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  1. #1
    Senior Member A.Winthrop's Avatar
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    Shimano UG & HG chain replacement pins - Interchangeable?

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    Last edited by A.Winthrop; 09-10-10 at 05:01 AM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member bikeman715's Avatar
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    i believe they will work for you. if i remember right the UG did not use a replace pin but the pin itself would be use to break the chain and reconnect it.

  3. #3
    Insane Bicycle Mechanic Jeff Wills's Avatar
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    Uniglide (UG) chains never had seperate pins. Shimano introduced the replace-a-pin method method of breaking and reattaching chains a year after they introduced the Hyperglide (HG) cogs. Interactive Glide (IG) came later. IG and HG used the same pins, but there's different pins for 7/8-speed, 9-speed, and 10-speed chains.

    To break a Uniglide chain, you push the pin almost all the way out but leave it hanging in the opposite plate. The chain should come apart. When you put it back on, you reattach it by pushing the pin back through. This takes practice and three hands- it's good to try it out on a workstand before you have to do it in the field.
    Jeff Wills

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  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Wills View Post
    To break a Uniglide chain, you push the pin almost all the way out but leave it hanging in the opposite plate. The chain should come apart. When you put it back on, you reattach it by pushing the pin back through. This takes practice and three hands- it's good to try it out on a workstand before you have to do it in the field.
    A memory from the past! I haven't repaired a chain like that in years.

    Actually, if you push the pin out just right, you will leave a short (<1 mm) stub still sticking into the inner part of the sideplate and it will take a slight twist or bend to take the chain apart at that point. When you go to reinstall the chain, the stub will "snap" into the opposite end of the chain and hold it in place while you center the chain tool and drive the pin all the way in. That eliminates the need for three hands.

  5. #5
    Insane Bicycle Mechanic Jeff Wills's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    That eliminates the need for three hands.
    Sez you! Yeah, I was trying to keep my post short. I haven't repaired a chain like that for a long time, either. Nowadays I use SRAM master links. My hands get just as greasy, but it's less frustrating.
    Jeff Wills

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  6. #6
    Senior Member bikeman715's Avatar
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    yes to your question , it will be easier on both accounts.

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