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Thread: wheel building

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    wheel building

    tried to search and came up with nothing useful. Which probably means I'm inept at searching. Any whoo, I'm very frustrated with my rear wheel. To start I built my bike about 6 years ago. I laced the wheels and all. They were my first set to lace from scratch. I was impressed that the rear lasted my 6 years before I had to replace it due to a flat spot. I replaced both front and rear with matching ambrosio nojo rims I was able to get a super deal on. With in 5 miles of riding I have a flat spot and the pinned seam has expanded considerably. I used the same spokes and nipples for the second time building these wheels. Would that have anything to do with my troubles? Since I've built the wheel I've heard you should replace your spokes and nipples every time you build a new wheel. Is this true?
    Any suggestions for a good rear wheel for a hard tail mountain bike with rim brakes?

  2. #2
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
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    Yes you definitely should use new spokes & nipples. And a new rim most likely. Some hubs are worthy of salvaging for re-use if they are structurally sound.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cateye View Post
    Only panthers007 is stupid enough to believe that this is a good idea.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. dolphin View Post
    ..I replaced both front and rear with matching ambrosio nojo rims .. With in 5 miles of riding I have a flat spot and the pinned seam has expanded considerably. I used the same spokes and nipples for the second time building these wheels. Would that have anything to do with my troubles?
    No.
    Premature spoke breakage and wind-up are the kind of issues that could come from reusing old spokes + nipples. Expanding seam might be influenced by lacing pattern. Flat spot is either manufacturing defect, pothole impact or excessive spoke tension.

    Quote Originally Posted by mr. dolphin View Post
    ..Since I've built the wheel I've heard you should replace your spokes and nipples every time you build a new wheel. Is this true?
    Not really, or possibly for a given value of "true".
    Nipples are usually replaced 'cause they are cheap and new ones spin on so much nicer.
    New spokes also makes the build more pleasant and if you're trying to be rational the fastest way to get the old ones out is to cut them out of the wheel.
    If speed of assembly isn't a big issue spokes are often replaced because for a rear wheel it's hard to know how much life they have left in them and considering the build time new ones (usually) doesn't seem that expensive.

    Another HUGE reason for replacing spokes is that unless replacing a rim with a new one of the same make & model, few people take the time to track down a replacement rim with the same ERD.

    Quote Originally Posted by mr. dolphin View Post
    ..Any suggestions for a good rear wheel for a hard tail mountain bike with rim brakes?
    My current favourites are Mavic Ceramic and Ritchey Girder.

  4. #4
    Senior Member bikeman715's Avatar
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    the rule of thumb here is to replace your spokes with new ones when you rebuild your wheel because the spokes become worn over time from use, and they may not seat right in the hub. if it was me I would use 2 mm gouges spokes which would be stronger to take the beating from hard tailing.

  5. #5
    Senior Member parcoju's Avatar
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    Spokes aren't that expensive, why not get new ones?
    Unless you just want to practice wheelbuilding, and if you don't intend to ride on these wheels.

  6. #6
    slowest! dsellinger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by parcoju View Post
    Spokes aren't that expensive, why not get new ones?
    Unless you just want to practice wheelbuilding, and if you don't intend to ride on these wheels.
    um, count again? If he got a smokin deal on the rims, then spokes would probably cost more then he paid for the rims.
    figure 2x36 spokes and a $1 a spoke from an lbs so thats $70 before tax. You can get em cheaper online, but then they are selling them in packs of 20 or 50 and none of those work out to 36 very well, plus you will prob need diff lengths for the front wheels and for the drive/non drive side on the back. So 2 20 packs plus a 50 or 2 more 20's for the front... so $35 for the 50, $15 each for the 20's, plus $10 shipping and your at $75 for little metal wires. ramble ramble...

    I say spokes are the hidden cost in wheel building and I would reuse if possible, replace the one or 2 that are in bad shape.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikeman715 View Post
    ... the spokes become worn over time from use, .
    In the most common configuration, SS spoke against aluminum hub flanges it's no contest - I've never seen a spoke worn at the elbow. At the outer cross - sure, but never at the elbow. They may fatigue, but there's no way of identifying that with the naked eye.

    Quote Originally Posted by bikeman715 View Post
    ... if it was me I would use 2 mm gouges spokes which would be stronger to take the beating from hard tailing.
    That is a very questionable piece of advice.

    Thicker spokes may offer some protection against tacoing, at the increased risk of cracking the rim. Thinner spokes OTOH offer better durability for everyday riding.

  8. #8
    Senior Member EatMyA**'s Avatar
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    You can use the same spokes and nipples (I just dont like using the same nipples, for the reasons "dabac" stated).

    You're gonna need at least a few new spokes though. Maybe not many, but some. I have never seen ALL the spokes of a used wheel come out intact.

    If you reuse your hub try adding spoke washers, because most likely it will have grooves worn into the holes.

    GOOD LUCK!

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