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  1. #1
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    Removing a stuck crankarm

    I'm converting a pretty rusty old Fuji Absolute into a fixed gear and I wanted to swap the crank or at least get rid of the larger chainring. I managed to pop off both dust caps and remove the nut on each crank arm with a socket wrench but then I had a lot of trouble removing the crankarms from the BB. I managed to get the left one off after riding around nutless for a while; however, I can't seem to remove the right crank arm no matter how hard I try. Would it be worth getting a crank puller to remove the right side and finally take apart the chainrings? Or is there another method I can use to get it off easily? Thanks!

  2. #2
    Senior Member MudPie's Avatar
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    Best get a crank arm puller. Riding around nutless often loosens the crank, but in the process, it can round out the crank arm so that it will not seat correctly on the the spindle.

  3. #3
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    And how does a crank puller work? Will it definitely fix my problem and get the right crankarm and chainrings off?

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Please don't work on any other bikes until you know the proper tools for the job. The proper tools are almost always worth the (relatively, compared to say automotive tools) small cost.

    A crank puller has a main piece that threads into the crank arm itself. The main piece is tapped and a forcing screw is threaded into it. The forcing screw pushes against the bottom bracket as it's screwed into the main piece. Since the main piece is attached (by the threads) to the crank arm, the arm is forced off the spindle.

    Your method of removing a crank arm will likely have damaged it to the point where it's either already useless or will shortly be.

  5. #5
    i ride a bicycle
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    are you planning on reusing the crank arms? I hope not, because riding around to loosen them has almost definitely damaged them (the left one at least). Buy a crank puller, it's only like ten bucks and you'll save yourself that ten dollars many times over each time you use it instead of going to a shop.

    Mac

  6. #6
    Faster than yesterday
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    i'd like to be able to ride nutless. I squish them occasionally.

  7. #7
    Senior Member johnknappcc's Avatar
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    Park makes a great one, with an integrated handle. I think you can find it for under 20 bucks, and it's quite a joy to use.

    The outer part threads into the crank arms, and then the inner part (which is attached to the handle) screws into that and pushes on the spindle. That force pops the crank off.

  8. #8
    Great State of Varmint Panthers007's Avatar
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    Here is an example of a crank-arm puller that your LBS should be able to get you:

    http://www.parktool.com/products/det...26&item=CCP-22
    Quote Originally Posted by Cateye View Post
    Only panthers007 is stupid enough to believe that this is a good idea.

  9. #9
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    I think swaping for a new crank is in your future as the current left arm is already damaged, probably to the point of uselessness.

    If you don't have or want to buy the proper tools, take the bike to a shop and pay the couple of bucks to have them do the job properly. It's cheaper than buying new parts.

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