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  1. #1
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    Locknut on rear hub axle loose

    Hey I'm first time poster and have a question. I have 07 stumpjumper and took the cassette off today to clean. I noticed the locknut on the cassette side was loose enough that I could turn with my finger. I tightened it up so there was no play (still with my finger) and put everything together again on bike. Is this alright or should I adjust a different way? Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
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    You should adjust the hub using a cone wrench and a box-wrench of the correct size for the locknut. I'd also suggest doing an overhaul of the hub. Especially as you've been riding it loose. Disassemble the hub, clean out old grease, and replace the ball-bearings - 1/4" no doubt. Fresh grease and reassemble and adjust.
    How do you keep an idiot in suspense?

  3. #3
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
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    Also something to be aware of is-
    IF the axle is a QR type, you'll actually compress the axle slightly when you tighten the QR.
    You have to set the cones slightly loose to allow for this.
    It'll take a little trial & error to get "the touch".

  4. #4
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    I agree with Panther. If your lock nut was that loose you need to overhaul the hub.

    When I overhaul one I always tighten the drive side locknut against the cone first so that I can be sure to get them nice and tight so it'll never come loose. Then I do the final preload adjustment on the non-drive side.

  5. #5
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    How much to get a shop to do it?

  6. #6
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
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    Depends on where you are. Different locations charge varying sums. Anywhere from $10 - $25. But it's a good skill to learn. This will help you decide if it's beyond your realms of expertise:

    http://bicycletutor.com/overhaul-wheel-bearings/
    How do you keep an idiot in suspense?

  7. #7
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    Thanks for your replies. I am a mechanical person, but I think I will let the shop do it and watch them. They are cool and don't mind if I hang out and watch. Maybe next time they need it I will be able to tackle it. Thanks again

  8. #8
    Senior Member bigvegan's Avatar
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    If it were my bike, I'd tighten it down and ride it, and I'm a bit obsessive about safe riding.

    I'd be surprised if it only cost you $25 to have the hub rebuilt, and rebuilding a hub because the locknut was slightly loose seems a little excessive.

    How does it feel? Is there play in the cassette? Does anything feel unstable?

    If yes, then have the hub rebuilt, but if not, if it feels fine, tighten that nut and ride on. You're on a fairly new bike and Shimano hubs are pretty durable. (From the mountainbikerides link below, "Shimano freehubs can be serviced but you can no longer buy spares or tools..." If the company doesn't even recommend you service them, I think a loose nut is not something to be overly concerned with here.)

    Even the bike maintenance charts only suggest "inspecting" the hubs every 6,000 miles.

    http://bicycleswest.com/page.cfm?PageID=136

    Here's the whole rebuild process if you think it's worth it:

    http://www.mountainbikerides.co.uk/f...himano_hub.htm

    I'd definitely watch the shop do the repair though, as I think there are a lot of shops that would tighten that bolt, wait a day, and tell you to pick it up, knowing nobody would ever know the difference.

  9. #9
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
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    I overhaul my hubs every year. Takes very little time, and my wheels roll straight and true. I don't know what you're reading - but you'd better throw it out!

    By the way, there is a big difference between the freehub and the hub itself.
    How do you keep an idiot in suspense?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigvegan View Post
    ... "Shimano freehubs can be serviced but you can no longer buy spares or tools..."
    It's no biggie. They still use stock ball bearing sizes and the tool needed to open them can be made from a cut down cone wrench, a file ground to fit, or any stiffer-than-average piece of ~2 mm steel. If you need to replace the pawls, their retaining ring or the seal you're obviously stuck w/o spare parts. But the most common failure is simply grime build up or water intrusion.

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