw this.

Has anyone used it? Is it a durable tool? With some 305-435 in lbs of torque going through it, it had better be.
Er...no. 435 inch pounds = 36.35 foot pounds = Not much at all.

It could be made out of plastic and if it's used properly would stand up for a long time.
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Old 01-29-09, 08:30 AM   #7
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BTW shimanos instructions are written by Engineers, while being very good most of the time, can be overly technical. 16lbs of tork is a Engineers way of saying, tighten down hard.
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Old 01-29-09, 09:17 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by thirdin77 View Post
Oops, I just saw this.

Has anyone used it? Is it a durable tool? With some 305-435 in lbs of torque going through it, it had better be.

Another question, when I install the cups, do I torque both sides to spec or only the right side? Right side first, then left side?
You are confusing apples and oranges.

BBT-19 is for torquing the bearing cups into the frame at 36 ft-lbs.

TL-FC 16 is for preloading the bearings before clamping the left crank arm onto the shaft. It serves exactly the same function as the bolt in the cap of a threadless headset which preloads the headset bearings before clamping the stem. Very little torque is needed.
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Old 01-29-09, 09:19 AM   #9
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Er...no. 435 inch pounds = 36.35 foot pounds = Not much at all.

It could be made out of plastic and if it's used properly would stand up for a long time.
On what planet???
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Old 01-29-09, 10:17 AM   #10
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You can use a fish scale to very accurately get 16 in-lbs. Attach the fish scale to the non business end of the tool. Measure the distance in inches from the center of the business end of the tool to the point of attachment of the fish scale. Now divide 16 in-lbs by the distance you measured above and that gives you the amount of pounds to pull on the fish scale to get the proper torque.
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Old 01-29-09, 11:15 AM   #11
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On what planet???
This one?
435in*lb|1 foot = 435/12 ft-lbf = 36.25 ft-lbf.
_______|12 in

edit: so he's off by 0.1 ft-lbf, he probably hit the 3 going for the 2.
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Old 01-29-09, 11:18 AM   #12
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BTW shimanos instructions are written by Engineers, while being very good most of the time, can be overly technical. 16lbs of tork is a Engineers way of saying, tighten down hard.
Yep, it's like when car manuals tell you what torque to put your spark plugs in with. It's the technical way to say "Snug, and just a tiny bit further."
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Old 01-29-09, 11:58 AM   #13
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This one?
435in*lb|1 foot = 435/12 ft-lbf = 36.25 ft-lbf.
_______|12 in

edit: so he's off by 0.1 ft-lbf, he probably hit the 3 going for the 2.
It wasn't the in-lb to ft-lb conversion that caused the question, it's the statement that 36 ft-lb isn't much torque. Get a torque wrench and tighten something to that value. See if you still think it isn't much.
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Old 01-29-09, 06:42 PM   #14
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It wasn't the in-lb to ft-lb conversion that caused the question, it's the statement that 36 ft-lb isn't much torque. Get a torque wrench and tighten something to that value. See if you still think it isn't much.
It's a lot for a tiny fastener, it's nothing for a large one. My torque wrench goes to ~140 ft-lbf and I run into stuff for which that isn't enough sometimes, although I will openly admit that 120 ft-lbf is a lot of torque. On the other hand, I'm not built like the T-rex road cyclist either.
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