Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Brooklyn NY
    Posts
    4,751
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Tubular cement, what else can be used?

    I have a small tube of Hutchinson tubular cement so I probably don't need anything else, but what other type of non-cycling specific cement can be used? Is it contact cement? In the old days we used to use FasTac from the auto supply stores, a trim cement. I would guess it would have to be able to hold well both to the tape and the rim, but also be removable with a certain amount of force so you could easily swap tires out on the road if necessary, and also maintain some tackiness so that the replacement would at least stay in place. I used Clement cement one time and it made such a mess I never used it again.

    I used contact cement on some veneer one time and I swore I'd never use that again either, but I didn't really know what I was doing. My next veneer job I used wood glue and that worked much better. No sign of the veneer coming off or forming bubbles or anything.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Oahu, HI
    My Bikes
    '94 DB Apex, '07 SBC Allez Elite
    Posts
    126
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Why do you want to use something else? Mixing is a bad idea...

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Brooklyn NY
    Posts
    4,751
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It a SMALL tube of cement that I have. Experience tells me I'll be needing this more than once.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Oahu, HI
    My Bikes
    '94 DB Apex, '07 SBC Allez Elite
    Posts
    126
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've seen some weird things happen when adhesives were mixed...
    You're in Brooklyn, should be easy to get more, no?
    I've used the Fas-tac and all of the bike glues, and other stuff might work fine but the point is do you wanna risk it?
    Glue is pretty cheap as it is.

  5. #5
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Appleton WI
    My Bikes
    Several, mostly not name brands.
    Posts
    12,648
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by zacster View Post
    I have a small tube of Hutchinson tubular cement so I probably don't need anything else, but what other type of non-cycling specific cement can be used? Is it contact cement? In the old days we used to use FasTac from the auto supply stores, a trim cement. I would guess it would have to be able to hold well both to the tape and the rim, but also be removable with a certain amount of force so you could easily swap tires out on the road if necessary, and also maintain some tackiness so that the replacement would at least stay in place. I used Clement cement one time and it made such a mess I never used it again.
    I use the Tufo rim tape. Much more pleasant than any of the glues I've used over the years. Works great, too.

  6. #6
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Saratoga, CA
    Posts
    11,495
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Fastak works great, but isn't something that works for spare tyres. It doesn't re-soften. And DO NOT use it on tyres or rims that have any traces of traditional glues. They do not stick to each other well and when you roll your tyre, you'll find a perfectly even layer of glue on the tube AND on the rim.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Sangetsu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    363
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The previous posters were right, you should use glue intended for use with tubular tires. With a little practice you should be able to mount your tires without making too much mess. They'll mount more easily if you stretch them first. I usually step on the inside of a deftlated tubular and pull the opposite side upward with both hands. Before applying the glue to the rims, I make sure they are absolutely clean. Acetone works best for removing old glue with a minimum of effort.

    The tube of glue you have is probably made to be used to install one tire. You should always have 2 or 3 tubes of glue on hand. Most bike shops should carry it, or they can order it for you if need be.

  8. #8
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Appleton WI
    My Bikes
    Several, mostly not name brands.
    Posts
    12,648
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sangetsu View Post
    The previous posters were right, you should use glue intended for use with tubular tires. With a little practice you should be able to mount your tires without making too much mess. They'll mount more easily if you stretch them first. I usually step on the inside of a deftlated tubular and pull the opposite side upward with both hands. Before applying the glue to the rims, I make sure they are absolutely clean. Acetone works best for removing old glue with a minimum of effort.

    The tube of glue you have is probably made to be used to install one tire. You should always have 2 or 3 tubes of glue on hand. Most bike shops should carry it, or they can order it for you if need be.
    A brass wire wheel works a treat for removing old glue. Less than a minute to do a rim -- no solvents or scrubbing needed.

    Before:



    After:



    Here's what I use, although a wire wheel on a Dremel would also work:


  9. #9
    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    West Village, New York City
    My Bikes
    too many
    Posts
    19,245
    Mentioned
    58 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I rode tubulars for recreational riding for years. I don't think I will ever again. What's the point?

  10. #10
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Saratoga, CA
    Posts
    11,495
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Tubies are for racing. Driving a Formulae-1 car at 50mph to the grocery store won't allow you to distinguish why it's different from an SUV.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Road Fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Ann Arbor, MI
    My Bikes
    Terraferma 650b, Mondonico SL and ELOS, Masi Gran Criterium, Trek 610, Breezer Liberty, Georgena Terry Classic
    Posts
    11,108
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Some of us cheapskates have bikes with tubulars and prefer to deal with and enjoy what we have rather than go changing to clinchers for no compelling reason.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    TORONTO , ONT , CA
    My Bikes
    '86 AMBROSI / C RECORD. PINARELLO MONTELLO / FRAME, FORK.
    Posts
    750
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "have bikes with tubulars and prefer to deal with and enjoy what we have rather than go changing to clinchers . . . " QUOTE.


    What are "clincher tires"?
    (LOL)


    Regards,
    J T

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Brooklyn NY
    Posts
    4,751
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Seeing the ads that pop up on this page make me glad I turned off ads.doubleclick.net on my home computer. I see woodworking ads and ads for flights to India. Woodworking because in the text of my message I mentioned veneer, flights to India because I went there a few months ago.

    That's scary. Go to your hosts file and block doubleclick.net! Don't let them track your movements. Your surfing will be faster too.

  14. #14
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Appleton WI
    My Bikes
    Several, mostly not name brands.
    Posts
    12,648
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by zacster View Post
    Seeing the ads that pop up on this page make me glad I turned off ads.doubleclick.net on my home computer. I see woodworking ads and ads for flights to India. Woodworking because in the text of my message I mentioned veneer, flights to India because I went there a few months ago.

    That's scary. Go to your hosts file and block doubleclick.net! Don't let them track your movements. Your surfing will be faster too.
    There are ads on this page?

    I don't see any except the "support our sponsors" text block (using Firefox with AdBlock and NoScript).

  15. #15
    Senior Member due ruote's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    4,307
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Sangetsu View Post
    I usually step on the inside of a deftlated tubular and pull the opposite side upward with both hands.
    Another method is to mount the tire without glue, inflate, leave for a couple days, then remove and glue up.

    fwiw, I've never worried about getting every bit of old glue off the rim, and I've never rolled a tire. Then again, I'm a rec. rider so I'm not cornering hard in a pack or anything. The wire wheel idea seems pretty good - I'd avoid any solvents that will remove tire glue unless you have a rated respirator.

  16. #16
    Light Makes Right GV27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Green Mountain, Colorado
    My Bikes
    Gianni Motta Criterium, Dean Hardtail
    Posts
    1,521
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by noglider View Post
    I rode tubulars for recreational riding for years. I don't think I will ever again. What's the point?
    I have a classic bike. Always has had tubulars, always will.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Brooklyn NY
    Posts
    4,751
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Same here with the classic bike. That's the only reason I'm even attempting this again. They were a lot more trouble than they'd be worth now. The current clinchers ride much better than the old ones we rode back in the '80s. The alternative back then was tubulars.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •