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  1. #1
    Senior Member rdtompki's Avatar
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    Grease on Threads?

    The manual that came with my tandem recommends putting grease on bolt threads before reattaching stems, etc. I find this strange since for larger bolts in automotive-class applications grease is specifically not recommended due to a tendency to exceed the recommended torque. Are we talking the case of a steel bolt and aluminum threads (the typically bicycle situation)? If so wouldn't some other sort of anti-seize compound be preferred?
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  2. #2
    My bike's better than me! neil0502's Avatar
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    ParkTool's pages on torque and fasteners. May be generally helpful, here....

    http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=88

    AND

    http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=89

    AND

    http://www.sacskyranch.com/antiseize.htm

    I think you can rarely go wrong using anti-seize ... particularly in a dissimilar metals situation like you describe.

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    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    +1 Anti Seize is a must whenever you have dissimilar metals.

  4. #4
    You gonna eat that? Doohickie's Avatar
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    Anti-seize is the reason for putting grease on the threads.
    I stop for people / whose right of way I honor / but not for no one.



    Originally Posted by bragi "However, it's never a good idea to overgeneralize."

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    Map maker cbchess's Avatar
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    I put grease on every metal to metal connection on my bike -so yes every bolt.

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    Senior Member SJX426's Avatar
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  7. #7
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdtompki View Post
    The manual that came with my tandem recommends putting grease on bolt threads before reattaching stems, etc. I find this strange since for larger bolts in automotive-class applications grease is specifically not recommended due to a tendency to exceed the recommended torque. Are we talking the case of a steel bolt and aluminum threads (the typically bicycle situation)? If so wouldn't some other sort of anti-seize compound be preferred?
    Where did you get that? Torque is bolt-tension and torque-specs are given assuming machine-oil is used on the threads. This prevents thread-friction from contributing to the resistance on the torque-wrench. You want to be able to read true bolt-tension, not friction in the threads. The highest-tensions used in cars tend to be head studs, wheel and spindle nuts. Oil is always used on those threads before torquing to spec (grease or anti-seize also lubricates and prevents excessive friction in the threads, especially the larger bolts with higher tensions).

    Check out this info sheet from one of the largest manufacturers of anti-seize: http://www.permatex.com/documents/td...tive/81343.pdf .Specifically the "Directions for use" section, line #6.

    Also Engine Builder - proper head bolt use
    Last edited by DannoXYZ; 05-12-09 at 03:48 PM.

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