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Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

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Old 05-31-09, 07:53 PM   #1
roy5000x2
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Tool Kit Advice

I'm looking around for a good tool kit to buy for both personal use and for my collegiate team. Mostly for the collegiate team though. I'd love to be able to have all the tools required to strip down a bike completely and be able to rebuild it without having to go to a bike shop to borrow tools. This includes bottom bracket and headset tools. I would love a Park Tool kit, but I don't think that the budget in the cycling club will be large enough for it. Can anyone recommend a tool kit that will last but isn't insanely expensive? Thanks.
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Old 05-31-09, 08:06 PM   #2
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Avoid Parks "Lazer cut" flat steel headset wrenches. They aren't cut accurately and easily round off aluminum headset nuts. bk
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Old 05-31-09, 08:45 PM   #3
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like this?
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Old 05-31-09, 09:58 PM   #4
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Myself, and many other bike-mechanics, suggest you avoid the tool-kits and buy each tool individually as they are needed. The kits invariably - including Park Tool's kits - will have tools you will never use. Or are obsolete. Buying one at a time and buying the best available will serve to prevent you're having to buy the tool twice as the cheap one's can and do break. You'll be amazed at how quickly you will amass a good inventory of tools for you and/or a club.
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Old 06-01-09, 09:10 AM   #5
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Myself, and many other bike-mechanics, suggest you avoid the tool-kits and buy each tool individually as they are needed. The kits invariably - including Park Tool's kits - will have tools you will never use. Or are obsolete. Buying one at a time and buying the best available will serve to prevent you're having to buy the tool twice as the cheap one's can and do break. You'll be amazed at how quickly you will amass a good inventory of tools for you and/or a club.
That sounds like a pretty good idea. Thanks for the advice!
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Old 06-01-09, 09:18 AM   #6
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Myself, and many other bike-mechanics, suggest you avoid the tool-kits and buy each tool individually as they are needed. The kits invariably - including Park Tool's kits - will have tools you will never use. Or are obsolete. Buying one at a time and buying the best available will serve to prevent you're having to buy the tool twice as the cheap one's can and do break. You'll be amazed at how quickly you will amass a good inventory of tools for you and/or a club.
+1. Absolutely the best advice.
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Old 06-29-09, 11:24 AM   #7
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Myself, and many other bike-mechanics, suggest you avoid the tool-kits and buy each tool individually as they are needed. You'll be amazed at how quickly you will amass a good inventory of tools for you and/or a club.
Actually, it's surprising how few tools are required to completely strip and reassemble a bike frame.
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Old 06-29-09, 12:19 PM   #8
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Actually, it's surprising how few tools are required to completely strip and reassemble a bike frame.
Indeed. And how many of them can be purchased from SEARS as Craftsman tools. They break - they replace. No questions asked.
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Old 06-29-09, 01:20 PM   #9
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Urgh, Crapsman tools? They aren't the quality that they used to be.
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Old 06-29-09, 02:37 PM   #10
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I find their metric-wrenches and screwdrivers and pliers, etc. - to be quite good all in all. You want to pay for Snap-On? Be my guest. However I'd hesitate to buy a generator or chainsaw from them. For simple hand-tools, I've been using them for years with no problems - aside from the occasional screwdriver that get used to stir paint. I traded it in for a new one - no problem.
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Old 06-29-09, 04:42 PM   #11
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aside from the occasional screwdriver that get used to stir paint. I traded it in for a new one - no problem.
TRADED IT IN!!!!

"The crummy screwdriver" that you'd never use as a screwdriver, is possibly the most versatile item in your tool box. This is one case where bigger really is better.
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Old 06-29-09, 04:56 PM   #12
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http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=T0045

What about a tool kit like this? It seems to have a lot of bike specific tools. I have wrenches, screwdrivers, sockets. So something like this seems pretty desirable or even the cheaper budget model.
http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=T0046
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Old 06-29-09, 04:56 PM   #13
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Urgh, Crapsman tools? They aren't the quality that they used to be.
I do agree that they've slipped a notch or two over the last decade or so, but I still consider them a pretty fair bargain for the DIY'er.
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