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  1. #1
    In the right lane gerv's Avatar
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    yet another DIY workstand

    I've been using this workstand lately and find it to be pretty useful for everything but the most difficult tasks (like cranking on "removable" BB cups). For most tasks, it's pretty handy. All my steel tube bikes fit nicely.

    I've tapered the tire tube so that I can push the bike into the stand and it stays pretty firm. I am thinking about some kind of clamping gizmo that will not allow the bike to pop out under any circumstance, even the BB scenario mentioned above.

    The inspiration was in Instructable called "Workmate Bike Stand" which confused me a little at first...
    http://www.instructables.com/id/Workmate-Bike-Stand/

    My stand is clamped into a pretty solid bench vise. No worries about getting loose (but please don't try it with a clamp-on vise). If you have some exposed studding, you can probably just use lag bolts to fix it to the studding.








  2. #2
    Senior Member mrrabbit's Avatar
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    Holy Cow!!!

    I just did the same thing a couple weeks ago...no reference...no Internet Search....just designed my own.

    And mine? Looks almost identical to yours!!!

    =8-)

    I'll take a pic tonight and upload it....

    =8-)

  3. #3
    Senior Member mrrabbit's Avatar
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    Okay...here's some picture of my version:

    1. Overview mounted in wood-vise:



    2. End view showing double-blocking reinforcement - accepts seatposts up to 1 1/8":



    3. Back of main spar showing groove in spar - and two vise mounting bolts that I use as guides. This allows me to tilt front end of bicycle up or down - 15 degrees each way to accomodate head end differences from bike to bike:



    4. Shot of my wood-vise - Made In England. Using a couple small steel plates with freewheel remover in between - I can remove easy freewheels...but not stubborn ones. Wood-vises really weren't meant for that kind of work:



    5. And for those who might thing I'm a blowhard who pretends to be a knowledgeable wheel builder with 2000+ wheels experience...here's half of my current inventory...see any spoke prep anywhere?




    6", 4" and 3.5" #10 Steel Construction screws were used to assemble the DIY bike workstand.

    With rags in place for snug seatpost insertion - the seatpost and bike will not come out on their own - even with lots of manipulation. And it's only 2" deep. It worked out quite well.

    =8-)

  4. #4
    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
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    Instructables is wonderful.
    Please email me rather than sending me a private message. My address is noglider@pobox.com

    Tom Reingold
    New York City and High Falls, NY
    noglider's ride blog

  5. #5
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    Those are the first DIY stands I've seen here that I like. All those black pipe and elbow Park copies look like junk to me.
    I've made several stands using plastic covered hooks to engage the left side chain and seat stays. They're cheap and work fine for adjusting gears, but not for much else. If I added one like those above, I think i'd have everything covered.

    em

  6. #6
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    Even on a "real" workstand (mine is an Ultimate), I don't like to do heavy, high torque jobs with the bike clamped in the stand.

    For bottom bracket removal, I'll pull the crank arms with the bike still pretty much intact and the wheels still mounted. Then to loosen the bb, I'll remove the bike fron the wokstand and put it on the floor on it's wheels while I apply the huge torque needed to break the bb free. Same drill in reverse for reassembly. That way there is no tendency to bend or do other frame tube damage.

  7. #7
    OUTLAW BIKER merckx_rider's Avatar
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    beats hanging them from the rafters with rope
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  8. #8
    In the wind mercator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrrabbit View Post
    Okay...here's some picture of my version:

    1. Overview mounted in wood-vise:


    Nice work guys, parallel inventions.
    I have to ask, though: why do you have a diaper pail in your shop?

  9. #9
    In the right lane gerv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by merckx_rider View Post
    beats hanging them from the rafters with rope
    My last stand was a poly rope hanging from the rafters. I like my current one much better. Only problem is that for my wife's fat tube aluminum bike, I have to go back to the hanging rope. My stand isn't wide enough... have to ponder what to do about that.


    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    Even on a "real" workstand (mine is an Ultimate), I don't like to do heavy, high torque jobs with the bike clamped in the stand.

    For bottom bracket removal, I'll pull the crank arms with the bike still pretty much intact and the wheels still mounted. Then to loosen the bb, I'll remove the bike fron the wokstand and put it on the floor on it's wheels while I apply the huge torque needed to break the bb free. Same drill in reverse for reassembly. That way there is no tendency to bend or do other frame tube damage.
    Even on the best of the best Park professional stands, you have to be careful about how much leverage you put on that wrench... otherwise you'll tip the stand. When I use one of those, I still hold the bike frame against the leverage.

  10. #10
    Senior Member mrrabbit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mercator View Post
    Nice work guys, parallel inventions.
    I have to ask, though: why do you have a diaper pail in your shop?
    To keep the occasional cock roach in once I get 'em in!

    =8-)

    It's a nice garbage can actually...

    =8-)

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerv View Post
    Only problem is that for my wife's fat tube aluminum bike, I have to go back to the hanging rope. My stand isn't wide enough... have to ponder what to do about that.
    Can't you clamp the bike by the seatpost? I bought a couple of the cheapest MTB length seatposts I could find in the required diameters (27.2 and 31.6 mm in my case) and use them specifically as repair stand posts. The extra length reinforces the seat tube and still gives me plenty of length for the clamp to grab.

  12. #12
    Crazy ole cat lady
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    I am missing something here.

    Neither of the two wooden stands here seems to have a way of tightening the grip around the down tube or seat tube. Just wedging the bike in would scratch it so how do you keep the bike from moving when you are working on it?

  13. #13
    Senior Member mrrabbit's Avatar
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    Rag-wrap around the seatpost...enough so that it fits nice and snug. The bike doesn't move any more than it does in a Park stand. Just add or fold rags as necessary to get the required snugness.

    Literally mine are so snug that considerable effort is required to remove the bike - yet no scratches.

    What I'll do is assemble and post another pic with on stand.

    =8-)

  14. #14
    Senior Member mrrabbit's Avatar
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    So here are a couple pics and a couple videos:

    1. Overview of bicycle in DIY stand:




    2. Close-up of seatpost wrapped and mounted in the DIY stand:




    3. A video showing the mounting and unmounting of the bike. Note the color coded rags - two double folded - one single folded. Also note the tight insertion of the seatpost and the tight removal:

    http://www.mrrabbit.net/videos/139-3918_MVI.AVI


    4. Video of me changing the gears up - and slamming on the rear brake. Changing the gears down and slamming on the rear brake again:

    http://www.mrrabbit.net/videos/139-3919_MVI.AVI


    Note: If you plan to build a copy of mine - make the 2.5 inch section for the seatpost a couple inches deeper. It'll provided more room for the saddle edges and take some side lean out of the bike and give you more assurance that it won't slip out.

    =8-)

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    Even on a "real" workstand (mine is an Ultimate), I don't like to do heavy, high torque jobs with the bike clamped in the stand.

    For bottom bracket removal, I'll pull the crank arms with the bike still pretty much intact and the wheels still mounted. Then to loosen the bb, I'll remove the bike fron the wokstand and put it on the floor on it's wheels while I apply the huge torque needed to break the bb free. Same drill in reverse for reassembly. That way there is no tendency to bend or do other frame tube damage.
    I do bottom brackets on the floor as well. I find the only jobs I need a stand for are working on the derailers and cleaning the bike. I've never found a way to hold the bike that makes replacing the headset easy.

    em

  16. #16
    In the right lane gerv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrrabbit View Post

    4. Video of me changing the gears up - and slamming on the rear brake. Changing the gears down and slamming on the rear brake again:

    http://www.mrrabbit.net/videos/139-3919_MVI.AVI
    Your stand is pretty stable. I don't think the bike moves any more than if it was in a Park stand. The only problem might be is your inadvertantly torqued in the wrong direction, the bike might pop off the stand. I've been think about a way around that one, but can't picture anything that wouldn't be a pain to set up.

    You could also set the stand up so the bike could be pushed in about 10-12 inches. That would pretty much take care of the bike popping out, especially if it is tightly in the stand. The tubes seem to keep the bike in pretty solid and I haven't noticed any problem with scratching (although I don't own a Tommasini either...)

    For right now, I'm just careful.
    Last edited by gerv; 05-22-09 at 07:26 PM.

  17. #17
    Bicycle Tinker'er
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    Nice DIY Stands, congrats.

