Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-30-09, 10:40 AM   #1
seagullplayer
Star of the Nursing Home
Thread Starter
 
seagullplayer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Southern Indiana
Bikes: Schwinn, Mirada
Posts: 189
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
glueless patch

I got this "glueless" tire patch kit, are these things any good? The kit didn't have any sandpaper in it only one of those roughing disks, thought I would toss in a piece of sandpaper, but will these patches hold?

Thanks
seagullplayer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-09, 10:45 AM   #2
TSUTexan93
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Texas
Bikes: Trek / CCM
Posts: 128
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've used the Slime patches and the Park Tool patches. The Parks are better in my opinion. They are convenient in a jam and will get you a few miles down the road, but that's it. Be sure and rough up the tube with the sandpaper. It makes a difference. My experience is about an hour or two at best for glueless patches.
TSUTexan93 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-09, 10:51 AM   #3
simongrant
Senior Member
 
simongrant's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 79
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i tried glueless patches a while ago and they were pretty awful,though this could it could have just been the kit i had.I went through 4-5 patches for one repair as i could not get them to stick,again this could possibly be bad technique on my part but i can patch with tradtional glue patches no probs

Simon
simongrant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-09, 10:58 AM   #4
kayakdiver
ah.... sure.
 
kayakdiver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Whidbey Island WA
Bikes: Specialized.... schwinn..... enough to fill my needs..
Posts: 4,107
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
temporary yes....... permanent no... like said above. Using glue is pretty simple so I never bother with the stick on type.

best system for me is a spare tube. replace leaking one with new tube. when you get home pull out the glue and fix. this now becomes my spare tube/repeat.
kayakdiver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-09, 11:17 AM   #5
DannoXYZ 
Senior Member
 
DannoXYZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Saratoga, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 11,606
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Glueless patches (misnomer really) are fine to get you home. But you really need to peel them off later and use a regular patch with vulcanizing fluid to do a permanent repair. You'll find that it's impossible to peel off a regular patch that's been applied with vulcanizing fluid; it's fused to the tube.
DannoXYZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-09, 11:20 AM   #6
blamp28
Bikaholic
 
blamp28's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Western, Michigan
Bikes: Trek Fuel 90, Giant OCR, Rans Screamer Tandem
Posts: 1,465
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've used them a few times to get home if I flatted on a long ride but I always do a real repair or replace the tube when I have time. I just like the quick repair while on the road/trail. That said, I have forgotten and waited a month or more before getting to the real repair and they have held just fine.
blamp28 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-09, 12:30 PM   #7
HillRider 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Bikes: '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
Posts: 29,117
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 179 Post(s)
The first generation Park GP-1 patches were notoriously unreliable and gave the whole idea a bad name. The later GP-2 are supposed to be better but I never tried them after my first experience with the GP-1's.

I carry a spare tube (or two), change the tube on the road and repair the leaking tube at home. One problem with on-the-road repairs is finding the hole in the bad tube. The leak is often so small as to be undetectable unless you use floor pump to really inflate the tube firmly. Sometimes I even need a bucket of water to detect the bubbles. A frame or mini-pump won't do it.
HillRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-09, 01:27 PM   #8
DannoXYZ 
Senior Member
 
DannoXYZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Saratoga, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 11,606
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
One of the problems with the glueless patches is they have an adhesive that's heat-sensitive. I've had one come apart at the most unfortunate time while bombing down a mountain at 50mph+. The heat generated by the brakes can heat up the tube to about 150-F; well within operating-range of the tyre & rim. But the adhesive on the glueless patches will soften and the scuffing between the tube and tyre can squirm the patch off.
DannoXYZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-09, 03:02 PM   #9
adaminlc
Senior Member
 
adaminlc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Las Cruces, NM
Bikes: 2007 Surly Cross Check, 199? Novara Alpine
Posts: 328
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I found them useful on my bike running 32's and about 65 PSI. On my 25's, however, running about 100 PSI, they are useless. I have had the slime brand patches last for months on the lower PSI tubes, but they fail very quickly at higher PSI.
adaminlc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-09, 05:45 PM   #10
Makeitso
Desert Rat
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: SoCal Desert Cities
Bikes: GT Timberline (1990?), Trek 1100 (199?), Giant OCR3 (2007)
Posts: 366
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have the Slime glueless patches on my tube. Some of the patches have been on for months and are still holding. The air pressure in these tires is up to 125 on one of the bikes. I have had no problems with them holding so far. I live in an area that is hotter than most. It gets up to 115 or 120 in the shade so the pavement can fry eggs. I don't know how hot the tires and tubes get but I've had no problems so far.
Makeitso is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-09, 06:36 PM   #11
calyth
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ottawa, ON, Canada
Bikes:
Posts: 406
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've found that they, like emergency tireboots, may be tricky to patch because the adhesive doesn't seem to be as sticky as they could be.

If you can keep it clean, and keep the patch in place, and inflate it, the pressure should help with the patch keep everything in check.

