Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    50/50 Road/eBike Commuter kmcrawford111's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Valparaiso, IN
    My Bikes
    Specialized Roubaix, Electrified Swobo Dixon, Brompton
    Posts
    758
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Changing Chainrings together with Chain and Freehubs/Freewheels - General Rule?

    I recently changed a chain and freehub and I got to thinking - when should I change the chainrings? I have read here that the chainrings will outlast the freehubs/wheels, but by how much? I would think it would be best, for wearing purposes, to change the chainrings at the same as changing the chain and freehub/wheel, so is there some general rule as the following:

    "Change the chainring every xth time you change a chain and freehub/freewheel"

    It would seem following this rule would be a good practice. So if such a practice exists, what is the value of "x"? Does it depend on the type of bike and the type of riding?

    Many thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Reston, VA
    My Bikes
    2003 Giant OCR2
    Posts
    2,369
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It'll depend on the material the chainrings are made out of for sure. Steel will last longer than lighter things.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    4,383
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by kmcrawford111 View Post
    I recently changed a chain and freehub and I got to thinking - when should I change the chainrings? ..is there some general rule as the following:

    "Change the chainring every xth time you change a chain and freehub/freewheel"
    Well, it would depend very much on personal experiences, but I seem to get abt 3 sets of chain/cassettes before I need to replace the chain wheels.

    Quote Originally Posted by kmcrawford111 View Post
    .. what is the value of "x"? Does it depend on the type of bike and the type of riding?
    It does, but it also depends on how long you run the chains/cassettes before you replace them. Some roadies are able to keep their chainwheels for ages, while others, particularly MTBers swap the whole drive line every time.

  4. #4
    me have long head tube TallRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    4,097
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In a word, No.

    Chainrings rarely have to be replaced. If you replace your chain at reasonable enough intervals, depending on its wear, you'll probably never need to replace the chainrings. Only reason to replace the rings is if the new chain skips on the chainring teeth.

    Chainrings have more teeth to engage the chain at a given time, and since they have more teeth than a rear sprocket, the angle of difference between teeth is much less also.
    Steel chainrings are virtually indestructible, but aluminum chainrings rarely wear out if the bike is cared for properly.

    There are instances where chainring teeth get worn out, like on my brother's bike where he rode over 10,000 miles without ever changing his chain and probably not cleaning or lubing it as often as he should have either. Just ridiculous.

    Last edited by TallRider; 02-19-09 at 01:08 PM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    26,149
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Tim's illustration is an extreme example of what neglect and abuse can do but is hardly typical. I've had chainrings last over 30,000 miles and they never looked anywhere near that bad and that's with chain changes at 5000-6000 mile intervals.

    My son-in-law managed to wear out a 52T Shimano chainring but it took him 25,000 miles to do it and he is a racer and stronger than almost any other rider I know.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Loveland, CO
    My Bikes
    Two LOOK 585s, one KG461
    Posts
    4,987
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The picture above would be an example of the type of wear produced by an extremely elongated chain. As the chain pitch gets longer, the chain rides higher up on the teeth. With normal wear, the teeth do get noticeably pointed in shape.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •