Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 02-19-09, 02:41 PM   #1
courtesi
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Bikes:
Posts: 58
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Recommendations on a bullet proof wide 1x5 or 1x6 setup?

Basically I need gears but I want as few as possible. I prefer to keep a derailer setup as opposed to that of internal gear hubs.

The situation I am looking at is (PLEASE correct me if I am wrong) most of the 1x5/1x6 groups are mostly for basic beginners on bikes. What I'm looking at is a 1x5/1x6 set up that is wide and would be very extremely durable. Weight is NOT a concern. Durability and as few gears as possible is.

Any help would be appreciated.

[edit] I think I would be also open to 1x7 solutions.

Last edited by courtesi; 02-19-09 at 02:47 PM.
courtesi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-09, 03:40 PM   #2
blamp28
Bikaholic
 
blamp28's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Western, Michigan
Bikes: Trek Fuel 90, Giant OCR, Rans Screamer Tandem
Posts: 1,465
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
8 and 9 speed stuff is more mainstream and readily available but you can find seven speed cassettes as well. I would just look for a deal on and 8 speed chain/Cassette combo. Get an Acera derailleur and shifter - durable and cheap.
blamp28 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-09, 03:58 PM   #3
Little Darwin
The Improbable Bulk
 
Little Darwin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Wilkes-Barre, PA
Bikes: Many
Posts: 8,401
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
There is no real increase in complexity between a 1x5 and a 1x9 so, I would suggest looking at 1x8 or 1x9 simply so that you can use a cassette instead of a freewheel, and use more modern components.

Even if you go with a 1x8, and ignore the smallest gear, you would probably end up with a higher level of component, and be happier with the result.

To get the widest range of gears, just look for a cassette that has the largest and smallest cogs, and a rear derailleur that is rated to handle that range... then pick a chain ring to give you the gear range you need. This is personal taste, but I would choose based on what gives you a low enough gear for the riding you need to do. The highest gear will get you up to a certain speed, then if you are going down hill, you simply coast when you get above that speed.

You can do a 1x7 using a cassette if 7 is really as high as you are willing to go by using a spacer, so that is as low as I would suggest. But, I really see no reason to go with 7 when 8 is just as easy to build, and it may be difficult to find a reasonable quality shifter for a 7 speed configuration.
Little Darwin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-09, 04:17 PM   #4
AndrewP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Montreal
Bikes: Peugeot Hybrid, Minelli Hybrid
Posts: 6,521
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
For a durable wheel you need a freehub rather than a freewheel. To even the spoke tension minimise wheel dish by using a 7 sp freehub with spacers on the NDS.
AndrewP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-09, 05:08 PM   #5
AnthonyG
Senior Member
 
AnthonyG's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Queanbeyan, Australia.
Bikes:
Posts: 3,686
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 71 Post(s)
My beater bike is a has a basic 6 speed freewheel although I'm running a triple front chainring as well. It works fine although there are a few things to consider. The only 6 speed freewheel I've seen are 14-28 and in some rare cases you may be able to find 14-24. That's it. Thats your choices. A hub for 6 speed will also be spaced for 126mm rather than 130mm. If you have 130mm rear spacing I would recommend looking at 8 speed. They were pretty durable.

The dish on my 126mm spaced, 6 speed freewheel isn't perfect but its better than on my 130mm spaced, 9 speed road bike.

Anthony
AnthonyG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-09, 05:22 PM   #6
fuzz2050
Real Men Ride Ordinaries
 
fuzz2050's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 3,701
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
LX level cassette hub, with 3 cogs (34, 18, 12, hows that range?) and a lot of spacers. Build it to a rim with off centered spoke holes to minimize dish.
fuzz2050 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-09, 05:57 PM   #7
operator
cab horn
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Toronto
Bikes: 1987 Bianchi Campione
Posts: 28,306
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by courtesi View Post
Basically I need gears but I want as few as possible. I prefer to keep a derailer setup as opposed to that of internal gear hubs.

The situation I am looking at is (PLEASE correct me if I am wrong) most of the 1x5/1x6 groups are mostly for basic beginners on bikes. What I'm looking at is a 1x5/1x6 set up that is wide and would be very extremely durable. Weight is NOT a concern. Durability and as few gears as possible is.

Any help would be appreciated.

[edit] I think I would be also open to 1x7 solutions.
Well few gears as possible is 1x1. And 7 is a long way off from 1 I have to admit. A "durable" setup would mean either 1 x 1 or at the very least 1x7. That would mean cassette hub with fewest gear possible. Drivetrain last longer, replacement parts are cheap.
operator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-09, 08:35 PM   #8
LarDasse74
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Grid Reference, SK
Bikes: I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.
Posts: 3,769
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
As others have said, the most durable multi-speed wheels are based around a cassette style hub, and almost all of those are now designed for 8, 9, or 10 speeds.

However, you can disassemble most cassettes and use only the gears you want - buy a 12 - 34 and make yourself a four speed cassette 12 - 18 - 26 - 34, then fill the rest of the freehub body with spacers. This will probably work best with a friction shifter, too, as rear cogs have ramps and gates built into the teeth to allow indexed shifters to work, and switching cogs around messes up the ramp/gate pattern.

This strategy could also allow you to keep your chainline as straight as possible if you space the cassette right, then you can put a single chainring on the front where a middle chainring would normally go. You can also put a nice big bash ring or chain guard in the big chainring spot.
LarDasse74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:14 PM.