But like others have said, replace it with vulcanizing patches when you get home. Those last a lot longer.
calyth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-09, 11:26 PM   #12
CMC SanDiego 
Senior Member
 
CMC SanDiego's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Diego
Bikes: Ti Mongoose Pro-Cipressa w/DA, Giordana-XL Strada, Eddy Merckx OS Strada, Ti DBR-Mtn (hardtail), Fuji-Touring Series V, Raleigh SuperCourse X-tracycle, Burley Tandem
Posts: 721
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Unlike others here, I'm real happy using the Park glueless patches (I currently have one on each front and rear) and after 4 months neither has given out. Since I always carry a spare tube, regular patch kit, and a pump, I figure I'll keep riding them until I have a problem and see how long they last. My kit did come with a small piece of sandpaper and I used it to make sure that I roughed the area up very well (one of the patches was even on a seam). I'm sure the vulcanizing patches are better, but I can't complain about what my $2 trial with the Park glueless patches have given me.
CMC SanDiego is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-09, 12:10 AM   #13
DaJMasta
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Austin, TX
Bikes: Giant XTC Team Custom XC bike, Nashbar tourer custom commuter
Posts: 208
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Is this really a tire patch or is it for the tube? Glueless tube patches in my experience are great, they're cheap, light, and easy to apply, and they do a good job of patching for the life of the tube on small leaks. Tire patches are an entirely different animal, and I wouldn't go with a glueless. You don't want to compromise the tire because of the barrier it serves for the tube, so while a boot or something similar will work for a temporary fix, it's best to try some of the aforementioned more permanent fix methods.

This is the kind I use which have lasted a year or more after the fix and are very simple to use, but they are tube patches:
http://www.parktool.com/products/det...t=17&item=GP-2
DaJMasta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-09, 12:19 AM   #14
Wordbiker
Pwnerer
 
Wordbiker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Pagosa Springs, CO, USA
Bikes: Road, MTB, Cruiser, Chopper, BMX
Posts: 2,907
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Better question: Why are they called 'glueless' patches when they have glue on them? Is the right terminology 'adhesive' and conventional chemical vulcanizing patches should be called 'adhesiveless'?
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by ahsposo View Post
Ski, bike and wish I was gay.
Wordbiker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-09, 04:50 AM   #15
Thulsadoom
Senior Member
 
Thulsadoom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Gouverneur NY
Bikes: 2003 BIANCHI VIGORELLI, 2002 TREK 520, Schwinn Mesa WINTER BIKE
Posts: 1,257
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm always amazed when I read one of these threads. I've used those glueless patches (both Park and Slime) many times and had very little trouble with them. I never replace them when I get home, and I've had many of them last for a long time. I find that as long as you get it on there in dry weather, and take care when you put the tube back in the tire and re-inflate, it lasts as long as any other patch. Maybe I'm just lucky with them.......
Thulsadoom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-09, 08:42 AM   #16
jdott
100% car free
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Salt Lake City
Bikes: 2008 LeMond Tete de Course
Posts: 218
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I carry a couple in case I get a third flat on a ride. I'm sure they work more for most applications, but I'd definitely re-patch as soon as possible because there's no reason to take any more risks on high speed descents.
jdott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-09, 12:40 PM   #17
bicycleflyer
747 Freight Pilot
 
bicycleflyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Ohio, USA
Bikes: Rivendell, Bike-Friday Pocket-Rocket and one home made fixed gear
Posts: 458
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The original GP-1 from Park were notoriously unreliable and even Park eventually came out claimed they were temporary. Then the GP-2s were introduced and Park no longer makes the temporary claim. The one tire I did use GP-2 on lasted a long while. I think one precaution all the glueless patch instructions make is to not inflate until the tube is installed in the tire.

My feelings are mixed over the use of GP2 as a stand alone patch kit. I want to trust it because I really like the idea of no tube of glue and the kit is really compact. But my bad experience with the GP1 prevents me from fully trusting them yet. Besides, I rarely flat. Maybe one or two a year and I don't think I have had two flats on one ride in almost 5 years. So I may just make this the year I go ahead and leave the vulcanizing kit at home and carry only the GP2 kit.

While my feelings are mixed over glueless patches, what has saved my butt on four different occasions has been Park's glueless tire boot. Yes, I could not inflate much beyond 70 psi. Yes, I had a noticable thump, thump, thump as I rode home. NO, they are not as good as a section of cut out tire. But that was way better than pushing the bike home. The longest I rode one of these was 20 miles on a pea gravel type bike trail. The longest I ever rode one on asphalt was 12 miles.
bicycleflyer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-09, 12:44 PM   #18
Chop61
Senior Member
 
Chop61's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Atlanta, GA
Bikes: Pinarello Road, Surly LHT, Dolan Track, Fuji Supreme, Guru Ti Tri, Bamboo
Posts: 231
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Absolutly useless in areas of heat and high humidity. Like say, Louisiana.
Chop61 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-09, 12:48 PM   #19
StanSeven
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Delaware shore
Bikes: Cervelo C3, Guru Photon, Waterford, Specialized CX
Posts: 12,000
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 162 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wordbiker View Post
Better question: Why are they called 'glueless' patches when they have glue on them? Is the right terminology 'adhesive' and conventional chemical vulcanizing patches should be called 'adhesiveless'?
It means you stick them on without having to apply glue from a seperate tube
StanSeven is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-09, 01:34 PM   #20
ryanwood
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Eastern Iowa
Bikes: surly cross check
Posts: 502
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have had absolutely great luck with park's glueless patches. I am currently running 2 of them on my rear tire at 70 psi. I do admit that I don't fully trust them so I generally keep a spare tube with me on my commute anyway, but the patches are certainly cheaper than replacing a tube every time I get a flat and quicker than a full on patch
ryanwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-09, 02:31 PM   #21
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Bikes: too many
Posts: 28,046
Mentioned: 57 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 726 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wordbiker View Post
Better question: Why are they called 'glueless' patches when they have glue on them? Is the right terminology 'adhesive' and conventional chemical vulcanizing patches should be called 'adhesiveless'?
Good point. And clipless pedals clip in, so they should be called clipfull. Or maybe clippy pedals. Whatever. But not clipless. Toe clips don't clip, either.
__________________
Tom Reingold, noglider@pobox.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:39 AM.