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  1. #1
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    Are these eBay rims worth buying?

    I'd like some durable, inexpensive rims suitable for commuting over poor pavement. Would these rims be suitable?

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Mavic-A319-Sillv...3%3A1|294%3A50

    The Deore XT hubs are nice, but I've heard of problems with the 319s and I'm wondering if having 4 less spokes than the recommended 36 makes a big difference.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    How heavy are you and what kind of loads will you be carrying with you? How poor of pavement are you talking about?

  3. #3
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    Make sure your frame's got 135mm spacing at the rear dropouts...

  4. #4
    Senior Member vredstein's Avatar
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    thumbs up

    I've heard far more good than bad about those rims. The wheels are hand built, and if you notice, the rear wheel has a little piece of brown tape on one spoke. This was used by the builder as an indicator flag so he could compensate for spoke twist. This shows he knew what he was doing. The hubs are great, great seals, easily serviceable. You might find a similar set of machine built wheels for cheaper, but these show every indication of a quality build. The rims are wide enough to use 35 or 40 mm tires which would be perfect for commuting over poor pavement. Considering the quality of the components and the quality of the build, 32 spokes will be plenty strong.
    "See, it's not that getting wet is a big deal. Really, it's what you're getting wet with.
    Fenders....because it's probably urine."
    Bike Snob NYC

  5. #5
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    I just found what looks like a good deal on some wheels. $320 gets me a set of 40-spoke Velocity Dyad rims laced 4-over to Velocity 130mm cartridge-bearing Shimano compatible hubs with disc brake mounts. It looks like a suspiciously good deal.

    http://www.bikemania.biz/VeloCity_Dy...ty_touring.htm

    Quote Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
    How heavy are you and what kind of loads will you be carrying with you? How poor of pavement are you talking about?
    Me (193lbs.) plus up to 30 pounds of miscellaneous crap. Some of the roads around here are bad enough to make people nervous about damaging their cars. There's also the occasional "Oh crap, it's a drunk driver!" bail on to the median. I'm a pretty poor cyclist, and I'm hoping to compensate by building a sort of 2-wheeled tank.


    Quote Originally Posted by dwr1961 View Post
    Make sure your frame's got 135mm spacing at the rear dropouts...
    That's the primary problem with the wheels. Either I spend serious $$$ on a LHT or cyclocross frame, or buy an old steel frame and take a mallet to it. Problematic either way, especially since I'd like to start biking in winter and Wisconsin is very keen on road salt - a beat-up old steel frame is asking for trouble.
    Last edited by Spasticteapot; 06-09-09 at 11:47 PM.

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