    My stand consists of nylon straps with button-holes looped around a bicycle hook on the ceiling, and a wire tied to a eyehole screw to hold the front end in place. It's simple and works well for me
    First God made the fixie, then he made the freewheel because he was tired of pedaling.

  18. #18
    Senior Member mrrabbit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gerv View Post
    Your stand is pretty stable. I don't think the bike moves any more than if it was in a Park stand. The only problem might be is your inadvertantly torqued in the wrong direction, the bike might pop off the stand. I've been think about a way around that one, but can't picture anything that wouldn't be a pain to set up.

    You could also set the stand up so the bike could be pushed in about 10-12 inches. That would pretty much take care of the bike popping out, especially if it is tightly in the stand. The tubes seem to keep the bike in pretty solid and I haven't noticed any problem with scratching (although I don't own a Tommasini either...)

    For right now, I'm just careful.

    If Park were to make those stand bases any heavier and pipes any beefier...hell...UPS would need fork lifts to get 'em into shops.

    Here's my solution for the next build:

    1. Increase depth of post slot section to 6".
    2. Create a "T" shape piece that is 1.5" thick that drops vertically down into outer last 1.5" of the seatpost slot.
    3. Under each end of the horizontal portion of the "T" will be be 3/4" long dowel ends that insert into holes drilled at the top of both sides of the seatpost slot.

    Long as the dowels fit nice and tight into the holes - it won't come out. Sideways slipout of the bike will be prevented.

    =8-)

  19. #19
    In the right lane gerv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrrabbit View Post
    If Park were to make those stand bases any heavier and pipes any beefier...hell...UPS would need fork lifts to get 'em into shops.

    Here's my solution for the next build:

    1. Increase depth of post slot section to 6".
    2. Create a "T" shape piece that is 1.5" thick that drops vertically down into outer last 1.5" of the seatpost slot.
    3. Under each end of the horizontal portion of the "T" will be be 3/4" long dowel ends that insert into holes drilled at the top of both sides of the seatpost slot.

    Long as the dowels fit nice and tight into the holes - it won't come out. Sideways slipout of the bike will be prevented.

    =8-)
    Great idea! Actually, I wonder if you even need the T-shape block. Just a rectangular block of wood, slipped in after you mount the bike, -- using a dowel or perhaps a bolt with a wing nut-- should work. There isn't much lateral force I would think... you just need to use the little block of wood to keep the seatpost or seat tube from moving too far.

  20. #20
    Junior Member lalahsghost's Avatar
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    I just built a ghetto repair stand and thought I would share it.

    Sorry if this is a little bit off topic, but I'm loving my idea and had to spread it while I get the parts in the mail.

    So, I'm making an under $40 Repair Stand that I have calculated to be just as good as those fancy Euro race stands that Park sells, but less adjustable.

    My base is going to be a solid steel adjustable/folding sawhorse. Although the one at Lowe's is also covered in a thin sheet of foam on top which may or may not last.


    These are selling at my local Lowe's for $21.98.

    I picked up a truck mounted fork holder for $7.99 from my LBS.



    I hope to get a replacement part on Monday from a Park Tool distributor. for under $10. (the blue tipped BB holder)


    I'm gonna drill a couple sets of holes for the fork mount, and this repair stand ( tested by me jumping around on the edges of the sawhorse) will be very sturdy, and the weight differences between front and back will only play a small part. I've also determined I can mount a truing stand on the front if I really desired to put $15 more into this project.

    It reminds me of the old Blackburn Workhorse repair stand, but more adjustable by means of height and wider base, but losing some of the front-to-back adjustment that the Blackburn one has...




    I'm really banking on being able to get the Park Tool piece, but if not.... I'll find an inexpensive way to hold the bb also.

    So what do you guys think? It's not like I have to do anything but drill a few holes and mount a few screws. I'll post more as it is built.

    I also understand this won't be able to be a WOWEE start-to-end bike build type workstand (Fork stuff), but I think it will treat my steeds well.

    Another cool thing is that it will be the perfect base for hauling a bike around the inside of my minivan

    Oh, and guys, I'm one of those people that like to try to build things just to see if I can. (Arcade machine, mini trebuchet, treehouses (a decade or so ago), potato guns, stilts, etc etc etc) If thing is kaput, I have a nice sawhorse and some spare parts.

    Park Tools wanted to know the serial number for the repair stand that I wanted the part for. I told them that I just wanted the piece for something I was building. They said no no and shamed me.

    I had to build the BB holder out of a 3"x4" piece of miter'd wood. PVC was too non manly for me.

    Here are the results.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lalahsg...ed/2009/06/19/





    Even with a ?28? pound bike on there, it is very sturdy and does not feel like it is going to tip over. It does not have any wiggle on it width wise either. $41 solution to a exponentially more expensive problem. It's a bit more slow to adjust the legs than a pole, and the BB holder isn't anything special, but it works well and I like it.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by lalahsghost View Post
    I just built a ghetto repair stand and thought I would share it. ....
    and the BB holder isn't anything special, but it works well and I like it.

    Wow, what a GREAT and simple idea! I have been tuning up all my old bikes and getting back into cycling and am dying for something better than trying to balance them on a folding table. This looks like a great weekend project....!! maybe I can get stickers saying "GRS" to put on it and eveyone will think it's some new, fancy stand out on the market.
    R Bean
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by lalahsghost View Post
    I just built a ghetto repair stand and thought I would share it.

    Sorry if this is a little bit off topic, but I'm loving my idea and had to spread it while I get the parts in the mail.

    So, I'm making an under $40 Repair Stand that I have calculated to be just as good as those fancy Euro race stands that Park sells, but less adjustable.

    My base is going to be a solid steel adjustable/folding sawhorse. Although the one at Lowe's is also covered in a thin sheet of foam on top which may or may not last.
    it.
    I got inspired last weekend by lalahsghost's repair stand, and decided to have a go at building one myself.

    I went down the hardware store to look for a sawhorse, but initially didn't find one. Instead I came across fairly cheap "roller work stands". I figured I could cut the rollers out, and on one of them, bolt on a fork mount, and on the other, make up some sort of bottom bracket holder. It turns out that the roller problem was easier to solve than I thought - they have a spring loaded axle, so the roller can be easily removed.

    I've got some photos, although I don't have a full profile photo, as I was working on it in the kitchen at night

    Here's the best shot of one of these roller work stands, minus the roller, with the fork mount bolted on (and a bike in the fork mount obviously).



    Here's the other roller work stand, supporting a bike bottom bracket. I chopped off most of the plate that supports the roller.



    I realised during the week that a problem with using a fork mount is that once it's tightened, when you raise the bike at the rear to insert the other work stand, you're stressing the forks. I could avoid that by not doing up the fork mount until the rear work stand was in place, however I didn't like the idea of the bike being loose at the front while I'm also lifting up the rear to insert the rear work stand. It's also quite easy to forget to loosen the fork mount when changing the angle of the bike on the rear work stand (talking from experience unfortunately ...)

    I fixed that problem this weekend by making up another fork mount, using an old QR front hub I had, a piece of plate and a couple of U bolts, which is then bolted to the now chopped up plate that used to hold the roller.





    I made up the bottom bracket holder from a piece of "scotia beading", used (I think) between walls and the floor, or walls and the ceiling. It's basically a triangular piece of wood, with a curve cut in the longest face. The piece I found at the hardware store also had a flat cut at the "peak" of the triangle, making it perfect for bolting onto the chopped roller plate of the work stand. The only drawback was that I had to buy about 6 feet of the stuff, when I only need about 2 to 3 inches of it

    I put a single hex head bolt through it, sunk into the wood, and then slid a piece of old mountain bike tube over the top of it. It's then bolted to the chopped roller plate of the work stand. Here's a bit of side shot of it in place - hopefully that's enough to give people the idea:



    It was pretty cheap to make, the most expensive thing was the original fork mount, which cost as much as the total for the two work stands, and of course which I'm not using anymore I'm pretty happy with it, and it's certainly a lot better than using a piece of rope and the clothes line to hold the back wheel off the ground

  23. #23
    Senior Member mrrabbit's Avatar
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    The previous post is worthless without blueprints!



  24. #24
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrrabbit View Post
    5. And for those who might thing I'm a blowhard who pretends to be a knowledgeable wheel builder with 2000+ wheels experience...here's half of my current inventory...see any spoke prep anywhere?

    Ok, where's the can of linseed oil?

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